Online sentimentanalysis: <br />potentialities, criticalities, perspectives<br />Romana Andò<br />WARM: Workshop on Advanc...
WEB 2.0 : anamazingopportunityforresearch<br />we can use Web 2.0 toanalyzerelationships in SNS, asSocial Network Analysis...
Once upon a time…<br />Research project “TV++”, promotedby Fondazione Bordoni , Dipartimento per le comunicazioni del Mini...
Issues on the agenda<br />Whatissentimentanalysis?<br />To which contexts of use and objects of analysis has it been appli...
SentimentAnalysis 101<br />Whenanindividualisinterested in a media product, he/shewould<br />express evaluations in its re...
SentimentAnalysis 101<br />SentimentAnalysisappliesautomated analytical methods to web conversations  (within social media...
SentimentAnalysis 101<br />WithSentimentAnalysis,<br />We are ableto work withlarge-scale data, noteasilyrecoverablewithot...
Whatwe can do withSentimentAnalysis<br />We can certify the existence of a certain phenomena (it is not just the result of...
SentimentAnalysis 101<br />In the end, SentimentAnalysisis:<br />“…translating the vagaries of human emotion into hard dat...
Whyblogs?<br />Blogs and microblogs are greatly diffused on the Web<br />They are dynamic and open (i.e. VS message boards...
Sentiment analysis = Auditel + Qualitel?<br />
Desperatelyseeking audience<br />The quantitative research tools, in fact, offer to the researchers the illusory certainty...
Quickresearch a  immersiveresearch?<br />I still think that sentiment analysis could be viewed a bit too hastily as a way ...
Market research – Empiric sociological research. Hybridizations or rewritings?<br />
Whatquestionsshouldwe pose?  / 1<br />How do we differ from the companies that want to know the progress of their brand, w...
Whatquestionsshouldwe pose?  / 1<br />Dealing with media, we are aware of the difference between financial and cultural ec...
Whatquestionsshouldwe pose?  / 2<br />Tracing the life of a commercial product in the WOM is way easierthantracing the nev...
Whatquestionsshouldwe pose?  / 3<br />We are interested in audiences.<br />We are notonlyinterested in understandingwhatth...
Whatquestionsshouldwe pose?  / 3<br />Sincewe are cultural processes sociologists , we must ask ourselves whether it is en...
The roleoflexicon<br />Using different lexicons for research, some more oriented on understand the rating, others focused ...
The roles of context and social bond<br />
The roleofcontext<br />Thisis a theoretical problem, but also a methodological one: sentiment analysis researchers deal wi...
The roleofactiveusers<br />Another problem area is the need to filter the presence of really active users, who produce mos...
Personal Influence and SentimentAnalysis<br />Sentiment analysis is oriented towards the identification of influential ind...
The relationship impact<br />We need to focus more on the network of subjects and on the relationships between them (Socia...
Algorithms vs. ethnographic gaze <br />
Whatkindofgaze on Web research<br />The problem with Web research isn’t to have enough answers for a proper analysis, but ...
Serial IstinctResearch<br />Two years ago we were conducting the research Serial Instinct. Sulletracce fandom, with the sa...
Temporaryconclusion<br />
Whatweexpect<br />Reading in a very positive way the cultural contribution of Web 2.0, we should expect from these process...
Engagement is “coinvolgimento”<br />We often translate "engagement" with the term coinvolgimento which, in my opinion, ref...
Engagement is …<br />Engagement is in the task of decoding a text , <br />Engagement is spending time consuming a media pr...
Engagement is…<br />And above all, engagement is what drives the audience to perceive a seamless transition from a local e...
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Fare sentiment analysis nel web sociale

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Fare sentiment analysis nel web sociale.
Author: Romana Andò

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Fare sentiment analysis nel web sociale

  1. 1. Online sentimentanalysis: <br />potentialities, criticalities, perspectives<br />Romana Andò<br />WARM: Workshop on Advanced Research Methods<br />Urbino, 30 Settembre 2010<br />
  2. 2. WEB 2.0 : anamazingopportunityforresearch<br />we can use Web 2.0 toanalyzerelationships in SNS, asSocial Network Analysisresearchersdidtostudy, in face to face relationship, bothformal and informalgroups. <br />in Web 2.0 environmentswe can findexpressionsof the participatory culture, and anamazinglydeep connection betweenaudiences (fans) and media products (tv shows, in our case)<br />
  3. 3. Once upon a time…<br />Research project “TV++”, promotedby Fondazione Bordoni , Dipartimento per le comunicazioni del Ministero per lo sviluppo economico , withCATTID-Sapienza-UniversityofRome<br />The project isaboutnewformsoftelevision and convergencebetweendifferentscreens (tv, internet)<br />OneapplicationweusedisSentimentAnalysisfocused on tv programs and contents<br />We are constructing a specificitalianlexicon<br />Weuse a focusedcrawler on blogs and tweetsabouttelevisioncontents<br />
  4. 4. Issues on the agenda<br />Whatissentimentanalysis?<br />To which contexts of use and objects of analysis has it been applied up to now?<br />Whatkindof output can itgiveus? <br />Howisitdifferentfromotherkindsof audience measurementsystems? <br />
  5. 5. SentimentAnalysis 101<br />Whenanindividualisinterested in a media product, he/shewould<br />express evaluations in its regard: these evaluations could be impromptu and / or rationally or emotionally based (opinion and sentiment).<br />these evaluations will be read, assessed and appropriated by others, who will relate with an object / product they have valued, borrowing attitudes and motivations from the web (personal influence and opinion leaders theories). <br />(Lazarsfeld, Berelson, H.Gaudet)<br />
  6. 6. SentimentAnalysis 101<br />SentimentAnalysisappliesautomated analytical methods to web conversations (within social media) and focuses on:<br />Identifying words or phrases bearing opinions<br />Identifying the general orientation of these opinions (in particular for adjectives, adverbs, verbs)<br />Classifying sentences or documents by the polarity of their opinions.<br />(Tianxia)<br />
  7. 7. SentimentAnalysis 101<br />WithSentimentAnalysis,<br />We are ableto work withlarge-scale data, noteasilyrecoverablewithothermethodologies, <br />We can transformusers’ subjectivity in statisticallyquantifiable and legible data, overtimeand, often, in realtime. <br />We can weigh the popularity of a product or a brand, quantifying its mentions and identifying the positive or negative polarity of consumers’ opinions. <br />
  8. 8. Whatwe can do withSentimentAnalysis<br />We can certify the existence of a certain phenomena (it is not just the result of our speculations on Web 2.0, WOM and on the role of social networks)<br />We can objectify and measure it, in order to quantify the online buzz and make it a manageable and controllable research object<br />We can understand the positive or negative opinion polarity on specific objects of consumption, including media products, and try to use it in forecasting and development.<br />
  9. 9. SentimentAnalysis 101<br />In the end, SentimentAnalysisis:<br />“…translating the vagaries of human emotion into hard data” [primarily in the online world] Mining the web for feelings, not facts (NYT)<br />“…us[ing] automated tools to discern, extract and process attitudinal information found in text…” Sentiment Analysis: Opportunities and Challenges (Grimes, 2008)<br />“…an attempt to automatically process and possibly learn from the universe of people’s online chatter”<br />
  10. 10. Whyblogs?<br />Blogs and microblogs are greatly diffused on the Web<br />They are dynamic and open (i.e. VS message boards) for crawler search<br />They are multi-thematic<br />They are the place in which individuals express their subjectivity through comments, reviews, ratings, experiences, suggestions.<br />
  11. 11. Sentiment analysis = Auditel + Qualitel?<br />
  12. 12. Desperatelyseeking audience<br />The quantitative research tools, in fact, offer to the researchers the illusory certainty of having the pulse of the situation, hiding behind the persuasive power of data the uncertainty deriving from consumption behaviours less and less explicable and quantitatively justifiable.<br />Though monitoring and measuring instruments can lead us to meticulous and accurate representations, their descriptive realism can not be sufficient for the control, because it does not prescribe a behavior. (Ang)<br />
  13. 13. Quickresearch a immersiveresearch?<br />I still think that sentiment analysis could be viewed a bit too hastily as a way to correct the simple systems of statistical audience measurement, based on two central questions : whoiswatching? and what are theywatching?<br />We are adding the like / dislike polarity, but still aren’t thinking about how? or why?<br />
  14. 14. Market research – Empiric sociological research. Hybridizations or rewritings?<br />
  15. 15. Whatquestionsshouldwe pose? / 1<br />How do we differ from the companies that want to know the progress of their brand, which features of their products work, what are the competitive brands and how to orient the market surreptitiously inserting self-produced items within the Buzz?<br />
  16. 16. Whatquestionsshouldwe pose? / 1<br />Dealing with media, we are aware of the difference between financial and cultural economy (Fiske). <br />Sentiment analysis was born in the academy but is nowadays subservient to a financial logic, not to a cultural one. <br />The academy should think about how to adapt Sentiment Analysis to our needs for knowledge <br />
  17. 17. Whatquestionsshouldwe pose? / 2<br />Tracing the life of a commercial product in the WOM is way easierthantracing the neverending life of a media product. <br />The remediationphenomenathat- thanking audiences’ productivity, spreading from a semiotic contribution to grassroot production - surroundsmedia contents, make the media an interesting object of research, but one that is also ephemeral, fickle and elusive.<br />
  18. 18. Whatquestionsshouldwe pose? / 3<br />We are interested in audiences.<br />We are notonlyinterested in understandingwhatthey are watching and iftheylikeit or not, butalsohow and why.<br />Since the whyisexplainedbyFiske’s articulation, I aminvested in understandinghowaudiencesmakesenseof media content and howthey link ittotheir personal experiences.<br />
  19. 19. Whatquestionsshouldwe pose? / 3<br />Sincewe are cultural processes sociologists , we must ask ourselves whether it is enough for us - as it seems to be for the market – to look for opinions, assess trends, follow the success / failure curve of a brand or, rather, if we should understand experiences?<br />
  20. 20. The roleoflexicon<br />Using different lexicons for research, some more oriented on understand the rating, others focused on relating comments to individual experiences –<br />it comes to my mind that we should think about identifying lexicons through qualitative research (i.e. identifying the keywords, the transitional objects of a generation as the experience of the We Search Project? )<br />
  21. 21. The roles of context and social bond<br />
  22. 22. The roleofcontext<br />Thisis a theoretical problem, but also a methodological one: sentiment analysis researchers deal with the difficulties of standardized interpretation of phrases and words can only have a meaning when they are contextualized<br />
  23. 23. The roleofactiveusers<br />Another problem area is the need to filter the presence of really active users, who produce most of the speeches, from the database of posts. <br />Thus, we need to create a sort of cluster related to the involvement level and the production activities of users.<br />
  24. 24. Personal Influence and SentimentAnalysis<br />Sentiment analysis is oriented towards the identification of influential individuals, evoking the concept of Personal Influence and adapting it to Web 2.0. <br />In this way, the focus shifts on the relational dimension of opinion construction and negotiation.<br />Hence the importance of a necessary re-evaluation of the concept of Personal Influence as related to opinion mining.<br />
  25. 25. The relationship impact<br />We need to focus more on the network of subjects and on the relationships between them (Social network analysis) and less on the expression of opinions and views on a product. <br />And we need to analyze the impact that these opinions have on other members of the audience.<br />
  26. 26. Algorithms vs. ethnographic gaze <br />
  27. 27. Whatkindofgaze on Web research<br />The problem with Web research isn’t to have enough answers for a proper analysis, but how to select and process materials from the endless flow of information (Jenkins), using methods based on:<br />a depth of the look that is only manageable in micro communities and not on the entire blogging and microblogging world (terabytes of data, as claimed by engineers)<br />observing Web interactions as if they were natural (researcher in position of a cyberspace lurker, invisible and supposedly able to see everything)<br />
  28. 28. Serial IstinctResearch<br />Two years ago we were conducting the research Serial Instinct. Sulletracce fandom, with the same exploration (there is a phenomena? How big?) and cognitive (what's the meaning of this?) needs, we worked on online message boards focused on TV shows. <br />I think we have fulfilled the task of showing the existence of fandom in Italy, we have interpreted it consistently, we have identified trends in practices, consumer orientation and reception, but we have not adequately explained what ties audiences to a specific media content.<br />On the other hand, we are also aware that the attention for quantitative methods has emerged to contrast the limitations of the ethnographic gaze. <br />
  29. 29. Temporaryconclusion<br />
  30. 30. Whatweexpect<br />Reading in a very positive way the cultural contribution of Web 2.0, we should expect from these processes a significant revolution in terms of audience participation and involvement, since audiences use online expression of views and comments as a trigger for broader social practices related to media consumption. We are dealing with a form of participation and involvement that results in commitment and engagement.<br />
  31. 31. Engagement is “coinvolgimento”<br />We often translate "engagement" with the term coinvolgimento which, in my opinion, refers more to the emotional dimension of being linked to an object, rather than to the dimension of the commitment, and is definitely not exhaustive. <br />
  32. 32. Engagement is …<br />Engagement is in the task of decoding a text , <br />Engagement is spending time consuming a media product, but also is to conceive media use as a series of appointments at a given time<br />Engagement is a commitment with yourself and with media content.<br />Engagement is still what characterizes audiences’ critical analysis of texts, information retrieval and knowledge building, subtitle translation from one language to another and creative production. <br />
  33. 33. Engagement is…<br />And above all, engagement is what drives the audience to perceive a seamless transition from a local experience to a mediated one, to make public their thoughts and feeling, and to be compelled to participate (an idea echoed in the concept of civic engagement).<br />“Engagement” translates the concepts of emotional involvement, empathy, passion, and loyalty, but – because of the potential for interpersonal connection of Web 2.0 - always tends to shift the focus from a dimension of individual perception and interpretation to a social and ultimately , relational one.<br />

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