The effects of preschool attendance

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  • Dear Mr or Ms., I am now doing thesis to fulfil the requirement of masteral degree in ECE. I found this is so related to the topic of my interest. Would you mind recommend me where i can have full paper of this study? thxs before hand :)
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The effects of preschool attendance

  1. 1. on School Readinessand Future Academic Performance
  2. 2. By Lisa Schira EDC 501
  3. 3. Introduction: Does preschool attendance enhance school readiness and future academic achievement?
  4. 4. Introduction cont’d: Most studies show that attending a high-quality early learning program strengthens kindergarten readiness and long term academic performance. Quality was implicated as the defining factor of a successful preschool program but those studied were inconsistent.
  5. 5. Introduction cont’d: What does a high-quality preschool program look like? Can we insure the level of quality in early childhood education and therefore lessen the varying degrees of effectiveness? Can high-quality programs be widely and equally accessible to diverse populations? Can other forms of early intervention be as effective in positively enhancing school readiness as preschool attendance?
  6. 6. Research Methods: Compare/Contrast Diverse populations of children Those that have attended preschool and those that have not
  7. 7. Research Methods Cont’d: Analysis of Variance  Kindergarten Skills (ANOVA) Assessments Standard Deviation  Grade-level Proficiency Two-way MANOVA Tests Chi-Square Test  Graduation rates
  8. 8. Research Methods Cont’d: California Standards Tests Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program Developmental Reading Assessment, Second Edition
  9. 9. Research Methods cont’d: Regression-discontinuity design Time-series design Pre-post design Longitudinal study design Quasi-experimental pre-post treatment design Descriptive method based on relational survey model
  10. 10. In most cases, attending preschool significantly enhancedschool readiness and academic achievement in the long-term.
  11. 11. Resultscont’d: Variables such as race-ethnicity, English-language fluency, parent education and economic status can effect proficiency in key subjects Disadvantaged children are more likely to start school behind and stay behind Disadvantaged children are the least likely to attend high- quality, center-based preschool programs Preschool appears promising for narrowing achievement gaps
  12. 12. Results cont’d: Supportive parental role has positive effects on children’s learning Engaging in activities at home such as reading, painting, drawing, singing, and learning numbers have a big impact on children’s kindergarten readiness Literacy-rich environments correlates most closely with children’s early literacy ability than any other factor
  13. 13. Results cont’d:Reading Achievement Reading achievement scores were consistently higher for children in early childhood Reading Achievement education programs. 150 140 130 120 Received Preschool No Preschool 110 100 90 Grade 3 Grade 5 Grade 8
  14. 14. Results cont’d: Children from quality 55% early learning settings 48% have been shown to 36% realize sizeable and 31% preschool program enduring achievements 25% in the long-term. no 14% preschool program Attended 4 Retained in Placed in yr college grade special education
  15. 15. Discussion: Increase access, especially for underserved groups Raise quality across the board, especially for dimensions with the biggest shortfalls Advance toward a more efficient and coordinated system Provide infrastructure supports
  16. 16. Discussion cont’d: Continue with best practice early childhood education policies in the classroom Connect with parents and empower them to support their child’s learning Continually enhance a literacy-rich classroom environment Continue to advocate for quality early learning programs
  17. 17. Discussion cont’d: It seems there is a significant difference in the academic performance of children who attend a well-designed preschool program with a curriculum that includes all developmentally appropriate domains facilitated by a professional teacher in a safe, literacy-rich environment.
  18. 18. Discussion cont’d: The hypothesis is supported by the literature reviewed Future research may be more conclusive by limiting variables
  19. 19. References: Barnett,W.S (2008). Preschool education and it’s lasting effects: Research and policy implications. Boulder and Tempe: Education and Public Interest Center & Education Policy and research Unit. Retrieved October 21, 2011 from http://epicpolicy.org/publication/preschool-education Bowens-McCarthy, Patricia and Morote, Elsa Sophia (2009). The link between investment in early childhood preschools and high school graduation rates for African-American males in the United States of America. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 10, 232-39. Brown, Jen (2002). The Link Between Early Learning and Care and School Readiness. Economic Opportunity Institute. Retrieved October 11, 2011 from http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6006041 Canno, Jill S. and Karoly, Lynn A. The Promise of Preschool for Narrowing Readiness and Achievement Gaps Among California Children. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, 2007. Dunlap, Katherine M. (1997). Family Empowerment: One outcome of cooperative preschool education. Child Welfare, Vol. 76(4), 501-18.
  20. 20. References cont’d: Fails Nelson, Regina (2005).The Impact of Ready Environments on Achievement in Kindergarten. Journal of Research in Childhood Education , 19(3), 215-21. Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted; Phillips, Deborah; Dawson, Brittany (2005). The effects of universal pre-K on cognitive development. Developmental Psychology, 41(6), 872-84. Gulay, Hulya; Ackman, Berrin and Kargi, Eda (2001). Social skills of first grade primary students and preschool education. Education, 131,663-79. Karoly, Lynn A. Strategies for Advancing Preschool Adequacy and Efficiency in California. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, 2009. Taylor, Katherine Kees, Gibbs, Albert S., and Slate, John R. (2000). Preschool Attendance and Kindergarten Readiness. Early Childhood Education Journal, 27(3), 191-95.
  21. 21. References cont’d:Volenti, Joy E. and Tracey, Diane H. (2009). Full-day, Half-day and No Preschool; Effects on Urban Children’s First-Grade Reading Achievement. Education and Urban Society, 41(6), 695-711.Ward, Helen (2008). Preschool learning holds the key to children’s success later in life. The Times Educational Supplement, no. 4817, 22-23.Yoshikawa, Hirokazu, Ph.D. (2009). The Science Of Early Childhood development and the Foundations of Prosperity. Paper presented at the Maine Business Leaders Summit on Early Childhood, Portland and Bath, ME, September 24, 2009.

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