COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY By: Hillary, Rica, Rebecca, Jen, Stephanie and Marian
Start off question… What do you think is the difference between Fine-Art Photography and Commercial Photography?
Product/ Food Photography
 
 
 
<ul><li>Solid Colour Backgrounds </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly black or white depending on the object being photographed. Whi...
The Lighting Set-Up
 
<ul><li>Set-Up </li></ul><ul><li>End result </li></ul>
Processing <ul><li>There are many different techniques to fix errors or small mistakes using different tools in photoshop....
Video http://www. youtube .com/watch? v=-zARqGgHjNc
Food Photography
 
 
Commercial vs. Still Life Fine Art
 
 
Fine-Art to Advertising
<ul><li>“ Adee, Daniel Ezralow”,  Breaking Bounds , 1982-1992 </li></ul>
<ul><li>“ Daniel Ezralow & Ashley Roland”,  Breaking Bounds , 1982-1992 </li></ul>
<ul><li>“ Daniel Ezralow & Ashley Roland”,  Breaking Bounds,  1982-1992 </li></ul>
<ul><li>“ David Parsons”,  Breaking Bounds,  1982-1992 </li></ul>
“ COMMERCIAL CLIENTS…” <ul><li>love to fit the images right into their layout and walk out of the studio with virtually se...
 
 
 
 
 
 
Editorial Advertising
 
 
 
 
 
 
Editorial Photography JEN’S PART- REMOVE BEFORE PRESENTATION AFTER SLIDES ARE PLACED IN ORDER
Fashion Photography STEPHANIE’S PART- REMOVE BEFORE PRESENTATION AFTER SLIDES ARE PLACED IN ORDER
Commercial Documentary
<ul><li>Established 1888 </li></ul><ul><li>Known for their expansive photography collection </li></ul><ul><li>World cultur...
<ul><li>“ The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888. It is one of the ...
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/community/email/
Example: Photo Contest 2011
http:// www.nationalgeographicassignment.com / Note:National Geographic also offers grants and programs!
 
Selling Resources <ul><li>National Geographic Stock Images </li></ul><ul><li>royalty-free images </li></ul><ul><li>fees de...
Quote <ul><li>“ Most of my pictures are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking ou...
 
 
 
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  • Product photography ranges with various subject matters: it is commonly split into three categories: product (furniture, lighting, decoration), Jewellery (rings, necklaces etc), and food photography.
  • You can create your own studio lighting kit for under $100 at your regular hardware store. All you need are a minimum 500w incandescent light – and obviously material to soften the quality
  • Number 1 and 2 is a foam and plastic reflector screen. Instead of putting the light on both sides of the set I&apos;ve used these screens and light number 5 (10º honeycomb grid on the Einstein 640) to get areas in front and behind the set highlighted. Notice that foam screen (number 1 ) is also blocking direct light from the hi-intense spot light source (number 5 ), protecting the brush set from unwanted harsh reflection. Aimed slightly above, spot light hits curved reflector (number 2 ), spreading the reflected soft light back to the subject. There is a diffuser panel on the right ( Westcott Illuminator Reflector Kit 6-in-1 – 52? ), highlighted from behind by WL X1600 (number 6 ) through 20º honeycomb grid. It was very easy to modulate the shape of the reflection it produced on the brushes by moving the number 6 from the diffuser panel: gradient gets sharper when we have light closer to a diffuser, and the opposite, softer gradient when spot is moved away from the panel. Notice that our spot hits diffuser at the sharp angle, creating strip-box like shape of the highlighted area. Strip box on the left (number 4 , on the Einstein 640) was there to produce that hard line on the left side of the brushes. This line is what helps to produce that glossy look I was trying to achieve. Exposure specification: shutter speed 1/250 sec, F18, ISO 100
  • But how do you photograph food and get such great results? 1. Lighting Treat the food you’re photographing as you would any other still life subject and ensure that it is well lit. Many of the poor examples of food photography that I’ve come across in the research for this article could have been drastically improved with adequate lighting. One of the best places to photograph food is by a window where there is plenty of natural light – perhaps supported with flash bounced off a ceiling or wall to give more balanced lighting that cuts out the shadows. This daylight helps to keep the food looking much more natural.
  • 2. Props Pay attention not only to the arrangement of the food itself but to the context that you put it in including the plate or bowl and any table settings around it. Don’t clutter the photo with a full table setting but consider one or two extra elements such as a glass, fork, flower or napkin. These elements can often be placed in secondary positions in the foreground or background of your shot. 3. Be Quick Food doesn’t keep it’s appetizing looks for long so as a photographer you’ll need to be well prepared and able to shoot quickly after it’s been cooked before it melts, collapses, wilts and/or changes color. This means being prepared and knowing what you want to achieve before the food arrives. One strategy that some use is to have the shot completely set up with props before the food is ready and then to substitute a stand-in plate to get your exposure right. Then when the food is ready you just switch the stand-in plate with the real thing and you’re ready to start shooting.
  • 7. Macro Really focusing in upon just one part of the dish can be an effective way of highlighting the different elements of it. 8. Steam Having steam rising off your food can give it a ‘just cooked’ feel which some food photographers like. Of course this can be difficult to achieve naturally. I spoke with one food stylist a few years back who told me that they added steam with a number of artificial strategies including microwaving water soaked cotton balls and placing them behind food. This is probably a little advance for most of us – however it was an interesting trick so I thought I’d include it.
  • Still life photography is the depiction of inanimate subject matter, commonly of a small grouping of objects. Still life photography gives the photographer leeway in terms of design and elements of composition. Still life relays heavily on a strong skill with lighting and compositional skills. The still life photographer makes pictures rather than takes them. Knowing where to look for propping and surfaces also is a required skill.
  • Open discussion about commercial product vs. still life. Introduce irving penn and how he used still life for ads yet also for his own fine art practice. Example of fine art photographers: Irving Penn Edward Weston
  • Which is Editorial and which is Fashion? Why? Both advertise clothing but one is obviously more exuberant and colourfull but does that make or break a photo or is an editorial ad more straight forward?
  • What are your ideas on editorial and how does it apply to these ads?
  • Editorial photography is work which is commissioned for articles in newspapers, magazines and websites, chapters in books and text in company brochures.
  • what is the difference between editorial fashion and advertising/commercial fashion . Quite simply, as most of you know, editorial is what would be shown in a magazine. Advertising is selling a product or brand or product. Advertising tends to look cleaner, using simple lighting to really show off the clothing or make up. Editorial sells more of the mood and the situation the clothing would be worn in. There are less rules per se in editorial fashion photography because it’s a bit looser.
  • Paul Kline is a working artist the blurs the line between typical editorial and advertising. I found a lot of his work is kept very general, weater it be to appeal to a larger audience or just to showcase his skills.
  • Example of his work being used
  • Final powerpoint outline

    1. 1. COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY By: Hillary, Rica, Rebecca, Jen, Stephanie and Marian
    2. 2. Start off question… What do you think is the difference between Fine-Art Photography and Commercial Photography?
    3. 3. Product/ Food Photography
    4. 7. <ul><li>Solid Colour Backgrounds </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly black or white depending on the object being photographed. White plexiglass or glass is used to prevent from shadows showing on film. </li></ul><ul><li>Pattern/Textured Backgrounds </li></ul><ul><li>Used to show distinction of the object from the background. Used to place the object in a setting (but never distracting from the main focal point) </li></ul>
    5. 8. The Lighting Set-Up
    6. 10. <ul><li>Set-Up </li></ul><ul><li>End result </li></ul>
    7. 11. Processing <ul><li>There are many different techniques to fix errors or small mistakes using different tools in photoshop. Smart Sharpen is a basic tool that when used with lens blur option helps fix small details. </li></ul>
    8. 12. Video http://www. youtube .com/watch? v=-zARqGgHjNc
    9. 13. Food Photography
    10. 16. Commercial vs. Still Life Fine Art
    11. 19. Fine-Art to Advertising
    12. 20. <ul><li>“ Adee, Daniel Ezralow”, Breaking Bounds , 1982-1992 </li></ul>
    13. 21. <ul><li>“ Daniel Ezralow & Ashley Roland”, Breaking Bounds , 1982-1992 </li></ul>
    14. 22. <ul><li>“ Daniel Ezralow & Ashley Roland”, Breaking Bounds, 1982-1992 </li></ul>
    15. 23. <ul><li>“ David Parsons”, Breaking Bounds, 1982-1992 </li></ul>
    16. 24. “ COMMERCIAL CLIENTS…” <ul><li>love to fit the images right into their layout and walk out of the studio with virtually set ads…” </li></ul>-Lois Greenfield
    17. 31. Editorial Advertising
    18. 38. Editorial Photography JEN’S PART- REMOVE BEFORE PRESENTATION AFTER SLIDES ARE PLACED IN ORDER
    19. 39. Fashion Photography STEPHANIE’S PART- REMOVE BEFORE PRESENTATION AFTER SLIDES ARE PLACED IN ORDER
    20. 40. Commercial Documentary
    21. 41. <ul><li>Established 1888 </li></ul><ul><li>Known for their expansive photography collection </li></ul><ul><li>World cultures, nature and geography, with a focus on documentary and conservation </li></ul><ul><li>Place for amateur photographers to gain exposure, experience, and recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Photographers are fully credited for their work </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasizes the importance of not only having an online portfolio, but also a blog, where people interested in your work can find you </li></ul><ul><li>My Shot - great resource for those looking to get their foot in the door of the industry </li></ul><ul><li>Link: http:// photography.nationalgeographic.com /photography/ </li></ul>
    22. 42. <ul><li>“ The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888. It is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation. “ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.nationalgeographic.com/about/ </li></ul>
    23. 43. http://www.nationalgeographic.com/community/email/
    24. 44. Example: Photo Contest 2011
    25. 45. http:// www.nationalgeographicassignment.com / Note:National Geographic also offers grants and programs!
    26. 47. Selling Resources <ul><li>National Geographic Stock Images </li></ul><ul><li>royalty-free images </li></ul><ul><li>fees dependent upon size of image and intended use </li></ul><ul><li>Shutter Stock </li></ul><ul><li>royalty-free images </li></ul><ul><li>monthly or by-the-photo fees </li></ul><ul><li>http://blogs.photopreneur.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photo-tips/?source = NavPhoTip </li></ul>
    27. 48. Quote <ul><li>“ Most of my pictures are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey when it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that I guess you’d call the human experience.” </li></ul><ul><li>(from Steve McCurry’s website ) </li></ul>

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