Teacher: McLaren                Date: September 19, 2011   Subject: 6th Social Studies         Unit/Topic: The Earliest   ...
1) Warm Up – Do Now:1. Place given events on a timeline in chronological order: 2 million BC – Paleolithic/Old Stone Age b...
5) Independent (or pair / small group) Practice (“You”):   • S will work independently to answer the following questions: ...
Teacher: McLaren                Date: September 20, 2011   Subject: 6th Social Studies         Unit/Topic: The Earliest   ...
of your day do you spend trying to find food? T will get S to see that we spend little to no time       searching for food...
they were going to stay in the                                                                           same shelter, the...
Teacher: McLaren                Date: September 20, 2011   Subject: 6th Social Studies         Unit/Topic: The Earliest   ...
What did it mean to be human during prehistory?             and animals and new sources of clothing (H-1C-M2)             ...
3) Lesson Development (“I” or “I/We”):                                    Key Vocabulary:   •   Double t-chart, advantages...
6) Closure (re-state the OBJECTIVE):    T will ask a couple scholars to share their RAFT with the class. S will share-out...
Day 2: lower-scholars…revise and edit before publishing…higher scholars, push to citesourcesHow to teach cause and effect—...
Reinforce paleo/neo differences by contrasting lifestyle features (food supply, shelter,communities/pop, jobs, trade)   1....
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Earliest communities

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Earliest communities

  1. 1. Teacher: McLaren Date: September 19, 2011 Subject: 6th Social Studies Unit/Topic: The Earliest CommunitiesBig Goal (BAG)/Essential Questions (EQ): GLE(s): 2. Identify land and climatic conditions conducive to human th settlement in regions of the world and describe the role of these • 100% of 6 grade scholars will be college- conditions (G-1B-M1) bound and on the Pathway to Success by 18. Describe the causes, effects, or impact of a given historical working toward mastery of all 6th grade Social development or event in world civilizations (H-1A-M3) Studies skills. 24. Explain how geographical features influenced development of early civilizations (e.g., domestication, cultivation, specialization) • 89% of 6th grade scholars will score Basic or (H-1C-M2) above on the iLEAP. 25. Explain why agricultural societies developed from hunters and gatherers (H-1C-M2)What did it mean to be human during prehistory? 26. Discuss the climatic changes and human modifications of the physical environment that gave rise to the domestication of plants and animals and new sources of clothing (H-1C-M2) 1. How did the physical and natural environment affect the way that humans lived during prehistory? 2. How did relationships affect the way humans lived during prehistory? 3. How did ideas about the world, nature and the cosmos affect the way humans lived during prehistory?Objectives: SWBAT… Materials Needed:1. Identify the time period of the Neolithic/New Stone Do Now/Exit TicketAge. Chain Reading Cards2. Describe how the world’s physical/natural Classwork/Homeworkenvironment changed when the last Ice Age came toan end and how this contributed to the Neolithic/NewStone Age.3. Explain how humans created a stable food supplyduring the Neolithic/New Stone Age.Key Questions:What was the big change that occurred 10,000years ago, and what caused it?How did farming create a stable food supply?Exit Ticket/Daily Assessment of Mastery (attach):Assessment:1. Which was not an effect of the end of the last Ice Age?A. Ice melted away in many areas.B. Climates around the world became warmer.C. Populations of large animals, like wooly mammoths, increased.D. Land became more fertile for farming.2. When did the Neolithic Revolution take place? _________________ years ago OR __________________BC/BCE3. Which factor contributed the most to humans changing their lifestyles from hunting and gathering tofarming?A. Desire to settle in one area and build comfortable shelter.B. Scarcity of food supply.C. Availability of sophisticated iron tools.D. Need for a healthier, well-balanced diet.4. In what two ways did farming lead to a stable food supply? Explain your answer in complete sentences.
  2. 2. 1) Warm Up – Do Now:1. Place given events on a timeline in chronological order: 2 million BC – Paleolithic/Old Stone Age begins, 1.5million BC – Homo Erectus learns to make fire, 35,000 BC – Homo sapien sapiens used spears to hunt;18,000 BC – Humans migrate across Bering Land Bridge, 8,000 BC a BIG change happens! (events will begiven out of order)2. Why was the life of a hunter-gatherer difficult? Using your knowledge base from last week, explain whatdifficulties and/or dangers hunter-gatherers had to deal with (Hint: food, clothing, shelter, tools, fire).2) Intro (connect to previous lesson) and Hook: • T will connect to previous lesson by going over Do Now. (Push scholars to use the term scarcity when talking about food supply) • T will begin lesson by doing a T-P-S: What is a revolution? What revolutions do you know about? (S will be familiar with American Revolution) • T will explain that a revolution is a BIG CHANGE—S should connect this to question #1 on the Do Now. T will explain that today we need to find out what BIG CHANGE, or revolution early humans went through.3) Lesson Development (“I” or “I/We”): Key Vocabulary: • S will identify today’s objectives. • To get started, S will do a chain read. Some S will be given numbered note cards. They will read their cards Neolithic Revolution/New Stone Age – Began aloud in order while the rest of the class listens. 10,000 years ago (8,000 BC); humans began farming • T will check comprehension by asking the following and became settled questions: Sedentary Lifestyle – settled, living in one place 1. In what ways did the physical/natural environment of the with permanent shelter Earth change when the last Ice Age came to an end? Agriculture – planting and harvesting crops for food 2. How did people have to change their hunting when the Domestication – taming wild animals to be useful last Ice Age came to an end? Why? (food and labor) for humans 3. What was the BIG change that happened? How did the end of the Ice Age make this possible?  Before moving on, T will CFU with multiple-choice question:Which was an effect of the end of the last Ice Age? A. Forests grew and land became more fertile. B. Populations of small animals, like wild pig, increased. C. Melting glaciers caused sea levels to rise. D. All of the above. • T will re-introduce key vocabulary (already in chain read) for today’s lesson. S will write down definition and draw quick sketch for each.4) Guided Practice (“We”): Key questions to ask during GP: • T will guide S in filling out cause and effect flow chart. Chart will show that the combination of the ending Ice Why were farmers able to settle down in one area, Age, and the disadvantages associated with a hunter- while hunter-gatherers had to live a nomadic life? gatherer lifestyle, led to the Neolithic Revolution. • S will need to read in partners to find answer the What was the food supply like for hunter- question: How did humans create a stable supply of food gatherers? What was the food supply like for during the Neolithic Age? T will fill this information into farmers? Which food supply would you rather the flow chart. have? • T will circulate to CFU and ensure all scholars are on-task and giving 100% effort.
  3. 3. 5) Independent (or pair / small group) Practice (“You”): • S will work independently to answer the following questions: 1. What was the BIG CHANGE that occurred 10,000 years ago? 2. What caused this BIG CHANGE? Include both reasons discussed in class, and support your answer with details from your notes. 3. How did the effects of this BIG CHANGE allow humans to create a stable food supply? Include both effects discussed in class, and support your answer with details from your notes.6) Closure (re-state the OBJECTIVE):  S will share-out answers to IP.  T will encourage S to connect back to the idea of revolution—why was this change so BIG?Homework:  Reading comprehension with questions on today’s content; spiral questions on latitude and longitude.
  4. 4. Teacher: McLaren Date: September 20, 2011 Subject: 6th Social Studies Unit/Topic: The Earliest CommunitiesBig Goal (BAG)/Essential Questions (EQ): GLE(s): 18. Describe the causes, effects, or impact of a given historical th development or event in world civilizations (H-1A-M3) • 100% of 6 grade scholars will be college- 22, Describe features of the earliest communities (H-1C-M1) bound and on the Pathway to Success by 24. Explain how geographical features influenced development of working toward mastery of all 6th grade Social early civilizations (e.g., domestication, cultivation, specialization) Studies skills. (H-1C-M2) 25. Explain why agricultural societies developed from hunters and • 89% of 6th grade scholars will score Basic or gatherers (H-1C-M2) above on the iLEAP. 26. Discuss the climatic changes and human modifications of the physical environment that gave rise to the domestication of plantsWhat did it mean to be human during prehistory? and animals and new sources of clothing (H-1C-M2) 30. Describe the development of agricultural societies and individual communities in Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean 1. How did the physical and natural environment basin, and temperate Europe, including the role of plow affect the way that humans lived during technology (H-1C-M4) prehistory? 2. How did relationships affect the way humans lived during prehistory? 3. How did ideas about the world, nature and the cosmos affect the way humans lived during prehistory?Objectives: SWBAT… Materials Needed:1. Explain how the Neolithic Revolution changed theway humans lived.Exit Ticket/Daily Assessment of Mastery (attach):Assessment:1. Which was not an effect of the Neolithic Revolution?A. Tribes faced food shortages.B. People built permanent shelters.C. Communities traded with each other for different resources.D. People became skilled tool makers.2. What was one benefit of the new human lifestyle in the Neolithic/New Stone Age?A. Brick houses protected humans from harsh weather.B. People divided work and became skilled at their craft (job).C. People gained ideas and knowledge from other communities when trading resources.D. All of the above.3. In the Neolithic/New Stone Age, people formed larger communities. Some even formed villages or towns.How did living in a larger community make the lives of early humans safer?1) Warm Up – Do Now:1. What was the BIG CHANGE that occurred 10,000 years ago, and what caused it? Remember that therewere two reasons why this BIG CHANGE happened!2. How did this BIG CHANGE create a stable food supply? Remember that there were two ways humanscreated a stable food supply because of the BIG CHANGE!2) Intro (connect to previous lesson) and Hook: • T will invest scholars on the concept that time is a valuable thing. • T will have S write down (timed) everything that they do within a period of 24 hours (T will model so that S are specific in their lists). T will have a couple S volunteer answers. T will then ask, how much
  5. 5. of your day do you spend trying to find food? T will get S to see that we spend little to no time searching for food. Because of the big change that we talked about yesterday—farming—we can find food easily—at the grocery store, at a restaurant, or served to us by our parents of the school cafeteria. That means we can spend the rest of the day doing other things—having hobbies, learning different subjects, enjoying time with friends and family. • T will contrast this to a hunter-gatherer lifestyle—these humans had to spend all their time searching for food. This meant that they had no time left over for other things. This all changed because of the Neolithic Revolution. Today, we are going to focus on how valuable time was to improving the lives of early humans.3) Lesson Development (“I” or “I/We”): Key Vocabulary: • T will go over the day’s objective: Scholars will be able to explain how the Neolithic Revolution changed the way Sedentary lifestyle – settling in one place and humans lived. building permanent shelter • T will go over Key Points and Vocabulary for the day’s lesson: The Neolithic Revolution (beginning of farming) Specialization – having one job and becoming caused major changes to the way humans lived. These skilled, or good, at it. changes affected 5 major features of human life: food supply, shelter, jobs, population, and trade. Surplus – extra food supply. • T will emphasize that all these lifestyle changes are effects of farming (connect back to day’s objective). T will explain that this is a very important concept, and we can use a song to help us remember this chain of effects. T will introduce “Old McHumans Had a Farm.” • S will sing through once before starting guided practice.4) Guided Practice (“We”): Key questions to ask during GP: • S will work in partners to read pages 27-31 in textbook. In what ways did the lives of humans As partners read, they will need to fill-in graphic organizer become more comfortable during the with details from reading about how farming affected Neolithic/New Stone Age? human food supply, shelter, jobs, population, and trade (T will model first). T will circulate to ensure S are on- In what ways did the lives of humans task and identifying key details. become safer during the Neolithic/New • If partners finish early, they can “Take the Challenge” of Stone Age? making scenarios for a farmer simulation game. • T will bring whole class together to review notes from Key points from reading: reading. T will mark S answers on the Promethean board and have S check their graphic organizers to make sure 1. Food supply – agriculture and they have all key details. domestication created a stable • S will sing “Old McHuman’s Had a Farm” once through food supply. Humans no longer before starting independent practice, in order to had to deal with food scarcity, but summarize main points. were left with food surplus. 2. Shelter – because of the stable food supply, humans could have a sedentary lifestyle, meaning that they could settle in one place and build permanent shelter. Because
  6. 6. they were going to stay in the same shelter, they could put the time and effort to making the shelter safer and more comfortable. 3. Jobs – because of the stable food supply, there was more time for people to do other things. Humans began dividing up work and giving people special jobs (specialization). People became skilled at their jobs and created new goods for the community (ex. Basket weavers). 4. Population– because of the stable food supply, more mouths could be fed and more people could survive. Instead of living in tribes of 20-30 people, humans formed larger communities. This also led to specialization (more people to do different things). Larger communities also had the ability to defend themselves from enemies. 5. Trade – because of humans’ new sedentary lifestyle, they were limited to the resources available in their area. For the first time, humans traded with each other for resources and goods (products of surplus and specialization). When new communities came in contact with each other, they also shared ideas.5) Independent (or pair / small group) Practice (“You”): • S will work independently to translate notes from graphic organizer into coherent, complete sentences, with detailed support, by answering the following questions: 1. What was the Neolithic Revolution, and when did it take place? 2. How did the Neolithic Revolution affect food supply? 3. How did the Neolithic Revolution affect shelter? 4. How did the Neolithic Revolution affect jobs? 5. How did the Neolithic Revolution affect population? 6. How did the Neolithic Revolution affect trade?  Advanced scholars: contrast each to Paleolithic Age within each answer.6) Closure (re-state the OBJECTIVE): • T will ask S to restate the day’s objective. • T will have S do a T-P-S on essential question: How did the physical and natural environment affect the way that humans lived during prehistory?Homework: • HW from Monday (didn’t get to it)
  7. 7. Teacher: McLaren Date: September 20, 2011 Subject: 6th Social Studies Unit/Topic: The Earliest CommunitiesBig Goal (BAG)/Essential Questions (EQ): GLE(s): 18. Describe the causes, effects, or impact of a given historical th development or event in world civilizations (H-1A-M3) • 100% of 6 grade scholars will be college- 22, Describe features of the earliest communities (H-1C-M1) bound and on the Pathway to Success by 24. Explain how geographical features influenced development of working toward mastery of all 6th grade Social early civilizations (e.g., domestication, cultivation, specialization) Studies skills. (H-1C-M2) 25. Explain why agricultural societies developed from hunters and • 89% of 6th grade scholars will score Basic or gatherers (H-1C-M2) above on the iLEAP. 26. Discuss the climatic changes and human modifications of the physical environment that gave rise to the domestication of plants
  8. 8. What did it mean to be human during prehistory? and animals and new sources of clothing (H-1C-M2) 30. Describe the development of agricultural societies and individual communities in Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean 1. How did the physical and natural environment basin, and temperate Europe, including the role of plow affect the way that humans lived during technology (H-1C-M4) prehistory? 2. How did relationships affect the way humans lived during prehistory? 3. How did ideas about the world, nature and the cosmos affect the way humans lived during prehistory?Objectives: SWBAT… Materials Needed:1. Identify specific differences and similarities betweenhuman lifestyles during the Paleolithic Age/Old StoneAge and the Neolithic Age/New Stone Age.2. Using specific details, outline and draft an essaycomparing and contrasting human lifestyles during thePaleolithic Age/Old Stone Age and the NeolithicAge/New Stone Age.Exit Ticket/Daily Assessment of Mastery (attach):Assessment:1) Warm Up – Do Now:2) Intro (connect to previous lesson) and Hook: • T will solicit scholars to participate in “story time” role play of Ogg, a hunter-gatherer, and Ulana, a farmer. Role play will show Ulana trying to convince Ogg that her way of life is better. (Story taken from Enjoying Global History.)
  9. 9. 3) Lesson Development (“I” or “I/We”): Key Vocabulary: • Double t-chart, advantages and disadvantages of P Age and N Age, categorized by lifestyle feature Specialization – having one job and becoming skilled, or good, at it. Ulana specialized in basket • T will remind scholars that we are already familiar with weaving. Because this was her only job, she had the Ogg’s lifestyle and all its disadvantages. We are also time to become a skilled (good) basket weaver. familiar with the climate changes that occurred at the end of the last Ice Age. We learned yesterday how these two Surplus – extra food supply. The farmers in Ulana’s factors (lifestyle disadvantages and climate change) led to town made more grain than the community could a BIG change 10,000 years ago—farming. eat. The extra grain is called a surplus. The • T will pose this question—was the farming lifestyle really community’s trader would trade the food surplus better than that of the hunter-gatherer lifestyle? If so, and the town’s specialized goods (like Ulana’s why? This is what we will need to uncover today. baskets) with other communites.4) Guided Practice (“We”): Key questions to ask during GP: •5) Independent (or pair / small group) Practice (“You”): • S will be asked to think back to the beginning of class, when we role-played the story of Ogg and Ulana. S will remember how Ulana was trying to convince Ogg, a hunter-gatherer, that farming was a better way of life. S will remember that Ogg ended up agreeing with Ulana and transitioning into a farming life-style (pitfall: emphasize that this transition occurred very slowly—over thousands of years —not in a snap decision). • Independently, S will need to write a RAFT, from the perspective of a hunter-gatherer choosing to transition into a farming lifestyle (Role – hunter-gatherer during Neolithic Revolution, Audience – scholars of history, Format – paragraph-long letter, Topic – why I decided to change my lifestyle). S will be expected to use graphic organizer and notes from guided practice to explain why they are making this transition. Within their RAFT, S will need to identify the most important reason why they are choosing to change their lifestyle. Thus, exemplar answer would describe factors such as climate/environmental change, desire for safety and comfort, ETC., but would also highlight food scarcity as the most important factor. • S with exceptional needs will be given paragraph skeleton to complete assignment. S with literacy needs will receive sentence starters for assignment. All other S will be challenged to write coherent, organized paragraph without additional support.
  10. 10. 6) Closure (re-state the OBJECTIVE):  T will ask a couple scholars to share their RAFT with the class. S will share-out positive feedback for their peers—emphasizing whether or not their peer seems to have mastered the day’s objective.Homework: • Basic: Draw a picture representing the Neolithic lifestyle, including the 5 main features we discussed in class: food supply, shelter, jobs, population, and trade. Label each feature of your drawing. • Mastery: Draw a picture representing the Neolithic lifestyle, including the 5 main features we discussed in class: food supply, shelter, jobs, population, and trade. Label each feature of your drawing AND include a two-sentence description of each.  Advanced: Draw TWO pictures, one representing the Paleolithic lifestyle and one representing the Neolithic lifestyle, each including the 5 main features we discussed in class: food supply, shelter, jobs, population, and trade. Label each feature of your drawings AND include a two-sentence description of each. Objective: SWBAT… INM:  T will model comparing and contrasting Paleolithic Age and Neolithic Age by using Venn Diagram (will highlight only main ideas…save details for S to uncover during GP). Guided Practice:  S will work in pairs to brainstorm compare and contrast details for lifestyle features of the Paleolithic Age and Neolithic Age (Food, Shelter, Tools, Jobs, Clothing, Trade). T will model finding a detail (versus repeating a main idea); have class practice finding a detail.  S will use textbook, notes, and graphic organizers from previous lessons to develop details.  S will be given pieces of three different color sentence strips. S will use colored sentence strips for contrasting details (Paleolithic – green, Neolithic – pink) and white sentence strips for comparison details.  S will need to come up with at least one detail for each lifestyle feature. S will place detail strips in pocket charts (organized by lifestyle feature).  Class will discuss details together before beginning independent practice. Independent Practice:  Given outline template, S will outline compare and contrast essay using details from guided practice. Higher-level scholars will be challenged to incorporate details of cause and effect within their compare and contrast essay.
  11. 11. Day 2: lower-scholars…revise and edit before publishing…higher scholars, push to citesourcesHow to teach cause and effect—matching cards…day 1: cause and effect read…give outcards, have s read in sequence (color code-put in pocket chart so whole class can see);day 2: give each student a cause, find their partner who is the effectAdvanced: study Jericho and catal huyuk CAUSES of Neolithic Revolution 1. review disadvantages of HG lifestyle (scarcity, danger, discomfort) 2. end of ice age…effects 3. combo of 1&2  Neolithic revolution (agriculture and domestication, sedentary lifestyle) (talk about effects of sedentary lifestyle on Tuesday  review 1 and intro 2/3 with chain reading, take notes on vocab/key points to reinforce 4. farming doesn’t work everywhere…had to find a place with ideal conditions OR adapt to environment  partner reading (need text!) on ideal conditions and adaptations early farms made (puzzle text?) OR different locations…move info from table to table…short description…whats good whats bad…adaptations needed to be made  disucss answers WC  independent practice = 1. explain disadvantages of HG lifestyle 2. explain effects of end of ice age 3. explain ideal conditions for farming (speech to tribe about where to move and why) EFFECTS of Neolithic Revolution 1. role play – introduce idea that one lifestyle is better than the other 2. INM – Old McHumans and key vocab 3. GP – partner reading (stable food supply, permanent shelters, communities/pop growth, new jobs/specialization, trade); find details to support song stanzas, use GO 4. IP – RAFT…why you would change lifestyle
  12. 12. Reinforce paleo/neo differences by contrasting lifestyle features (food supply, shelter,communities/pop, jobs, trade) 1. model how to use sentence strips by giving big ideas 2. have partners work together to write down details 3. work toward writing assignment?? • T will remind scholars of the game they played on Friday, during which they drew cards which had different scenarios they may have faced as a hunter- gatherer. T will pose the question: Did it seem like you had a stable food supply? (No-scarcity) • T will remind scholars of how farmers created a stable food supply (agriculture and domestication). T will explain that, for IP, S will create their own scenario cards for life as a farmer. T will emphasize that because farmers had a stable food supply, most of the scenario cards should end by saying, “Take one food card from the pile.”T will model how to write one scenario card using the text from GP. T will ask S toturn and talk and come up with a scenario with someone sitting next to them.Before beginning, T will also challenge S to think about things that could go wrongwith agriculture or domestication, and ask them to make one card that ends bysaying, “Put one food card back in the pile.”S will share-out scenario cards. T will push them to connect their scenario either toagriculture or domestication.

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