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JUNE 201416
#Legal
D
ue diligence oversight, from in-
ception, is crucial once an orga-
nization decides to investigate a
...
JUNE 201426
#Roundtable
Mobility
MaturesAt our most recent IT executive
discussion, CIOs confront a new
set of challenges ...
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When workforce threats get set in motion - - Mobile and cloud technologies are raising huge issues around device and program policy. An expert’s perspective

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When workforce threats get set in motion - - Mobile and cloud technologies are raising huge issues around device and program policy. An expert’s perspective

  1. 1. JUNE 201416 #Legal D ue diligence oversight, from in- ception, is crucial once an orga- nization decides to investigate a mobility program that enables workers to access both corpo- rate and personal data. The evolving trend, over the last few years, of providing corporate, handheld devices to desig- nated employees to enable them to better perform their jobs were issued with fairly strict technologi- cal restrictions and in an atmosphere of trust. As feature-enriched smartphones, tablets and amaz- ingly thin & highly compact notebooks started evolving, these same workers and workplace col- leagues started sporting such devices for personal use – hence, it is quite common to see folks carry- ing a corporate-issued Blackberry together with an Android, Windows, or iPhone device. As organizational technology advances, accom- panied by aging device replenishment needs work- force divestment and remote or home office ac- cess, more organizations began investigating and implementing a single device strategy, wherein restricted and controlled access would be provided to corporate servers while also partitioning the device for the employee’s personal use. There is a variety of approaches ranging from BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) under which an employee may use their own, or corporate issued or funded, device to access both organizational data that is ideally segregated from personal data to COPE (Corporate Owned, Personally Enabled), strategies under which the Corporation issues an authorized device for corporate utilization and also so enabled for the employee’s personal use. The various criteria that distinguish “a wider array of technology options beyond BYOD, such as HYOD (Here’s Your Own Device) or CYOD (Choose Your Own Device) BYOD programs in terms of ownership, contracting and paying for When workforce threats get set in motion Mobile and cloud technologies are raising huge issues around device and program policy. An expert’s perspective By Lou Milrad Lou Milrad is a Toronto-based business & IT lawyer who practices IT Law and provides public & private sector clients with legal services relating to technology licensing, procurement, commercialization, cloud computing, open data and public-private alliances.
  2. 2. JUNE 201426 #Roundtable Mobility MaturesAt our most recent IT executive discussion, CIOs confront a new set of challenges in mobility. By Jim Love O ver the past few years, when we held previous roundtable discussions to discuss mobility challenges, many participants were grappling with the early stages of BYOD. The need to develop policies, the lack of good Mobile Device Management (MDM) solutions and the struggle to cope with the onslaught of IOS based phones and tablets - those were the three major challenges. This year, the discussion was very dif- ferent. A world gone mobile Whether it's Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) or Corporately Owned Person- ally Enabled (COPE) the real issue is user choice. There is little hope of stem- ming the wide range of devices - in all but a few companies, choice of device is the norm. Perhaps bruised from the futile battle to restrict IOS devices, if our group is any indication, Canadian companies may be actively embracing Android devices, despite some reserva- tions about security. Android accep- tance - even Android preference was far stronger than even we had anticipated. Once referred to as “consumeriza- tion,” the idea of BYOD was often seen as an incursion of people’s consumer urges dictating the type of phone. To- day the discussion is much more from a “producer” mentality. The idea is that employees are driven towards a particular device because it allows them to get their work done bet- ter. It’s a subtle but powerful shift and it was thor- oughly in evidence with the group who attended our round table. It’s not about devices. It’s about mobility. Mobil- ity has become a standard requirement in many corporations. When one of the participants com- mented that he had more wireless users than wired users, nobody batted an eye. Mobility is now a given. And it’s not just email on a phone - that didn’t even make it into our discussion. Mobility as a Competitive Strategy Today, if our group is any indication, mobility moved to a new paradigm beyond productivity to a new question. “How do we use mobility as part of a competitive strategy?” Most of our partici- pants agreed that if we want to recruit the best and brightest these days, mobility was a key issues. “The best talent will demand that they are con- nected,” was the phrase used by one participant. Jim Love is IT World Canada’s CIO

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