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religions of the world:<br />S H  I  N  T  O<br />by jennifer le, hillary nguyen, yen tran, and nhu vu<br />
table of contents<br />I. Religious Data<br />II. Religious Diffusion<br />III. Religious Beliefs<br />IV. Cultural Intera...
10 million Japanese participate in rituals but a third call themselves Shintoists.<br />Shinto ranks tenth after Jainism, ...
Shinto was formed around 550 B. C. in Japan.<br />Shinto is practiced exclusively in Japan or with people of Japanese heri...
There is no all-powerful God in Shino.<br />b.   The worship of Kami<br />i. Kamiare gods and spirits that govern over nat...
Renewal and purification<br />i.  “Man is kami’s child;” Life was given to people by  kami and has sacred nature.<br />   ...
The Shinto religion goes hand in hand with traditional values and the daily customs of Japan. <br />d. Other customs inclu...
Shinto teaches people to be gentle to nature.<br />b. Everything given to humans from nature must be returned to its origi...
All of the natural landscape, including valleys, streams, mountains, and waterfalls, is sacred space.<br />b. All shrines ...
koma-inu<br />torri gate<br />kamidana<br />goshintai<br />
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Religions of the World : Shinto

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Religions of the World : Shinto

  1. 1. religions of the world:<br />S H I N T O<br />by jennifer le, hillary nguyen, yen tran, and nhu vu<br />
  2. 2. table of contents<br />I. Religious Data<br />II. Religious Diffusion<br />III. Religious Beliefs<br />IV. Cultural Interaction in Religion<br />V. Religious Ecology<br />VI. Religious Landscape<br />
  3. 3. 10 million Japanese participate in rituals but a third call themselves Shintoists.<br />Shinto ranks tenth after Jainism, Baha’ism, Judaism, and Sikhism, in ninth-sixth, respectively.<br />Shinto is growing, due to a large number of sects blending Buddhism with it.<br />Adherents feel a strong bond or connection with nature or have a defining moment where Shinto feels just right for them.<br />i. religious data<br />
  4. 4. Shinto was formed around 550 B. C. in Japan.<br />Shinto is practiced exclusively in Japan or with people of Japanese heritage. <br />Due to its Japanese based heritage, the religion has not spread dramatically to other nations.<br />Today, Shinto continues to mainly reside with the boundaries of Japan or Japanese immigrants.<br />ii. religious diffusion<br />
  5. 5. There is no all-powerful God in Shino.<br />b. The worship of Kami<br />i. Kamiare gods and spirits that govern over nature and human life.<br /> ii. They are believe to animate the world through geographical sites (Mount Fuji) and natural phenomenon (kamikaze).<br />The individual is less than the group.<br />Wa (“benign harmony”) is ingrained in nature and human relationships. <br />i. Anything that disturbs this condition is bad. To keep the balance of harmony, there are rules to keep society and the natural world from turning into chaos.<br />ii. Wais reflected in everyday actions. For example, the removal of one’s shoes before entering a home and taking daily baths. <br />iii. religious beliefs<br />
  6. 6. Renewal and purification<br />i. “Man is kami’s child;” Life was given to people by kami and has sacred nature.<br /> ii. But because divine nature is rarely seen purification is necessary.<br /> iii. A shrine dedicated to kami has a trough of pure water used for the rituals of rinsing the hands and mouth, required before approaching the image of kami.This process is called oharai.<br /> iv. Shinto has little care for death and the afterlife. Shinto is mainly a “life religion” concerned with the here and now and not the afterlife.<br /> v. They believe that the soul, or tama, of the dead continues to have influence on the living before finally becoming a part of the kami ancestors from the family it belongs to. <br /> vi. If a person were to pass away, Shintoists would use the Buddhist idea of afterlife.<br />
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  8. 8. The Shinto religion goes hand in hand with traditional values and the daily customs of Japan. <br />d. Other customs include the use of proper greetings or the removal of one’s shoes before entering a home.<br />b. Japanese society greatly stresses the importance of respect and character.<br />e. Ikebana (flower arranging), traditional Japanese architecture, andgarden design have Shinto roots.<br />c. Kotodama, or “words with a magical effect on the world,” is used in Japan. For example, itadakimasu is said before eating.<br />iv. cultural interaction in religion<br />f. In sumo wrest-ling, salt is used to purify the wrestling arena.<br />
  9. 9. Shinto teaches people to be gentle to nature.<br />b. Everything given to humans from nature must be returned to its original place.<br />c. Pollution or defilement<br />is an act of evil or a sin, <br />caused by lack of aware-<br />ness, awe, and reverence.<br />d. Nature is perceived as <br />holy, divine, and superior.<br />Humans must yield to it.<br />v. religious ecology<br />
  10. 10. All of the natural landscape, including valleys, streams, mountains, and waterfalls, is sacred space.<br />b. All shrines are sacred places of worship.<br />i. A pair of stone lion-dog statues called koma-inu guard shrine entrances to keep spirits away.<br />The toriigate is the symbol of the Shinto religion. They can be placed at the entrance of the shrine of directly in front of buildings within.<br />The dead are usually cremated and buried in family graves. <br />Most shrines keep a special goshintai, or symbol, that represents a kamior a legend.<br />Kamidana-fujiis white paper that covers the entrance to household shrines to keep impure spirits away.<br />vi. religious landscape<br />
  11. 11. koma-inu<br />torri gate<br />kamidana<br />goshintai<br />

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