Ozymandias - in class notes

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Ozymandias - in class notes

  1. 1. OzymandiasPercy Bysshe Shelly
  2. 2. Percy Bysshe Shelly• 1792-1822• Born to an aristocratic family and raised on a country estate• Studied at Oxford University but was expelled when he published, “The Necessity of Atheism”
  3. 3. Percy Bysshe Shelly• The expulsion estranged Shelly from his father and he moved to London• There he met Harriet Westbrook and they eloped• He began exploring his ideas of social justice in his poem “Queen Mab” and he continued to write and develop as a poet• His marriage with Harriet was in trouble
  4. 4. Percy Bysshe Shelly• Shelly then met and fell in love with Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin the daughter of William Godwin and feminist writer/activist Mary Wollstonecraft• Mary was also a writer (she later wrote Frankenstein) and her politics were in line with Shelly’s• Shelly separated from his wife• After Harriet’s death in 1816, Shelly married Mary
  5. 5. Percy Bysshe Shelly• Due to his radical politics and his separation from his wife Shelly became an outcast in England and he moved to Italy• There he wrote many of his finest works: “Ode to the West Wind” and “To a Skylark”• He died in a boating accident at 29
  6. 6. Ozymandias• Sonnet – 14 line, rhyming poem• Ozymandias – Greek for Ramses II – powerful pharaoh referred to in the biblical story of Moses• Octave – 8 lines – describes the tale of the “traveler” who describes two legs of stone without a body, next to the legs is the head or “visage” of the statue sunk in the sand
  7. 7. Ozymandias• The “trunkless legs” the “shattered visage” tell of the destruction of the statue• The sculptor knew his subject’s passions well “wrinkled lip and cold command” – they are still “stamped on these lifeless things”• These survived “the hand that mocked them” – the sculptor and “the heart that fed” - Ramses
  8. 8. Ozymandias• The Sestet – six lines• We hear of the message on the pedestal of the statue – “My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings/ Look on my works, Ye Mighty and despair!”• The pharaoh wanted other kings to fear and admire him• This is ironic since his statue has crumbled a “colossal wreck” and all that is left is endless sand
  9. 9. Ozymandias• Shelly uses alliteration to call attention to this – “stone/Stand”, “cold command”, “survive stamped”, “boundless and bare”, “lone and level”• Shelly give us three points of view – the traveler, Ozymandias and the author (Shelly)• We know Shelly’s POV was about revolution and social justice – his view of the monarchy was negative – he might have been sending a message to cold, power hungry rulers like Ramses
  10. 10. Ozymandias• Shelly uses alliteration to call attention to this – “stone/Stand”, “cold command”, “survive stamped”, “boundless and bare”, “lone and level”• Shelly give us three points of view – the traveler, Ozymandias and the author (Shelly)• We know Shelly’s POV was about revolution and social justice – his view of the monarchy was negative – he might have been sending a message to cold, power hungry rulers like Ramses

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