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Salute! The General Quiz 2020 (Prelims + Finals)

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Salute! The General Quiz 2020 (Prelims + Finals)

  1. 1. Salute! The General Quiz LSR 2020
  2. 2. PRELIMS ○ 25 questions ○ No blocking
  3. 3. 1. The Diomede Islands are located in the middle of the Bering Strait between mainland Alaska and Siberia. Because they are separated by The International Date Line, Big Diomede is almost a day ahead of Little Diomede but not completely; due to locally defined time zones, Big Diomede is only 21 hours ahead of Little Diomede. Because of this difference, they are famously called X and Y islands. Id X and Y.
  4. 4. 2. Connect: Ursula K. Le Guin Margaret Atwood Gabriel Garcia Marquez Roald Dahl Haruki Murakami Jack Kerouac Kurt Vonnegut Joseph Heller Ian Fleming
  5. 5. 3. XY is a small city situated on the ____-_____ border. It is economically linked to the much larger city YX (not really) lying directly across the international border in the neighbouring country. The cities were referenced a few times in a recent show about drug cartels.
  6. 6. 4 Spellbound is a 1945 American film-noir psychological mystery thriller film directed by X starring Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck. A point of contention between X and the the producer David Selznick was the hiring of the artist Y to create a key dream sequence that was ultimately cut down to two minutes from twenty minutes.
  7. 7. 5. Whose obituary? Give funda
  8. 8. 6. All of the five Kardashian women have middle names. Kendall Jenner's middle name, specifically, was kept in honor of a German-American individual who died in 1994. This individual was very close to Kris Jenner and her then husband. The death of this person was not only a sensational event causing a media circus, it also caused a deep rift between Kris Jenner and her ex-husband due to their different beliefs about the event. Which individual was this, references to whom you would find in a 2016 TV series?
  9. 9. 7. A recent survey conducted by 5W Public Relations in the US found that 38% of the respondents wouldn’t carry out a specific action at the moment. This is undeniably, although mistakenly, linked to a recent ongoing event. 14% of a subgroup of the respondents also said they would refrain from carrying out the action currently. Although the survey size is relatively small, only consisting of 737 Americans, it still gives an insight into not only how mistaken linkages lead to problems with economic consequences, but also how people often don’t think through things and make hasty assumptions. What was this mistaken linkage and action?
  10. 10. 8. ID the classical piece used in this soundtrack from John Wick 3.
  11. 11. 9. “Jolene” is a song written and sung by American country music artist Dolly Parton. It was released on October 15th, 1973, and is ranked No. 217 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of "the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" in 2004. “Jolene” is also the song most recorded by other artists of all the songs she has written, according to Parton. What is not as well known is that on the same night that she wrote “Jolene,” Parton also wrote one of her other iconic songs, that perhaps today is more famously known from a cover sung by another popular female artist, who sang it for the soundtrack of a movie in the ‘90s. This other song was the single that was released after “Jolene” in 1974. It is one of the few songs that has managed to reach in the top 3 position in Billboard’s hot 100 in 3 different runs/releases.
  12. 12. 10. In a Los Angeles Times column published on March 15, 1951, writer Marvin Miles observed a peculiar phrase spreading throughout his circle of friends and the social scene at large. In this context, the married men speaking to Miles believed _______ ______ could be collected by husbands who remembered birthdays and anniversaries, stopped to pick up the dry cleaning, mailed letters, and didn’t spend long nights in pubs speaking to newspaper columnists. The most pervasive explanation is that the phrase originated with the ________, a subsect of the Girl Scouts who were encouraged to perform good deeds in their communities. Over the decades, the phrase _______ ______ has become synonymous with currying favor, often with authority figures such as teachers or employers. We love _______ ______ in quizzing!
  13. 13. 11. The term _____ ____, often used to express shock, astonishment, or amazement, was used as early as 1552 although it’s said to have really caught on with people and popular usage in the early 1800s. Although not originally an English term, a lot of British and in general, Anglophone, writers tend to use it as a stereotypical mark to distinguish X people. The term emerged as Christians were hesitant to use God’s name in vain and thus searched for homophones for the word ‘God’ (in their language). That put together with the first word (that denotes something ‘holy’) helped them avoid blasphemy. It’s now a popularly used phrase although its popular usage amongst X people is said to have died down around the mid-1900s. FITB.
  14. 14. 12. Earlier this year, Pitchfork, an American online magazine, put out a review of Halsey’s latest album, giving it a 6.5/10 and saying that “too much of this album sounds like the amorphous pop that you might associate with a miserable Lyft ride.” In response to this, Halsey, in typical stan Twitter type behaviour, tweeted, “can the basement that they run p*tchfork out of just collapse already.” Unfortunately, while tweeting her response, Halsey failed to do some background research on the implications of her words, that would’ve led her PR team scrambling to do some clean up. What was this gap that Halsey failed to realize?
  15. 15. 12.
  16. 16. 13. “Overview effect” is a mental phenomenon, the term for which was first coined by author Frank White in the 1970s when he was on a flight. Experienced mainly (or, well, widely, at least) by people from a certain profession, others not from that profession can also feel at least a part of the effect while looking at images that evoke similar feelings. It is said to result in a cognitive shift in awareness and of the people have also said that while looking back at something wasn’t the original focus of their work objectives, in retrospect, doing so “may well have been the most important reason.” What does the “overview effect” actually mean?
  17. 17. 14. X is a feature that was first introduced in Cadillacs before it became a norm and is now an essential that no car (or vehicle, in general) would be without. Mary Anderson is popularly credited with making the first operational manual X in 1903 although patents for this device date back to 1896. In Anderson’s design, the device is worked using a lever from inside the vehicle and closely resembles the device’s current form. The first electric automatic X was patented by Charlotte Bridgwood in 1917. ID X.
  18. 18. 15. “Verbifying” is a phenomenon wherein a noun ends up being used as a ‘verb’ in daily use. For brands, it would usually seem to be a boon as it just strengthens their brand image and recognition amongst households. However, intellectual property attorneys fear that it could also lead to “genericide” for a product or a brand, wherein the trademark’s legal power is lost. There’s several examples of “verbifying” with products and brands that have deeply embedded themselves into our daily use vocabulary, some of them being ‘Xerox’ and ‘Rollerblade.’ Working along these lines, a relatively lesser known fact is that the word X, which has also become a very common verbified word, was first used as a verb on television in 2002 in an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. That once instance in the TV show led to such widespread impact all 60 members of a committee selected by the American Dialect Society voted to make it 2002’s most useful new word. ID X.
  19. 19. 16. In November of 1440, the newly-appointed 6th Earl of Douglas, who was just 16, and his little brother David, were invited to join the 10-year-old King of Scotland, James II, for dinner at Edinburgh Castle. But it wasn’t the young King who had invited the Douglas brothers. The invitation had been issued by Sir William Crichton, Chancellor of Scotland, who feared that the Black Douglas (there was another clan called the Red Douglas) were growing too powerful. As legend has it, the children were all getting along marvelously, enjoying food, entertainment and talking until the end of the dinner, when the head of a black bull was dropped on the table, symbolizing the death of the Black Douglas. The two young Douglases were dragged outside, given a mock trial, found guilty of high treason, and beheaded. It’s said that the Earl pleaded for his brother to be killed first so that the younger boy wouldn’t have to witness his older brother’s beheading. What pop culture sequence did these events inspire?
  20. 20. 17. Different countries have their own explanations and perceptions of various symbols and characters. What is the character (not in the literary sense, but a general meaning) being referred to here? France, Italy, South Korea: Snail Russia: Little dog Germany, Poland, South Africa, Indonesia: Monkey’s tail China: Mouse Czech Republic: Rollmops (rolled pickled herring) Israel: Strudel Denmark, Sweden: Elephant’s trunk Kazakhstan: Moon’s ear Greece: Little duck
  21. 21. 18. Poltergeist (1982), directed by Tobe Hooper and produced by Steven Spielberg and Frank Marshall, is one of the most famous horror films today. Aside from receiving multiple nominations from the Academy Awards and winning other prizes, it’s also been recognized as a classic by different associations and institutes and has spawned two sequels and a remake. Being a supernatural horror movie, it’s inevitable that rumours regarding how “true” to its nature of horror it is rise up. As such, there is a “Poltergeist curse” rumour that runs around on the internet, claiming that this curse exists and can be seen with how some of the actors in the movie either had premature deaths or faced some other wildly unusual situations. While that all is up to speculation and theories, certain actions carried out during the filming of the movie and certain scenes end up feeding these theories, even if they were done for other, unrelated reasons. One such scene is in the latter half of the movie, where a decision made by the staff in order to cut costs, is now rumoured to have heavily lent to the “Poltergeist curse.” What was this decision?
  22. 22. 19. ______ _____ is a situational comedy show that premiered on ABC in 1987 and can be “seen” now on Netflix. It was filmed in front of a live studio audience and lasted for nine seasons. Each episode lasted twenty-two minutes. ______ _____ was initially dismissed by critics as broad, saccharine and mediocre. However, the family comedy struck a chord with the United States and went on to air for nine seasons.
  23. 23. 20. The first X was created in 1943 by Eleanor Lambert. The event, the world’s first organized _______ ____, was called “Press Week”, and was created to attract attention away from French _______ during World War II, when a certain group of people were unable to travel to Paris. What was born out of Eleanor Lambert’s idea, something that took place a few days ago?
  24. 24. 21. Considering the Civil War had ended only a few days earlier, April 14, 1865, was a normal day in the White House. President Abraham Lincoln read his newspapers, ate his breakfast, met with his cabinet. He also signed a piece of legislation authorizing a government agency. That evening, he was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth while watching Our American Cousin in Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. Though the government agency he authorized on that day’s original work was to investigate and stop counterfeit money, it is hard to miss the irony of the situation.
  25. 25. 22. X,___ is a work by a very famous French painter. When asked for a title for it, the painter simply said “call it X,” named so in order to avoid criticism of the work being unfinished or lacking detail. X however, received the same criticism anyway. This work, set in the artist's hometown, Le Havre, is symbolic of a pivotal moment in the history of art. What is X? The dash is simply a description of what is there in the work.
  26. 26. 23. X is a Hindi word, which stands for a very prominent symbol of the License Permit Raj in India. X can also remind you of something from Indian classical music. This word is now synonymous with a certain kind of near ubiquitous establishment which is often mired in various controversies. Id X.
  27. 27. 24. ____ is an American drama television series about New York City’s African- American and Latino LGBTQ and gender non-conforming underground drag ballroom culture scene in the 1980s and 1990s. While a work of creative fiction, the series is “heavily inspired by” Jennie Livingston’s 1990 documentary, _____ __ _______. The name of the documentary being named like a jumbled version of the book “__ _____ _______?” by Larry Collins and Dominique Lapierre. Name the show and the documentary that influenced it.
  28. 28. 25. ID the voice actor for Cousin Itt.
  29. 29. ANSWERS
  30. 30. 1. The Diomede Islands are located in the middle of the Bering Strait between mainland Alaska and Siberia. Because they are separated by The International Date Line, Big Diomede is almost a day ahead of Little Diomede but not completely; due to locally defined time zones, Big Diomede is only 21 hours ahead of Little Diomede. Because of this difference, they are famously called X and Y islands. Id X and Y.
  31. 31. Yesterday Island and Tomorrow Island
  32. 32. 2. Connect: Ursula K. Le Guin Margaret Atwood Gabriel Garcia Marquez Roald Dahl Haruki Murakami Jack Kerouac Kurt Vonnegut Joseph Heller Ian Fleming
  33. 33. Playboy Magazine
  34. 34. 3. XY is a small city situated on the ____-_____ border. It is economically linked to the much larger city YX (not really) lying directly across the international border in the neighbouring country. The cities were referenced a few times in a recent show about drug cartels.
  35. 35. Calexico and Mexicali
  36. 36. 4 Spellbound is a 1945 American film-noir psychological mystery thriller film directed by X starring Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck. A point of contention between X and the the producer David Selznick was the hiring of the artist Y to create a key dream sequence that was ultimately cut down to two minutes from twenty minutes.
  37. 37. Alfred Hitchcock and Salvador Dali
  38. 38. 5. Whose obituary? Give funda
  39. 39. Hercule Poirot The only fictional character to get an obituary on the front page of the New York Times
  40. 40. 6. All of the five Kardashian women have middle names. Kendall Jenner's middle name, specifically, was kept in honor of a German-American individual who died in 1994. This individual was very close to Kris Jenner and her then husband. The death of this person was not only a sensational event causing a media circus, it also caused a deep rift between Kris Jenner and her ex-husband due to their different beliefs about the event. Which individual was this, references to whom you would find in a 2016 TV series?
  41. 41. Nicole Brown Simpson
  42. 42. 7. A recent survey conducted by 5W Public Relations in the US found that 38% of the respondents wouldn’t carry out a specific action at the moment. This is undeniably, although mistakenly, linked to a recent ongoing event. 14% of a subgroup of the respondents also said they would refrain from carrying out the action currently. Although the survey size is relatively small, only consisting of 737 Americans, it still gives an insight into not only how mistaken linkages lead to problems with economic consequences, but also how people often don’t think through things and make hasty assumptions. What was this mistaken linkage and action?
  43. 43. Corona beer & coronavirus
  44. 44. 8. ID the classical piece used in this soundtrack from John Wick 3.
  45. 45. Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons”
  46. 46. 9. “Jolene” is a song written and sung by American country music artist Dolly Parton. It was released on October 15th, 1973, and is ranked No. 217 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of "the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" in 2004. “Jolene” is also the song most recorded by other artists of all the songs she has written, according to Parton. What is not as well known is that on the same night that she wrote “Jolene,” Parton also wrote one of her other iconic songs, that perhaps today is more famously known from a cover sung by another popular female artist, who sang it for the soundtrack of a movie in the ‘90s. This other song was the single that was released after “Jolene” in 1974. It is one of the few songs that has managed to reach in the top 3 position in Billboard’s hot 100 in 3 different runs/releases.
  47. 47. “I Will Always Love You”
  48. 48. 10. In a Los Angeles Times column published on March 15, 1951, writer Marvin Miles observed a peculiar phrase spreading throughout his circle of friends and the social scene at large. In this context, the married men speaking to Miles believed _______ ______ could be collected by husbands who remembered birthdays and anniversaries, stopped to pick up the dry cleaning, mailed letters, and didn’t spend long nights in pubs speaking to newspaper columnists. The most pervasive explanation is that the phrase originated with the ________, a subsect of the Girl Scouts who were encouraged to perform good deeds in their communities. Over the decades, the phrase _______ ______ has become synonymous with currying favor, often with authority figures such as teachers or employers. We love _______ ______ in quizzing!
  49. 49. 10. Brownie points
  50. 50. 11. The term _____ ____, often used to express shock, astonishment, or amazement, was used as early as 1552 although it’s said to have really caught on with people and popular usage in the early 1800s. Although not originally an English term, a lot of British and in general, Anglophone, writers tend to use it as a stereotypical mark to distinguish X people. The term emerged as Christians were hesitant to use God’s name in vain and thus searched for homophones for the word ‘God’ (in their language). That put together with the first word (that denotes something ‘holy’) helped them avoid blasphemy. It’s now a popularly used phrase although its popular usage amongst X people is said to have died down around the mid-1900s. FITB.
  51. 51. Sacre bleu
  52. 52. 12. Earlier this year, Pitchfork, an American online magazine, put out a review of Halsey’s latest album, giving it a 6.5/10 and saying that “too much of this album sounds like the amorphous pop that you might associate with a miserable Lyft ride.” In response to this, Halsey, in typical stan Twitter type behaviour, tweeted, “can the basement that they run p*tchfork out of just collapse already.” Unfortunately, while tweeting her response, Halsey failed to do some background research on the implications of her words, that would’ve led her PR team scrambling to do some clean up. What was this gap that Halsey failed to realize?
  53. 53. 12.
  54. 54. The building is the One World Trade Center
  55. 55. 13. “Overview effect” is a mental phenomenon, the term for which was first coined by author Frank White in the 1970s when he was on a flight. Experienced mainly (or, well, widely, at least) by people from a certain profession, others not from that profession can also feel at least a part of the effect while looking at images that evoke similar feelings. It is said to result in a cognitive shift in awareness and of the people have also said that while looking back at something wasn’t the original focus of their work objectives, in retrospect, doing so “may well have been the most important reason.” What does the “overview effect” actually mean?
  56. 56. When you realize how big the world is - an existentialist mental clarity basically, mostly felt by astronauts
  57. 57. 14. X is a feature that was first introduced in Cadillacs before it became a norm and is now an essential that no car (or vehicle, in general) would be without. Mary Anderson is popularly credited with making the first operational manual X in 1903 although patents for this device date back to 1896. In Anderson’s design, the device is worked using a lever from inside the vehicle and closely resembles the device’s current form. The first electric automatic X was patented by Charlotte Bridgwood in 1917. ID X.
  58. 58. Windshield wiper
  59. 59. 15. “Verbifying” is a phenomenon wherein a noun ends up being used as a ‘verb’ in daily use. For brands, it would usually seem to be a boon as it just strengthens their brand image and recognition amongst households. However, intellectual property attorneys fear that it could also lead to “genericide” for a product or a brand, wherein the trademark’s legal power is lost. There’s several examples of “verbifying” with products and brands that have deeply embedded themselves into our daily use vocabulary, some of them being ‘Xerox’ and ‘Rollerblade.’ Working along these lines, a relatively lesser known fact is that the word X, which has also become a very common verbified word, was first used as a verb on television in 2002 in an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. That once instance in the TV show led to such widespread impact all 60 members of a committee selected by the American Dialect Society voted to make it 2002’s most useful new word. ID X.
  60. 60. Google
  61. 61. 16. In November of 1440, the newly-appointed 6th Earl of Douglas, who was just 16, and his little brother David, were invited to join the 10-year-old King of Scotland, James II, for dinner at Edinburgh Castle. But it wasn’t the young King who had invited the Douglas brothers. The invitation had been issued by Sir William Crichton, Chancellor of Scotland, who feared that the Black Douglas (there was another clan called the Red Douglas) were growing too powerful. As legend has it, the children were all getting along marvelously, enjoying food, entertainment and talking until the end of the dinner, when the head of a black bull was dropped on the table, symbolizing the death of the Black Douglas. The two young Douglases were dragged outside, given a mock trial, found guilty of high treason, and beheaded. It’s said that the Earl pleaded for his brother to be killed first so that the younger boy wouldn’t have to witness his older brother’s beheading. What pop culture sequence did these events inspire?
  62. 62. Red Wedding
  63. 63. 17. Different countries have their own explanations and perceptions of various symbols and characters. What is the character (not in the literary sense, but a general meaning) being referred to here? France, Italy, South Korea: Snail Russia: Little dog Germany, Poland, South Africa, Indonesia: Monkey’s tail China: Mouse Czech Republic: Rollmops (rolled pickled herring) Israel: Strudel Denmark, Sweden: Elephant’s trunk Kazakhstan: Moon’s ear Greece: Little duck
  64. 64. @
  65. 65. 18. Poltergeist (1982), directed by Tobe Hooper and produced by Steven Spielberg and Frank Marshall, is one of the most famous horror films today. Aside from receiving multiple nominations from the Academy Awards and winning other prizes, it’s also been recognized as a classic by different associations and institutes and has spawned two sequels and a remake. Being a supernatural horror movie, it’s inevitable that rumours regarding how “true” to its nature of horror it is rise up. As such, there is a “Poltergeist curse” rumour that runs around on the internet, claiming that this curse exists and can be seen with how some of the actors in the movie either had premature deaths or faced some other wildly unusual situations. While that all is up to speculation and theories, certain actions carried out during the filming of the movie and certain scenes end up feeding these theories, even if they were done for other, unrelated reasons. One such scene is in the latter half of the movie, where a decision made by the staff in order to cut costs, is now rumoured to have heavily lent to the “Poltergeist curse.” What was this decision?
  66. 66. Used real skeletons instead of fake ones
  67. 67. 19. ______ _____ is a situational comedy show that premiered on ABC in 1987 and can be “seen” now on Netflix. It was filmed in front of a live studio audience and lasted for nine seasons. Each episode lasted twenty-two minutes. ______ _____ was initially dismissed by critics as broad, saccharine and mediocre. However, the family comedy struck a chord with the United States and went on to air for nine seasons.
  68. 68. Horsin’ Around
  69. 69. 20. The first X was created in 1943 by Eleanor Lambert. The event, the world’s first organized _______ ____, was called “Press Week”, and was created to attract attention away from French _______ during World War II, when a certain group of people were unable to travel to Paris. What was born out of Eleanor Lambert’s idea, something that took place a few days ago?
  70. 70. New York Fashion Week
  71. 71. 21. Considering the Civil War had ended only a few days earlier, April 14, 1865, was a normal day in the White House. President Abraham Lincoln read his newspapers, ate his breakfast, met with his cabinet. He also signed a piece of legislation authorizing a government agency. That evening, he was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth while watching Our American Cousin in Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. Though the government agency he authorized on that day’s original work was to investigate and stop counterfeit money, it is hard to miss the irony of the situation.
  72. 72. United States Secret Service
  73. 73. 22. X,___ is a work by a very famous French painter. When asked for a title for it, the painter simply said “call it X,” named so in order to avoid criticism of the work being unfinished or lacking detail. X however, received the same criticism anyway. This work, set in the artist's hometown, Le Havre, is symbolic of a pivotal moment in the history of art. What is X? The dash is simply a description of what is there in the work.
  74. 74. Impression, Sunrise by Claude Monet, which coined the term ‘impressionism’
  75. 75. 23. X is a Hindi word, which stands for a very prominent symbol of the License Permit Raj in India. X can also remind you of something from Indian classical music. This word is now synonymous with a certain kind of near ubiquitous establishment which of often mired in controversy. Id X.
  76. 76. Theka, which is hindi for a license/contract
  77. 77. 24. ____ is an American drama television series about New York City’s African- American and Latino LGBTQ and gender non-conforming underground drag ballroom culture scene in the 1980s and 1990s. While a work of creative fiction, the series is “heavily inspired by” Jennie Livingston’s 1990 documentary, _____ __ _______. The name of the documentary being named like a jumbled version of the book “__ _____ _______?” by Larry Collins and Dominique Lapierre. Name the show and the documentary that influenced it.
  78. 78. POSE Paris is burning
  79. 79. 25. ID the voice actor for Cousin Itt.
  80. 80. Snoop Dogg
  81. 81. FINALS
  82. 82. FINALS ○ 30 questions ○ Regular bounce/pounce rules apply (no negatives on bounce, +10/-5 on pounce) ○ QMs’ decision is final!
  83. 83. 1. Michael Field was a poet in the late 1880s who, although didn’t have his work selling in large numbers, had managed to attract an elite set of influential admirers. Field was a part of the aesthetic movement, which promoted an “art for art’s sake” philosophy, celebrating beauty as free of moral or utilitarian considerations. His colleagues included Oscar Wilde, the art critic Bernard Berenson, and the artists and designers Charles Ricketts and Charles Shannon. At a point, when his works were being enthusiastically received, reviewers even suggested that Field be appointed as the poet laureate, which is an esteemed position officially appointed by the government, or in Britain’s case, the royal household. However, he was unable to receive the position due to a rather scandalous, though not particularly unique or unheard of, reason about his identity. What was this reason that not only kept him from being nominated for the position, but also was perhaps one of the reasons why he never gained a much larger following and felt that the world was against him?
  84. 84. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  85. 85. 1. Michael Field was actually a pseudonym used by Katharine Harris Bradley and her niece and lover, Edith Emma Cooper.
  86. 86. 2. Give funda for the connect between two horse asses and American standard railroad gauges. Hints available.
  87. 87. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  88. 88. 2. Railroads designed following the railroad measurements from England, which were based on the gauge for the mine tramways that were in turn the approximate gauge of Roman road vehicles, primarily carts and chariots, which were wide enough to fit two horses for pulling.
  89. 89. 3. May 35th (not a typo) is among a long list of code words used by the netizens of a certain country that is home to nearly 800 million internet users. An example of the way it is used: Why is it used?
  90. 90. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  91. 91. 3. The 1989 Tiananmen Square Protests commonly known in China as the June Fourth Incident. May 35 used to bypass internet censorship in China as the Chinese government deems June 4th massacre/crackdown/anything too “sensitive”.
  92. 92. 4. The acclaimed novelist X approached the Indian actor Y with an offer to make a film in English with Indian actors. Y said no to this offer, keeping in mind his fan following in India. By this time, someone suggested to Y a certain very famous novel by an Indian author. Y made a quick read and was so enthused that he contacted the author X to make the film. This film was made eventually, with the English version of the movie based on the novel and the Hindi version of the movie not based on the novel. ID the novel in question.
  93. 93. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  94. 94. “Guide” by RK Narayan
  95. 95. 5. “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” is a rock musical about Hedwig Schmidt, a genderqueer East German singer of a rock and roll band, The Angry Inch, written by John Cameron Mitchell and with lyrics by Stephen Trask. It follows Hedwig’s journey as she discovers herself and tells her life story through different live stage performances. In many of the numbers, she is accompanied by her husband, Yitzhak, who’s a Jewish drag queen from Zagreb. In the last number of the musical, “Midnight Radio,” that is sung by Yitzhak, there’s a shout-out to some of the most famous ladies in the rock & roll scene, all of whom have helped shape the music landscape to what it is today. FITB for all the ladies: “Here’s to Patti (Smith), Tina ______ & ____ ___ ______ ________ & Nona (Hendryx) & Nico & me!”
  96. 96. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  97. 97. 5. Patti Smith Tina Turner Yoko Ono Aretha Franklin Nona Hendryx
  98. 98. 6. Unilever is the world’s biggest ___ _____ manufacturer, with an annual turnover of €5 billion. With the exception of its U. S. brands, the bulk of the company’s ___ _____ falls under its “Heartbrand” brand umbrella, so called because of the brand’s heart shaped logo. The local sub-brands (variants in different countries) of Heartbrand include: Algida, Bresler, GB Glace, Good Humor, Langnese, Eskimo etc. Name the Indian/South Asian variant of Heartbrand.
  99. 99. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  100. 100. 6. Kwality Wall’s
  101. 101. 7. During the Mardi Gras of 1978, a peaceful protest in the form of a march took place in Sydney, Australia. But what started off as a march full of a fun, festive mood, soon turned ugly when a police officer decided to interrupt and disrupt the march. The participants, however, only became more emboldened to break through the cycle of hate that they’d been facing before and made the split-second decision to instead march towards King’s Cross. The violence and assault that occurred there, a revolution taking place, is often said to parallel events from nine years ago in another continent, that was fighting for the same rights and celebrating the same existence. The night of Mardi Gras of 1978 ended with 53 people being arrested, and loud chants of support and calling for release being heard outside. The morning after, though had all 53 released, also saw that all of them of their names and occupations subsequently published in The Sydney Morning Herald. Many lost their jobs or housing as a result. However, in years following it, that night has become a revolutionary date that has been enshrined in those people’s efforts, who are widely known as the “‘78ers.” What was the march for?
  102. 102. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  103. 103. Gay rights
  104. 104. The Yoshida Manufacturing Shareholding Company is a Japanese group of manufacturing companies founded in 1934 that manufactures architectural products, fastening products, plastic hardware and industrial machinery at 109 facilities in 71 countries worldwide. Yet they are mainly known for making one particular product X. The company is responsible for making roughly half of all the X in the world - more than 7 billion a year. The company name is so ubiquitous, we can 100% guarantee that you have seen it at some point in your life. 8.
  105. 105. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  106. 106. Yoshida Kōgyō Kabushiki Gaisha
  107. 107. 9. Vanuatu is an island nation situated about 1,000 miles east of northern Australia. While a relatively small nation, with a population of just about around 300,000 people, Vanuatu is becoming an increasingly popular tourist destination. While this, in part, is thanks to reality TV shows like Survivor and Celebrity Survivor (the Australian version), another reason lies with a first that this island managed to accomplish in 2003. The popularity of this first spiked and led to several other countries (Japan, Norway, and Malaysia) copying it. What is this unique idea that was initially just joked over drinks by a local resort-owner and his friend that became a reality and gives tourists a special experience to share with their families back home?
  108. 108. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  109. 109. First underwater post-office
  110. 110. 10. Jimmy was an actor who acted in over a 1,000 feature films from the 1930s to 1950s, acting in movies such as It’s a Wonderful Life and The Wizard of Oz. He was trained in a number of tricks and skills aside from acting that widened his scope in his acting career. At one point in his career, it’s said that he had 21 stand-ins, 15 of which were female. Jimmy had also received a Red Cross gold medal in acknowledgement of 200 hours spent entertaining veterans after the war, and has been enshrined in cement at Los Angeles amongst his other successful co-stars. Who is Jimmy?
  111. 111. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  112. 112. Jimmy the Raven
  113. 113. 11. The lexicon adopted by politicians and bureaucrats, especially those higher up in the system, end up shaping not only the policies, but also the way the people under them work, and at a larger scale, for countries and governments with enough power, how the world (international relations, etc.) shifts and changes. In October, 2019, Frances Z. Brown, a former director in the National Security Council wrote about his experiences with working in both the Obama and Trump administrations and how their differing lexicons changed the way he worked and interacted with others within his work sphere. Unlike the previous administration, where Obama was a fond and frequent user of sports terminologies and phrases to get his point across and build up a teamwork spirit, Trump’s administration was quite the opposite. In Brown’s months with this new administration, he came to three simple realizations about how Trump works. What were these 3 realizations? Hints to follow.
  114. 114. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  115. 115. 1. Lack of clarity is the point 2. Language of threats 3. Everything is personal
  116. 116. 12. _____ __ ___ _____ is a sheer visual extravaganza, but the film’s soundtrack and musical selections also offer up just as much nuance and depth. Perhaps the most striking musical number is its opening theme, “______ __ _ ______” that recurs throughout the film. When composing the theme, Kawai tried his best to capture the core of this futuristic universe and would meld a few styles together in order to tap into the protagonist’s eclectic world. “______ __ _ ______” features lyrics from the ancient Japanese language of Yamoto that is paired together with a traditional Bulgarian harmony. The effective chanting vocals throughout the piece also callback to a traditional Japanese wedding song that’s typically sung to help rid evil spirits. Kawai’s original intention was to use Bulgarian folk singers to honor what he was pulling from, but instead went with Japanese folk singers, which ends up mixing these styles even further. With such a deep collaboration of influences here, it’s easy to see why the song makes such an impression and conjures chills whenever it comes up in the film. Symphony conductor Sarah Penicka-Smith notes that the song's lyrics are fitting for the union between ________ and _______ ____at the climax of the movie.
  117. 117. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  118. 118. 12. Ghost in the Shell - Making of a cyborg
  119. 119. 13. The __________ Award is an award given by the Public Language Award Committee of the National Council of Teachers of English for "ironic tribute to public speakers who have perpetuated language that is grossly deceptive, evasive, euphemistic, confusing, or self-centered", i.e. those who have engaged in __________. Its opposite, awarded by the same body, is the ______ Award for authors, editors, or producers of a print or non-print work that "contributes to honesty and clarity in public language". The award is interestingly named after an author known for calling out societal truths and transgressions through their works.
  120. 120. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  121. 121. 13. Doublespeak Awards Orwell Awards
  122. 122. 14. Sergei Fedorov is one of the most well known and celebrated Russian hockey players in the world and was inducted in the NHL’s Hall of Fame in 2015. He joined the NHL after being drafted in 1989, and much as any other foreign national, worked his way through with his exceptional skills and a slowly improving and slightly wonky English that led to just minor mishaps - most that just ended up adding to his charm. One of these mishaps happened in his rookie year, when he was rooming with Shawn Burr on the road for their away games. During this mishap, Fedorov had reached out to Burr and asked him for something that he needed. Burr, flustered, thought maybe it was a case of something lost in translation, and said he couldn’t help him out. So Fedorov went on to ask the same from multiple other teammates only to end up with the same answer - they couldn’t help him on this front. Fedorov was confused, and the team’s managerial staff was wondering about how thoroughly they had scouted him, until the mystery was resolved with a Russian-English dictionary. What was this something, that can be seen as an essential, that made people so flustered? Give both the words - what Fedorov wanted and what he said he wanted.
  123. 123. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  124. 124. 14. “I need love” when he meant “glove”
  125. 125. 15. In the cake scene in Coraline, an interesting decision with the way the cursive words are written on the cake hint at the lie that’s being told - that they’re welcome, but she’s not home. Of course, this is said to be so according to _____________, which while the analysis does fit here appropriately, is also usually perceived to be a pseudoscience. FITB + tell what led to this analysis.
  126. 126. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  127. 127. Graphology + the double loops on the ‘o’ in home (according to graphology, double loops means that the person who has written it is lying)
  128. 128. 16. While Hedy Lamarr is perhaps best known as an actress, acting in films such as H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941) and Samson and Delilah (1949), having her name engraved with a star at the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960, she has also been posthumously inducted in the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Originally born in Austria-Hungary, she migrated to the United States with her mother after the Nazis annexed Austria. While she had been acting since young, she also had an interest in trying her hand at inventing different devices and technologies. During the wartime, she wanted to lend a hand and join the National Inventors Council, but was reportedly instead told to help by using her celebrity status to sell war bonds. While she did follow that advice and helped sell war bonds, her desire for invention didn’t die, and along with her friend, composer and pianist George Antheil, they managed to create a device that had a frequency-hopping signal, which allowed it to avoid being jammed. This stemmed from her hearing about the radio-controlled torpedoes, an emerging technology in naval war, could easily be jammed and set off course. Although the US army didn’t adopt the technology, even after it was patented in 1942, they did later use an upgraded version of it in 1962. What’s even more interesting is how this technology’s techniques are still being incorporated in some of the technology that we make use of today - how is it seen today?
  129. 129. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  130. 130. It’s used in bluetooth and and legacy versions of Wi-Fi
  131. 131. 17. The Six Grandfathers was a sacred Lakota site located in the Black Hills, the ancestral lands promised to the Lakota in the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty. As Six Grandfathers, the mountain was part of the route that Lakota leader Black Elk took in a spiritual journey that culminated at Black Elk Peak. However, in 1876-78, through various military campaigns, the United States took control over the territory that was supposed to be a part of the Great Sioux Reservation as they found gold in the area. Much like a microcosm of America’s history, once the territory was taken over, expeditions began and in the next 60 odd years, the identity of that site had changed. This change, of course, involved participation and oversight from redneck Americans, especially one who was also a part of, or at least a supporter of, the KKK. What has the site become now?
  132. 132. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  133. 133. 17. Mount Rushmore
  134. 134. 18. Rea Irvin was an American artist working in New York in the 20th century. In 1924, he was working on the launch of a certain product. The final details of the product had been laid out, however, something very crucial was missing. To meet this requirement, Irvin created a certain character which makes annual appearances (except a few years) on a certain very commonly seen platform, in some form or the other. This theatrical character has a name (given later by Corey Ford), however, no one has been able to trace with surety who it is based on. Moreover, in this product’s universe, this is not the only fake character- Owen Ketherry, who some of the product’s clients have conversed with , is another fake character. Some speculate that the character created by Irvin is based on Comte d’Orsay, who has been described as ‘while an amateur painter and sculptor of modest attainment, was a calculating social climber and parasite of somewhat more conspicuous success’ or a ‘dandy and man of fashion’. Who could this character created by Irvin be?
  135. 135. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  136. 136. Eustace Tilley, the New Yorker dandy
  137. 137. 19. Rudi Dutschke was a German Marxist sociologist who was most well known as a spokesperson and political activist during the German student movement that took place in the late 1960s. In the 1970s, he also ended up joining the emerging Green movement that was focused on ecopolitics. His socialist beliefs had strong Christian roots and he believed that Jesus Christ was, in fact, the greatest revolutionary. This mix of ideologies takes a very literal representation in the name he gave to his first son, Hosea-___ Dutschke. Hosea is a Minor Prophet from the Old Christian Testament and is often seen as a “prophet of doom,” although underneath his message of destruction is a promise of restoration. The second person that Dutschke named his son after represents his socio-political beliefs, and is perhaps a quintessential icon in Dutschke’s political belief sphere. Who is this second person? FITB.
  138. 138. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  139. 139. Che Guevara - so Hosea-Che Dutschke
  140. 140. 20. In an almost peculiar twist of events in history, the popularity of square dancing in US is inextricably linked to Henry Ford’s staunch dislike for jazz dancing. In fact, Ford was so hellbent on pushing square dancing in place of it that he poured tons of money into square dancing and country music in general. In 1926, he published an instruction manual for aspiring square dancing instructors titled “Good Morning: After a Sleep of Twenty-Five Years, Old-Fashioned Dancing is Being Revived by Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ford.” He also required his employees to attend the square dancing events he created for them, funded fiddling contests and radio shows promoting “old time dancing music,” as well as the creation of square dancing clubs across the US. In all his efforts, Ford only managed to become semi-successful as he never really was able to supplant jazz, but he did manage to spark a revival of interest in square dancing. Why did Ford so adamantly believe that jazz dancing was the harbinger of moral decay and all sins and evils in America?
  141. 141. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  142. 142. He believed Jazz was created by Jews and he was an anti-Semite :) (also racist, bc while he didn’t believe that Blacks were particularly evil like Jews, he did think they weren’t smart and could be easily manipulated by the Jews and their evil Jazz music and dance) “Popular music is a Jewish monopoly. Jazz is a Jewish creation. The mush, slush, the sly suggestion, the abandoned sensuousness of sliding notes, are of Jewish origin”
  143. 143. 21. Bong Joonho is perhaps one of the last people we’d expect to have worked with Harvey Weinstein, but as life has it, they did sort of end up working together for Bong’s first English- language film debut, Snowpiercer. The distribution rights for the film were acquired by The Weinstein Company and there were plans for a wide release of it. However, a minor dispute occurred between Bong and Weinstein (in which Bong emerged victorious, and then began to include a clause in all his future deals that would help avoid the same situation as he had dealt with Weinstein, #neveragain) that led to the distributors being switched to Radius-TWC, which meant the film only received a limited release in art house cinemas. Knowing Bong’s style of directing, wherein he makes storyboard sketches of all his scenes and shoots precisely those scenes as he wants them, thus cutting out the unnecessary multiple angle filming and extra footage editing, and knowing his indifference towards superhero movies, what was the source of the dispute between Bong and Weinstein that, in the midst of it all, leading up to it had Bong lie to Weinstein that his father was a fisherman?
  144. 144. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  145. 145. Weinstein wanted to cut out a lot of the movie (20 minutes of it) and instead include more action + monologue scenes. Bong always likes having his director’s cut. Bong lied about his father being a fisherman to save a particular scene that he really liked from being cut in the initial reviews by invoking some family sentimentality in Weinstein.
  146. 146. 22. The American rapper Eminem released his eleventh studio album on January 17, 2020 titled _____ __ __ ________ __. The album's title and alternative cover art share the same concept as the 1958 Jeff Alexander album ______ _________ presents _____ __ __ ________ __ , described by Chris Willman of Variety as "the one and only album _________ever released". The album is dedicated to American rapper Juice Wrld, who died from an accidental drug overdose on December 8, 2019, and Eminem's former bodyguard CeeAaqil Allah Barnes who also died. These are some audio files that form the intro and the outro of the album to help you get to the name of the album and the person the album pays a tribute.
  147. 147. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  148. 148. 22. Music to be Murdered By Alfred Hitchcock
  149. 149. 23. In May 1970, a few months after the show began airing, the Board of the State Commission for Educational Television vetoed the showing with a member stating that “Mainly the Commission members that Mississippi was not yet ready for it.” The five-member panel of the Board consisted of educators and private citizens, including a teacher and a principal, and was headed up by James McKay, a banker in Jackson, Mississippi. McKay’s presence was notable for the fact that his father-in-law, Allen Thompson, had just retired after spending 20 years as mayor of Jackson. Highly resistant to integration in the city during his tenure in office, Thompson was also the founder of Freedom of Choice in the United States, or FOCUS, an activist group that promoted what they dubbed “freedom of choice” in public schools—a thinly veiled reference to ___________. Name the show and why it was banned?
  150. 150. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  151. 151. Sesame Street It was considered too controversial because on the series, the human cast was integrated, with black performers Matt Robinson and Loretta Long as Gordon and Susan, respectively, appearing alongside white actors Jada Rowland and Bob McGrath. The children of Sesame Street were also ethnically diverse.
  152. 152. 24. The band X is a rock band based out of England. They chose the name X because of its "stylistic implications and association." The band also chose the same typeface used on the X college building in Dessau, Germany. ID X.
  153. 153. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  154. 154. Bauhaus
  155. 155. 25. Robert McCulloch, President of the McCulloch Oil Company, has been famous for the ambitious accomplishment of developing Lake Havasu City in the Arizona Desert on the shores of the Colorado river. As the crowning touch for the project, Mr. McCulloch, a native of St. Louis, bought the 19th century ______ ______ on April 18, 1968, from the Corporation of London for $2,460,000 and had it brought to the United States, stone by stone, for reconstruction hoping to attract tourists and prospective buyers of residential lots. The construction took three years to complete. Since its inauguration on October 5, 1971, ______ ______ has become the second-largest tourist attraction in Arizona, after the Grand Canyon.
  156. 156. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  157. 157. London Bridge (is falling down, falling down, falling down)
  158. 158. 26. The Kanji of the year is a Japanese character chosen by the Japanese Kanji Proficiency Society through a national ballet in Japan. The character with the most votes, selected to represent the events of that year wins. The 2016 Kanji was 金 read as kin or kane meaning gold. The character was chosen as a representation of two particular events that took place that year and one viral video that has been viewed almost 136 Million times. Give the three “golden” reasons.
  159. 159. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  160. 160. 26. ○ Japan winning high number of gold medals at the Rio Olympics ○ Donald Trump winning the U.S. Presidential elections (“blond hair” is “kinpatsu”) ○ Pikotaro (Daimaou Kosaka), the singer of PPAP known for wearing the gold-coloured animal print outfit.
  161. 161. 27. Nigel Goode, lead aviation designer and co-founder at Priestman Goode, which has been delivering aircraft interiors for 30 years for airlines, including most recently the Airbus Airspace, states: "Our job as designers is to reinforce the airline’s brand and make it more recognisable, but our primary concern is to deliver an interior that maximises comfort to create a pleasant environment.” Aircraft manufacturer Boeing, explained their psychological approach to the cabin: "the idea is to give airplanes a more residential feeling, with relaxing ______ and restful _______." What, almost constant, aircraft feature is being talked about?
  162. 162. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  163. 163. (Most) Airline seats being blue (=calm)
  164. 164. 28. On September 12, 1895, a Nebraskan named Jessie Allan died of Tuberculosis. Such deaths were a common occurrence at the turn of the 20th century, but Allan’s case of “consumption” “reportedly” came from an unusual source. She was a ________. A wave of legislation in the United Kingdom sought to attack the problem. Although the Public Health Act of 1875 didn’t refer specifically to _____ ____, it did prohibit lending “bedding clothing rags or other things” that had been exposed to infection. The law was updated in 1907 with explicit reference to the dangers of spreading disease via ____ ____. In response, numerous methods were used for disinfecting ____, including holding the _____ in vapor from “carbolic acid crystals heated in an oven” in Sheffield, England, and sterilization via “formaldehyde solution” in Pennsylvania, according to Greenberg. In New York, ____ were disinfected with steam. Concerns like these are probably circulating again due to coronavirus and considering our immediate environment.
  165. 165. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  166. 166. 28. Library books were blamed for spreading deadly diseases
  167. 167. 29. ___ _____ ___________ is an American comedy rock band consisting of Macaulay Culkin, Matt Colbourn, Phoebe Kreutz, Deenah Vollmer and Austin Kilham. Deenah Vollmer said the idea for ___ _____ ___________ began as a joke in 2012 as they “soon realized you can replace most any word with slice or cheese.” Some of their songs include All _____ Parties, _____ Gal, Take a bite of the wild _____, all of them playing on/parodying famous ___ ______ ___________ songs (a popular band of the 60s-70s). Give the band name, a play on the band they’re parodying.
  168. 168. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  169. 169. 29. The Pizza Underground
  170. 170. 30. This popular journalist has been working in conflict zones for two decades. His most appreciated works include those set in the Iraq war where he traveled with the US Marines and the Afghanistan War. He has published books, photo-essays and articles for various publications. Recently, his work has gained popularity after the assassination of general Qassem Soleimani. A lot of people in India believe that certain activities he undertook in India were illegal and they demand action against it. The government of India appears to share some of the hostility, with his VISA for travel to India being rejected just before an important event earlier this year. ID this journalist.
  171. 171. SAFETY! DON’T SUMMON SPIRITS KIDS! (or at least be safe when doing so!)
  172. 172. 30. Dexter Filkins

Editor's Notes

  • I like it lol
    Heh thankyou for humoring me, i like it cuz it’s so dumb
  • Related to publication, where their stories, sometimes shocking/unconventional debuts were published
    Ray Bradbury
  • X and Y are two entities/states/territories that create portmanteaus like brangelina and angelinad (not gelinabra)
  • No hints lol, except that this person's death was important from a legal perspective too
  • And iiiiiiiiiiiii will always looooooove yoouuUUUUUUU
    hints, wow
  • https://twitter.com/benkesslen/status/1220381668231602178
  • https://twitter.com/benkesslen/status/1220381668231602178
  • https://www.businessinsider.in/science/space/theres-an-amazing-mental-phenomenon-that-happens-to-astronauts-when-they-see-earth-from-space/articleshow/48748971.cms
  • https://amentian.com/post/7XYx
  • https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/what-other-countries-call-at-symbol/
  • A major inspiration for the show would be Full House
  • IRONIC
  • The ‘unfinished’ quality characterizes the artist's other work too, and is a big hint towards knowing why it's imp in art history
  • Punjabi music is a big hint
  • Looking for the show and the documentary
  • I like it lol
    Heh thankyou for humoring me, i like it cuz it’s so dumb
  • Related to publication, where their stories, sometimes shocking/unconventional debuts were published
    Ray Bradbury
  • X and Y are two entities/states/territories that create portmanteaus like brangelina and angelinad (not gelinabra)
  • And iiiiiiiiiiiii will always looooooove yoouuUUUUUUU
  • https://twitter.com/benkesslen/status/1220381668231602178
  • https://twitter.com/benkesslen/status/1220381668231602178
  • https://www.businessinsider.in/science/space/theres-an-amazing-mental-phenomenon-that-happens-to-astronauts-when-they-see-earth-from-space/articleshow/48748971.cms
  • https://amentian.com/post/7XYx
  • https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/what-other-countries-call-at-symbol/
  • A major inspiration for the show would be Full House
  • IRONIC
  • Looking for the show and the documentary
  • https://twitter.com/philistella/status/1224362347675910144
  • When George Stephenson designed the Stockton & Darlington Railway in the north of England in 1825, he used a gauge of 4 feet, 8 inches simply because he had been familiar with it on a mine tramway called the Willington Way on the Tyne River below Newcastle. In turn, the Willington Way had been built to this gauge because it was common on roads in the area. After the Stockton & Darlington, Stephenson used the same 4 feet, 8 inches for the Liverpool & Manchester, the world's first railway between major cities. There he widened the gauge by one-half inch, probably to give more lateral play to the flanges.

    At the outset, the choice of 4 feet 8-1/2 appeared arbitrary. The tramways of the Newcastle area had a variety of other gauges, wider and narrower, any of which Stephenson might have chosen.

    By the 1870's, archeological excavations at Pompeii and elsewhere were revealing that the gauge Stephenson chose may have been the approximate gauge of Roman road vehicles. In a famous episode, an American engineer, Walton W. Evans, sought to test this hypothesis by measuring with a metric rule - so as to avoid bias - the ruts made by carts and chariots at Pompeii. He converted his measurements to inches and found that the ruts, center to center, were about 4 feet, 9 inches, consistent with a gauge of slightly less than that. Later archeology confirmed that this was the Romans' common gauge.
    https://trn.trains.com/railroads/abcs-of-railroading/2006/05/a-history-of-track-gauge https://twitter.com/BillHolohanSolr/status/1177631604186996737
  • Lots of hints
    The author X CBSE students have read
    This actor is dead and thus movie is absolutely iconic
    The author on whose novel the movie is based on, NOT X, has invented a fictional town in his books (giveaway)
  • Patti Smith
    Tina Turner
    Yoko Ono
    Aretha Franklin
    Nona Hendryx
  • https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/worlds-first-underwater-post-office-180964385/
  • The lack of clarity was the point.
    Second, we had shifted from the language of opportunity to a language of threats. I filed away my “UNLOCK THE IMPOSSIBLE” stickers and adjusted to “protect our sovereignty” in an “extraordinarily dangerous world.”
    And third, unlike the sports-team lexicon of the Obama White House, there was no longer a “team” at all. In the Trump administration, national security priorities were indistinguishable from personal interests.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/i-worked-for-both-obama-and-trump-heres-what-their-language-says-about-their-presidencies/2019/10/03/848c6042-e5e9-11e9-a331-2df12d56a80b_story.html
  • We want the movie and the opening/recurring theme
  • Basically, when a person says something but means something else. It’s also a compound word
    If you’ve figured out the second one, you should be able to get to the second part of the compound. The author is also known for creating some famous compound words
  • https://vault.si.com/vault/1994/01/24/a-red-hot-wing-its-no-reach-to-say-that-detroits-sergei-fedorov-is-the-worlds-top-two-way-player
  • Owen Ketherry can give you the answer alone
    Focus on dandy and man of fashion- most of us have used this product and if you have you'll see the character
  • https://qz.com/1153516/americas-wholesome-square-dancing-tradition-is-a-tool-of-white-supremacy/
  • https://www.vulture.com/2019/10/bong-joon-ho-parasite.html
  • Educational Television
    Mississippi in the 70s
  • If you know french, you can get to the answer more easily (what????)
    But anyway, Germany is a big hint!
  • I would also consider this question gold
  • Blanks not indicative
  • BLANKS INDICATIVE
  • Darling of the Indian left
    Very politically sensitive work in India
  • ×