Gangsters and Bootleggers in the 1920s

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Overview of social/cultural climate in the 1920s.

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Gangsters and Bootleggers in the 1920s

  1. 1. Gangsters and Bootleggers<br />By Will B<br />Bobbie T<br />Barbara L<br />
  2. 2. Bootlegging and Rum-Running<br />Bootlegging- smuggling of alcohol on land<br />Rum-running- smuggling of alcohol over seas<br />Gangsters made huge profit from bootlegging alcohol because there was a large desire for it and the government could not tax or regulate it<br />
  3. 3. Famous Gangsters<br />
  4. 4. Al Capone<br />Leader of a gang called the<br />“Capones” in Chicago<br />Famous for bootlegging and<br />racketeering<br />Participated in Chicago’s<br />“St. Valentine’s Day Massacre”<br />
  5. 5. Bill McCoy<br />Considered himself an “honest lawbreaker”<br />Rum-runner during prohibition<br />Smuggled from the Bahamas to<br /> “rum row” in Long Island<br />Actions created the phrase “the real McCoy”<br />
  6. 6. Enoch “Nucky” Johnson<br />Main character of “Boardwalk Empire”<br />Atlantic City political boss and racketeer<br />Facilitated the illegal alcohol trade in Atlantic City<br />Helped to build up Atlantic City as “The World’s Playground” <br />
  7. 7. Importance of Gangsters<br />1920s were a time of large corporate monopolies, so the “little guy” had no voice<br />Gangsters were “urban Robin Hoods”<br />Helped out the “little guy” and were thus generally well liked by their communities<br />Some (i.e. Nucky Johnson) became politicians because of their appeal to the masses<br />The mass appeal and support of politicians facilitated gangsters’ illegal activities<br />

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