Consideration for our Studentswith Autism Spectrum Disorders                      Ethical Concerns  Presenter: Lora Scheler
Our objectives:• To define ethics in educating all students,  specifically with ASDs.• To identify what we can do as educa...
Group A & B Discussions:What types of learners are in your class?What are some ways to organize your classroom, so that al...
Build Trust• Turnball and colleagues (2006) describe partnerships between  families and professionals as relationships in ...
Prevent problems                                Be sensitive to emotional needs                   Keep your conscience pri...
Our ethical obligation……..As teachers, it is our ethical obligation to practice cognitive flexibility andattempt the use o...
What works for one, may not     work for the other!• Visual Aids ~ what are these?        • Pay attention to processing an...
What works for one, maycontinuation of:           not work for the other!   •Encourage independent effort and incorporate ...
Group A ScenarioJohn is a 10th grader in your World History class this year. You areaware of his disability and have a sna...
Group B ScenarioLane is a 9th grader who is diagnosed with Asperger’s. He is in your study skills classto work on his home...
What can I try differently next time?No single classroom management approach is successful for allstudents. Students’ need...
One of the most effective ways teachers canprepare for the inclusion of a student with ASD isto develop an understanding a...
References:Pierangelo, R., & Giuliani, G. (2008). Teaching students with autism spectrum   disorders: A step-by-step guide...
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Consideration for our students with autism spectrum disorders

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  • Discussion for all: How do we use these accommodations and supplementary aides in our class? Demonstrate how they may look when used effectively.
  • How do these look when used in the classroom?
  • Consideration for our students with autism spectrum disorders

    1. 1. Consideration for our Studentswith Autism Spectrum Disorders Ethical Concerns Presenter: Lora Scheler
    2. 2. Our objectives:• To define ethics in educating all students, specifically with ASDs.• To identify what we can do as educators when building our working relationship with students and their families• Understanding how we may solve situations which may have legal and ethical consequences
    3. 3. Group A & B Discussions:What types of learners are in your class?What are some ways to organize your classroom, so that all studentsare able to effectively learn?What qualities help us to become effective teachers?What qualities help us build working relationships with special education students andtheir families?
    4. 4. Build Trust• Turnball and colleagues (2006) describe partnerships between families and professionals as relationships in which there is mutual agreement to defer to each other’s judgments and expertise as appropriate for securing outcome for students, other family members, and professionals. They describe an effective partnership with the visual aid of an arch with trust as the keystone. Trust is built when partners communicate in open and honest ways, when there is mutual respect, when there is a commitment, when power and advocacy are shared, and when professionals are competent in providing a quality education. (Turnball, 2006)
    5. 5. Prevent problems Be sensitive to emotional needs Keep your conscience primed Be available and accessible Pinpoint & document problems Go “above & beyond” Create win-win situations RespectHonor cultural diversity Trust Commitment Share power FosterAffirm strengths empowermentTreat students & families Provide optionswith dignity Professional Competence •Be reliable Equality •Use sound judgment •Maintain Confidentiality Be friendly, Listen, be clear, •Trust Yourself Provide quality Education Be honest, provide Continue to learn And coordinate Communication Advocacy Set high expectations information (Turnball, 2006) & (Hall, 2009)
    6. 6. Our ethical obligation……..As teachers, it is our ethical obligation to practice cognitive flexibility andattempt the use of many learning strategies & tools for all students.
    7. 7. What works for one, may not work for the other!• Visual Aids ~ what are these? • Pay attention to processing and• Provide precise, positive praise pacing issues while the student is learning • Use concrete examples• Use meaningful reinforcements and hands-on activities• Plan tasks at an appropriate level • Use task analysis of difficulty • Use discrete trial methods• Use age-appropriate materials • Introduce unfamiliar tasks in a• Provide opportunities for choice familiar environment when• Break down oral instructions into possible small steps • Organize teaching materials and the situation to highlight what is important
    8. 8. What works for one, maycontinuation of: not work for the other! •Encourage independent effort and incorporate Proactive measures to reduce the likelihood of becoming dependent on prompts •Direct and broaden fixations into useful activities •Know the individual and maintain a list of strengths and interests •Develop talent and interest areas
    9. 9. Group A ScenarioJohn is a 10th grader in your World History class this year. You areaware of his disability and have a snapshot of his IEP accommodationsand supplementary aides.Due to budget cut-backs, you only have one paraeducator in the classroomto assist with the twelve special ed students.Today is their chapter 4 quiz and John should be receiving his “read entire”accommodation, along with three other special ed students, however,there is one student who requires a scribe.As the teacher, you decide to have the paraeducator scribe for the onestudent.You tell the other special ed students to “raise their hand if they needsomething read aloud on the exam”. You do not offer them the “readentire” accommodation that is indicated on their IEP.Is this a legal and/or ethical issue? What may be possible fallouts as aResult of your decision to implement accommodations or not? What areSolutions to managing this and similar situations?
    10. 10. Group B ScenarioLane is a 9th grader who is diagnosed with Asperger’s. He is in your study skills classto work on his homework, completion of class work assignments, and study/review for any upcoming exams. Lane is a very cooperative student who comes to classwith all his supplies and materials to do his work. He usually comes to class andbegins his assignments quickly and quietly. In the same class, is Lisa who struggleswith her organization and attention. She requires on-going, consistent support toorganize her work, initiate and maintain working on her assignments throughoutthe 80 minute class.You are the special education teacher in this class of seven students. You notice thatthe other six students make attempts to work on their individual assignments, however,they are in this class specifically to develop and fine-tune their study skills.your attention is taken up by Lisa almost every day for the entire class period.Is there a problem here?What is your ethical obligation in this situation?How can you better manage this situation, so that all students are given equalopportunity ?
    11. 11. What can I try differently next time?No single classroom management approach is successful for allstudents. Students’ needs change over time, making it necessaryfor teachers to try various approaches. (Pierangelo & Giuliani, 2008)Examine the instructional plan and noninstructional activities for problemareas that may result in sensory overload or frustration for thestudent. Make available sensory experiences that are calming for thestudent to accompany potentially frustrating tasks. Whenever possible,adapt tasks and materials to promote successful participation. Whenfeasible, decrease environmental distractions and reduce activities thatconfuse, disorient, or upset the student and interfere with learning.(Pierangelo & Giuliani, 2008)
    12. 12. One of the most effective ways teachers canprepare for the inclusion of a student with ASD isto develop an understanding about the disorderby obtaining accurate information.Having access to accurate information fostersunderstanding and facilitates a positive attitudetoward the challenge of including a student withASD.(Pierangelo, R. & Giuliani, G., 2008)
    13. 13. References:Pierangelo, R., & Giuliani, G. (2008). Teaching students with autism spectrum disorders: A step-by-step guide for educators. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.Turnbull, Ann; Turnbull, Rudi; Erwin, Elizabeth J.; Soodak, Leslie C. (2006). Families, professionals, and exceptionality: Positive outcomes through partnership and trust. Columbus, OH: Merill/Prentice Hall.

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