In our journey as the Junior team we are an Reggio Emilia
inspired school. We use The ECE curriculum, TeWhariki and the
NZ...
their learning, negotiating with everything their environment
brings to them. They are driven by their interests to unders...
The environment is the third teacher
The environment is recognised for its potential to inspire
children. An environment f...
The teacher as researcher.
As a team of 3 experience teachers in one space we work to
maintain strong, collegial relations...
The parent as partner
Parent participation is considered essential and takes many forms.
Parents play an active role in th...
when I wave my arms.„ or
▪ you may just notice them doing something intently, like playing
with their shadow.
This is your...
Now you can start gathering your materials. What you will
need will depend on what you are exploring. If it‟s something re...
As much as possible, try to include natural materials in your
activity. Natural materials are not only beautiful, they app...
How does the activity look?
When you are arranging an activity, think about how the
activity looks.
▪ Does it make you wan...
Define your work area
Next, define the work area. When you define the work area with
a mat or a tray you draw your child‟s...
Other suggestions:
Join Reanz
Pinterest – Reggio
Google some preschools and Primary schools who are inspired
by Reggio
Con...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

HPP Reggio Approach

880 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
880
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

HPP Reggio Approach

  1. 1. In our journey as the Junior team we are an Reggio Emilia inspired school. We use The ECE curriculum, TeWhariki and the NZC. We use all the “normal” assessments including completing the 5 year entry test for new students. However this does not drive our Teaching and Learning. We are inspired by the work of ECE centres, and parents as the First teachers along with Reggio Emilia. Background The Reggio Emilia Approach originated in the town (and surrounding areas) of Reggio Emilia in Italy out of a movement towards progressive and cooperative early childhood education. It is unique to Reggio Emilia, it is not a method, there are no international training colleges to train to be a Reggio Emilia teacher. Outside of the town of Reggio Emilia, all schools and preschools (and home schools) are Reggio-inspired, using an adaptation of the approach specific to the needs of their community. This is important as each student, teacher, parent, community, and town are different. No two Reggio-inspired communities should look the same as the needs and interests of the children within each community will be different. Part of the reason for this is that we are not in Italy we are in NZ and as such our cultural influence is reflected in a different way again. Fundamental Principles that we have made our own Children are capable of constructing their own learning Children are views as strong, rich and capable; as having preparedness, potential, curiosity, and interest in constructing
  2. 2. their learning, negotiating with everything their environment brings to them. They are driven by their interests to understand and know more. We begun by making decisions about our curriculum demands based on children‟s interest rather than on a predetermined weekly theme. Setting daily goals and reflecting on them at the end of the day have become something that we value. A great way to have parents involved in what their child has learnt that day as they come to the “campfire” to pick up their kids and will hear the discussion. Children form an understanding of themselves and their place in the world through their interactions with others There is a strong focus on social collaboration, working in groups, where each child is an equal participant, having their thoughts and questions valued. The adult is not the giver of knowledge. Children search out the knowledge through their own investigations. This is where our project work comes in see attatched examples. Both student and teacher trackers. The child as communicator and collaborator Communication is a process, a way of discovering things, asking questions, using language as play. Playing with sounds and rhythm and rhyme; delighting in the process of communicating. Children are encouraged to use language to investigate and explore, to reflect on their experiences. They are listened to with respect, believing that their questions and observations are an opportunity to learn and search together. It is a process, a continual process. A collaborative process rather than the child asking a question and the adult offering the answers. The search is undertaken together.
  3. 3. The environment is the third teacher The environment is recognised for its potential to inspire children. An environment filled with natural light, order and beauty. Open spaces free from clutter, where every material is considered for its purpose, every corner is ever-evolving to encourage children to delve deeper and deeper into their interests. The space encourages collaboration, communication and exploration. The space respects children as capable by providing them with authentic materials & tools. Also similarly to Montessori, the space is cared for by the children and the adults. For many projects this was the starting point. The desire was to make the rooms more home-like, and more beautiful. Storage space for long-term projects is a challenge. So is wall space for documentation. Time is a significant element also. We have slowed down the pace, provided larger blocks of time for children, and revisited earlier ideas rather than moving on to something new. We are not constricted to term plans. Currently this is our team of teachers goal to learn how to develop rich learning areas that will provoke a project of learning. The adult is a mentor and guide Our role as adults is to observe (our) children, listen to their questions and their stories, find what interests them and then provide them with opportunities to explore these interests further. Reggio Emilia takes a child-led project approach. The projects aren‟t planned in advanced, they emerge based on the child‟s interests.
  4. 4. The teacher as researcher. As a team of 3 experience teachers in one space we work to maintain strong, collegial relationships with each other. We engage in continuous discussion and interpretation of our work and the work of the children. These exchanges provide ongoing training and theoretical enrichment. Teachers see themselves as researchers/learners. We are advisors/coaches and supporters of others leading in the teaching role. We seek to upskill ourselves in setting both team and individual goals. These goals are collaborative and targeted certainly not imposed. Junior team goals are professional readings in Reggio, Developing the 3rd teacher space – both indoor and outdoor spaces. What/How should our documentation of our children‟s learning be recorded and shared? An emphasis on documenting children‟s thoughts In Reggio and Reggio-inspired settings that there is an emphasis on carefully displaying and documenting children‟s thoughts and progression of thinking; making their thoughts visible in many different ways: photographs, transcripts of children‟s thoughts and explanations, visual representations (drawings, sculptures etc.) all designed to show the child‟s learning process. This remains a team goal.
  5. 5. The parent as partner Parent participation is considered essential and takes many forms. Parents play an active role in their children‟s learningexperience.The ideas and skills that the families bring to the school and, even more important the exchange of ideas between parents and teachers, favour the development of a new way of educating, which helps teachers to view the participation of the families not as a threat but as an instrinsic element of collegiality and as the integration of different wisdoms. Thinking therefore that if you have an open door policy then take full advantage of parents been available to take workshops and support in the classroom as oppose to been locked away filing books. Far more powerful to be working alongside parents. Some practical tips: Setting up a Reggio-inspired Activity Start with a question Reggio inspired activities are about exploration and discovery; exploring with their senses, asking questions, testing theories, making plans and thinking deeply. When you are setting up a provocation (an inquiry or discovery activity) have a think about some of the questions your child has been asking lately. What have they been wondering about? ▪ They might ask you straight up, „Why does my shadow stick to me?„ or ▪ theymight say a statement, ‟Hey Mummy, look at my shadow
  6. 6. when I wave my arms.„ or ▪ you may just notice them doing something intently, like playing with their shadow. This is your cue, your opportunity to provide an experience which will engage their interests. From there, get some idea of what your child already knows about the subject. Depending on their age you can do a brainstorm where you discuss what you know and make a mind map. For younger children, what they understand will probably come through in their play, drawings and paintings. Make notes of these as well as any misconceptions they may have, this will help you to plan an activity/inquiry that really relates to what your child knows or wants to know. Plan your activity Now thinking about what they want to know and what they already know, you can start to plan your activity/inquiry. Is your activity going to be an observation like our Snail inquiry? ▪ A sensory exploration like this large painting activity? Or this scented discovery basket? ▪ Exploring a new material/art medium like this exploration of paint? Or this one with clay? ▪ An observational painting or drawing activity like this one of van Gogh‟s Starry Night? ▪ A discovery activity like this nature walk? Gather your materials
  7. 7. Now you can start gathering your materials. What you will need will depend on what you are exploring. If it‟s something real (in nature or around the neighbourhood), then head out for a walk if you can to explore the real thing. Connect the activity to your child‟s interests ‘You were asking about ant nests yesterday. Let’s go for a walk and see if we can find some.’ Take along a notebook and pencil for sketching, a bag to carry any treasures and go explore. Listen to what your child is talking about, notice what they are doing, these little clues will help you to continue the exploration when you get home. Presenting an Activity (A Provocation)
  8. 8. As much as possible, try to include natural materials in your activity. Natural materials are not only beautiful, they appeal deeply to our senses; their colour, texture, smell and even taste are far more engaging than plastic alternatives. Baskets and bowls as well as glass vases can be picked up inexpensively at charity stores. Try using: ▪ cane baskets ▪ wooden bowls ▪ wooden trays ▪ water ▪ flowers and plants ▪ leaves, pinecones, sticks, rocks
  9. 9. How does the activity look? When you are arranging an activity, think about how the activity looks. ▪ Does it make you want to play too? ▪ Would you be attracted to this activity? ▪ Can you see everything that is available? ▪ Do you have some idea of what you might do with this activity?
  10. 10. Define your work area Next, define the work area. When you define the work area with a mat or a tray you draw your child‟s attention in, they will move to that area. Try using: ▪ A small cloth placemat like the one in the math provocation above ▪ A hard surface for building with blocks ▪ A mirror like in this observational painting activity Gather and group your materials Then, group your materials around your work area. Use wooden trays or baskets to keep similar materials together.
  11. 11. Other suggestions: Join Reanz Pinterest – Reggio Google some preschools and Primary schools who are inspired by Reggio Contact me for further referrals

×