February 2014

Master At Arms 3rd Class Keiandrea Milbrook (Left) greets Rear Admiral Dixon R. Smith,
Commander, Navy Regi...
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Celebrated
Key Arts Productions members
Veronica Menyweather, Stephen
Wise, and Jo...
NSA Philadelphia Cold Weather Operations
Snow removal operations at Naval
Support Activity Philadelphia
February 3. Photo ...
EMS EXTERNAL AUDIT
To evaluate compliance with applicable
federal, state, and local environmental requirements, as well as...
Civilian and Sailor Of The Quarter 1st Qtr FY14

Stephen L. Sweet (Left), and Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jeffr...
MWR

2014 reservations are available for the MWR Picnic
Pavilion Area. The rental fee is $70 and includes use
of the MWR p...
Active Shooter
Preparedness Empowers You
It saves lives, property, and time.

Emergencies happen, often with
little or no ...
Active Shooter
Make a Plan
• Take violent acts or threats of
violence seriously and report them
immediately to your chain(...
Active Shooter
• Law enforcement’s immediate focus is to stop the active shooter as soon
as possible.

What to Expect When...
Red, White, Blue &
Help Ensure a Secure Energy Future
Energy efficiency ensures a cleaner environment,
mission readiness a...
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February 2014 NSAP Freedom Flyer

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February 2014 edition of the NSAP Freedom Flyer. Newsletter for the Naval Support Activity Philadelphia community.

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February 2014 NSAP Freedom Flyer

  1. 1. February 2014 Master At Arms 3rd Class Keiandrea Milbrook (Left) greets Rear Admiral Dixon R. Smith, Commander, Navy Region Mid Atlantic during a site visit at Naval Support Activity Philadelphia January 28. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume
  2. 2. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Celebrated Key Arts Productions members Veronica Menyweather, Stephen Wise, and Joseph Patterson (at piano) celebrate another stirring multi-media performance of “King’s Dream” that they conducted during the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Observance program onboard the Naval Support Activity (NSA) Philadelphia on January 28. Photo by Edward Maldonado, DLA Troop Support. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Celebrated on Philadelphia Naval Base By Margaret Kenyon-Ely, NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support Office of Corporate Communications Personnel onboard the Naval Support Activity (NSA) Philadelphia honored the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during a program Jan. 28 to commemorate his birthday. “I’m so glad to be with you today to honor a man, with a vision, who changed the world as we know it, for the better. I encourage us all to continue doing our best to live up to that vision in our work...to treat each other with kindness,” said Mr. Rich Ellis, DLA Troop Support Deputy Commander in his opening remarks, emphasizing the annual theme of “Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not a Day Off.” The highlight of the event was marked by Key Arts Productions who presented the captivating “King’s Dream,” a multi-media production featuring poignant film clips as well as live music and vocal performances. “I’m happy to have the opportunity to join you in the celebration of the work of Dr. King ... who gave his life for social justice,” commented Key Arts Production’s Joseph Patterson as he kicked off the powerful tribute. 1 In addition to engaging attendees with archival film footage that featured some of King’s speeches, marches, and protests, Patterson encouraged audience participation during several songs where those present clapped and sang along to pieces such as Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” and the Civil Rights Movement anthem “We Shall Overcome.” Co-sponsored by the NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support (NAVSUP WSS) Philadelphia Command Equal Employment Opportunity Advisory Committee (EEOAC) and DLA Troop Support EEO Office, the event also featured Command presentations to Key Arts Productions by Ellis on behalf of DLA Troop Support Commander Brig. Gen. Steven A. Shapiro, USA, and Capt. Rick Smitha, NAVSUP WSS Director, Engineering and Product Support, on behalf of NAVSUP WSS Commander Rear Adm. John G. King, SC, USN. Also, Mary Bryant, DLA Troop Support EEOAC member, served as the program emcee.
  3. 3. NSA Philadelphia Cold Weather Operations Snow removal operations at Naval Support Activity Philadelphia February 3. Photo courtesy of Public Works Department Pennsylvania, NAVFAC Mid-Atlantic. NSA Philadelphia Cold Weather Operations Story by Lt. Michael Kistler, Assistant Public Works Officer, Public Works Department Pennsylvania, NAVFAC Mid-Atlantic The weather outside is frightful-but there is a contingent of men that are on base no matter what-braving frigid temperatures, bone numbing wind chills, and drifts of snow. Depending on the timing of the storm, these men are often facing these elements in the wee hours of the morning. During the week of 20 January, 13 inches of snow were dumped on to NSA Philadelphia. For 36 intermittent hours, the men plowed and shoveled snow to clear the roads and sidewalks. Snow often drifted just minutes after it was freshly moved. The tireless work of these men allowed the base to open relatively quickly. For smaller snow and ice events, the men typically come in at 3 AM (or earlier) for a few hours of snow operations, then work their normal jobs for the duration of the day. It is extremely grueling, but it is taken in stride as something that must be done. These men of Public Works are the unsung heroes of the base. They work long hours and must respond at a moment’s notice. Their work is in austere and harsh conditions. With the football season in recent memory, these men are like the Offensive Lineman of the base-their work is vital, and you don’t realize how necessary they are until a snow event or facilities emergency happens. Their job is often thankless, but the base would not function without the hard work and dedication they exhibit every day. The following are the hard working “Cold Weather Crew” of Public Works: 1) Karl Von Bueren 2) Joe Chybinski 3) John Lombardo 4) Rick Smith 5) Joe Cunningham 6) Joe McVey 7) Joe D’Antonio 8) Ed Wooten 9) John Ciurlino 10) Keith Esbensen 11) Charles Tarlecki 12) Joe Fedenecz 13) Michael Dickey 14) Matt McGoveren 15) Frank Facciolo 16) John Humphreys 17) Joe Serratore 18) Sean McVey 19) John Shields 20) Anthony Lapacinski Supervisors: Cliff Nevin and Bob Kinsella Shop worker vacuuming water from a burst pipe at Naval Support Activity Philadelphia. Photo courtesy of Public Works Department Pennsylvania, NAVFAC Mid-Atlantic. 2
  4. 4. EMS EXTERNAL AUDIT To evaluate compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental requirements, as well as DoD, Navy, regional, and installation policies (per Executive Order (EO) 13423 of 24 Jan 2007, EO 13514 of 08 October 2009 and OPNAVINST 5090.1C, CH-3 of 31 Aug 2007), NAVFAC has been directed to conduct External Environmental Compliance Assessments at CNIC installations. Be prepared—audit teams will be on-site during the first week of March!
  5. 5. Civilian and Sailor Of The Quarter 1st Qtr FY14 Stephen L. Sweet (Left), and Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Jeffrey Cmar are recognized as the First Quarter 2014 Naval Support Activity Philadelphia Civilian and Sailor of the Quarter January 16. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume NSA Philadelphia Security Officer John Piersa, Naval Support Activity Security (Right) greets Rear Admiral Dixon R. Smith, Commander, Navy Region Mid Atlantic during a site visit at NSA Philadelphia January 28.. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume 4
  6. 6. MWR 2014 reservations are available for the MWR Picnic Pavilion Area. The rental fee is $70 and includes use of the MWR pavilion, sand volleyball court, horseshoe pits, the basketball court, and assorted lawn games. Access to a refrigerator and indoor restrooms is also included. (Payment of the rental fee is required to reserve your date.) Looking for something fun to do after work? Fran's Hangar Bay (MWR All Hands Club) is open Wednesday and Thursday nights at 4:00. The Club is also available to rent for your next special occasion. For more information, please contact the ITT office at 215697-5392 or NSAPHILITT@navy.mil or the Club office at 215-697-4101 or e-mail NSAPHILMWR@navy.mil. Classifieds Carpool: 20 years experience, Warminster area, and towns along routes in. Wed and Thurs. 630 to 5 p.m. Currently down to 2 people saving gas and wear and tear. For more info please contact Mike Gross (215) 737-5354 -------------------------------------------------------------------------The Freedom Flyer will publish free listings of personal items for sale by personnel of the Naval and Defense Activities at Philadelphia. Such items and services must represent an incidental exchange between personnel on the installation and not be business operations. Ads are limited to 15 words, include Command/Code, one per employee, and photos are highly encouraged. Work extensions may only be used on car and van pool ads. All others must use a home or cell phone number. Ads are printed on a space available basis. Send submissions to MC1(SCW) Ace Rheaume at ace.rheaume@navy.mil. Find us on Facebook! “Naval Support Activity Philadelphia” Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffery T. Rathbun Officer-in-Charge Cmdr. Robert Speight Deputy Site Manager NSAP Dennis Donahue Site Manager PNY HTCS(SW) Charles Brautcheck Editorial Director MC1(SCW) Ace Rheaume The Freedom Flyer is an authorized publication for members of the military service and civilian personnel of the Navy and Department of Defense commands and activities located at the Naval Support Activity (NSA) Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, nor the U.S. Navy, and do not imply endorsement thereof. The editorial content of this publication is reviewed, prepared, and distributed by the NSA Philadelphia Public Affairs Office. For more information please contact MC1(SCW) Ace Rheaume, NSA Philadelphia Public Affairs Officer, at 215-697-5995 or ace.rheaume@navy.mil. 5
  7. 7. Active Shooter Preparedness Empowers You It saves lives, property, and time. Emergencies happen, often with little or no notice. By taking action beforehand you can be prepared for any emergency. Be Ready Navy! I am. Are you? Understand What to Do In an active shooter situation, be prepared to: 1. Run & escape: If possible and there is an accessible path, attempt to escape from the premises. 2. Hide: If escape is not possible, find a place to hide where the active shooter is less likely to find you. 3. Fight: Only as a last resort, and only when your life is in imminent danger, attempt to disrupt and/or incapacitate the active shooter. 4. Call 911 when safe to do so, and relay as many details as possible. An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area. In most cases, active shooters use firearms and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims. Often, they have no regard for their own safety or capture. Active shooters pose an immediate risk of death or serious injury to anyone in the vicinity. They are often on the move and will accept random victims of opportunity while searching for intended victims or until stopped by law enforcement, suicide, or other intervention. Common motives include anger, revenge, ideology, and untreated mental illness. Active shooter situations are unpredictable and evolve quickly. Responding Navy Security Force Law Enforcement personnel will act swiftly with a primary duty to protect innocent life by focusing their efforts on finding and neutralizing the active shooter(s). However, because most incidents last only 10 to 15 minutes, individuals at the scene must be prepared to deal with the situation until law enforcement personnel arrive. How to Prepare Be Informed • Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers. • Sign up to receive local emergency alerts and register your work and personal contact information in the Wide Area Alert Network. By taking these steps, you will ensure that you and designated family members receive notices to be able to stay clear of an active shooter incident. • Ask your employer to explain the emergency action plan for your building. • Understand the plans for individuals with special needs and/or disabilities. Recognize signs of potential violence in those around you: • Increased use of alcohol and/or drugs • Unexplained increase in absences or tardiness • Depression, withdrawal, paranoia, talk of revenge • Increased severe mood swings and noticeably unstable, emotional responses • Increased talk of problems at home • Increased unsolicited comments about violence, firearms, or other dangerous weapons or violent crimes
  8. 8. Active Shooter Make a Plan • Take violent acts or threats of violence seriously and report them immediately to your chain(s) of command, DOD law enforcement, Navy Security Force Protection authorities, counterintelligence authorities, medical/mental health care professionals, or local law enforcement personnel, as appropriate. (The chances for prevention improve with increased awareness of potential warning signs and rapid response to a problem. Friends, family, co-workers, neighbors, and supervisors are typically the most likely to recognize potential threat indicators.) • Make note of your environment and any possible dangers. • Look for the two nearest exits in any place you visit, and have an escape path and plan in mind. • Make a plan with your family, and ensure everyone knows what they would do, if confronted with an active shooter. • Remain calm, and do not pull or respond to the fire alarm unless instructed to do so by official, law enforcement personnel. What to Do • Be quiet and silence your phone and any source of noise. • Turn off all lights. • Look for an accessible escape path. • Do NOT seek out the shooter. • Run and escape, if possible. » If safe to do so, use an accessible escape path. » Help others escape, if possible, but evacuate regardless of whether others agree to follow. » Leave your belongings behind. » Warn and prevent individuals from entering an area where the active shooter may be. » Keep your hands visible. • Hide, if escape is not possible. » If you are in an office, stay there and lock and barricade the door. » If you are in a hallway, get into a room and secure the door. » Close, cover, and move away from windows. » Your hiding place should be out of the shooter’s view and provide protection if shots are fired in your direction. » Remain quiet with all sources of noise silenced. • Fight as an absolute last resort, and only when your life is in imminent danger. Do NOT seek out the shooter. • Attempt to disrupt and/or incapacitate the active shooter. » Act aggressively and be prepared to cause severe or lethal injury to the shooter. » Throw items and improvise weapons. » Yell. » Commit to your actions. • Call 911 when it is safe to do so and provide the following information to law enforcement officers or 911 operators: » Location of the active shooter. » Number of shooters, if more than one. » Physical description of the shooter(s). » Number and type of weapons held by the shooter(s). » Number of potential victims at the location. Be Ready Navy—Be informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emergency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days. www.ready.navy.mil
  9. 9. Active Shooter • Law enforcement’s immediate focus is to stop the active shooter as soon as possible. What to Expect When Law Enforcement Arrives • Officers will proceed directly to the area in which the last shots were heard. • The first officers to arrive at the scene will not stop to help injured persons because their first priority is life safety. They will need to secure the scene first. • Rescue teams composed of other officers and emergency medical personnel will follow the first officers into secured areas to treat and remove the injured. • Officers arriving on scene may be coming from many different duty assignments and agencies, and additional officers may arrive in teams. • Officers will likely be in various types of uniforms, external bullet proof vests, Kevlar helmets and other tactical equipment, and even in street clothes. Do not be surprised by the variances in appearance; they are trained to work together. • Officers may be armed with rifles, shotguns, and/or handguns and may use pepper spray or tear gas to control the situation. • Officers will shout commands and may push individuals to the ground for their safety. • Expect that officers will treat the entire area as a crime scene and everyone with suspicion. • Law enforcement will establish secure assembly points and will question all witnesses. • Usually, officers will not allow anyone to leave designated assembly points until the situation is under control and all witnesses have been identified and debriefed. Expect to remain in the secure area until authorities release you. • Remain calm and follow instructions. What to Do When Law Enforcement Arrives What to Do After Reaching a Safe Location or Assembly Point • Identify yourself as a witness and relay any medical needs you may have. • Answer any questions law enforcement authorities may have. • Do not leave until law enforcement authorities have instructed you to do so. • Seek medical care and counseling if needed. Department of Homeland Security— • http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/ assets/active_shooter_booklet.pdf Where to Find More Information • http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/ assets/active_shooter_pocket_card.pdf • http://www.dhs.gov/video/ options-consideration-active-shootertraining-video FEMA— • http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/ IS/is907.asp • Do not attempt to assist unless specifically asked to do so by law enforcement personnel. • Slowly put down any items in your hands (e.g., bags, jackets). • Raise hands and spread fingers. • Keep hands visible at all times. • Avoid quick movements toward officers, such as holding on to them for safety. • Avoid pointing, screaming, or yelling. • Do not stop to ask officers for help or direction when evacuating, as they will be focused on finding and incapacitating the shooter to prevent further loss of life. Not adhering to officers’ instructions puts everyone in danger. Be Ready Navy—Be informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emergency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days. www.ready.navy.mil
  10. 10. Red, White, Blue & Help Ensure a Secure Energy Future Energy efficiency ensures a cleaner environment, mission readiness and less dependence on foreign oil Energy Efficiency - Makes Sense for National Defense Visit https://energy.navy.mil

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