Norton Online Living Report




      09
Introduction
         The role of the Internet in our world continues to grow
         and evolve. Just as it revolutioniz...
Can Technology   It just might—seven in 10 adults worldwide say that
                 the Internet has made their relation...
• Nearly 60% of online adults have made a                  • 1 in 5 adults flirt online, 1 in 3 in India and Brazil
    fr...
The “E-Family”                                            • 99% feel satisfied with time spent with family,
              ...
The Internet is kids’ new backyard, where they
 spend an average of 39 hours a month, nearly twice
    as much time as the...
What else are kids doing online? Last year’s Norton           • 33% of parents say it’s hard to create rules for
Online Li...
So You Think   One of the most surprising statistics that we found
                 in this year’s Norton Online Living Re...
In spite of all this bad news, people overwhelmingly
agree that the benefits of using the Internet outweigh
the risks. Onl...
Methodology
       The Norton Online Living Report survey was conducted
       online in 12 countries (the United States, ...
Online Living:   The Internet is continually making the world a smaller
                     place, but significant differ...
Brazil                                                    Canada
 • Of the 12 countries surveyed, kids in Brazil spend    ...
China                                                     France
 • At 83%, online adults in China say they are           ...
Germany                                                   India
 • Online adults in Germany report the highest level      ...
Italy                                                      Japan
 • Italy reports the most agreement between how          ...
Sweden                                                      United Kingdom
 • Sweden is the only country where the Interne...
United States
 • U.S. kids have an average of 83 online friends, the
   highest number among the 12 countries surveyed

 •...
Additional
     Findings
Maintaining Social Graces                                           Canada (93%), and the U.S. (93%) report never
        ...
For the Love of Cars
When given a short list of items and asked which of these
could they live without, a majority of onli...
Birds and Bees or Bits
and Bytes?
Among difficult issues that parents and adults discuss
with children, it is surprising h...
Two Schools of Thought                                          valuable to children as reading a traditional book:as
    ...
(52%), and Sweden (49%) also agree that online                 UK (61%),
      messaging and texting make learning to writ...
Interestingly, in several countries, parents and adults are
most likely to report that the Internet makes no difference
in...
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Norton Online Report

  1. 1. Norton Online Living Report 09
  2. 2. Introduction The role of the Internet in our world continues to grow and evolve. Just as it revolutionized the way we find information, experience entertainment and do business, it’s transforming our social lives in profound ways as well. For the second year, Symantec commissioned the Norton Online Living Report to monitor and provide insight into rapidly changing technology, Internet usage and the social impact on individuals and families. This year’s report surveyed 9,000 online adults and kids in 12 countries—the U.S., Canada, UK, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden, China, Japan, India, Australia and Brazil—with results that are both surprising and informative about the impact of technology on relationships, parenting and security.
  3. 3. Can Technology It just might—seven in 10 adults worldwide say that the Internet has made their relationships better. Today’s frenzied world makes it challenging for people Buy You Love? to stay in touch. The good news is that a wide array of technologies, including webcams, IM, photo shar- ing and social networking, make it easier than ever to stay connected. Even President Obama, in one of the world’s highest-pressure job, uses his BlackBerry and webcam to stay connected to family and friends. How are people connecting? • Email is the baseline with 92% using it to communicate with friends and family • 42% use webcams, with very high usage in China (74%), India (68%), Brazil (66%) and France (53%) • Half of adults use social networking • 7 in 10 access photos online and use IM • 24% use a Twitter-like service One of the clear benefits of technology is its ability to connect (or re-connect) people far and wide. We’re making more and more of our friends through the Internet, and blurring the line between the virtual world and physical world. Symantec Corporation ©2009 1
  4. 4. • Nearly 60% of online adults have made a • 1 in 5 adults flirt online, 1 in 3 in India and Brazil friend this way, and have an average of 41 online friends • 14% have rekindled romantic relationships, especially in India (37%) and Brazil (25%) • Adults in China (86%), India (83%) and Brazil (82%) are most likely to make friends online, • 1 in 4 have shared a secret online while those in France (32%) and Japan (38%) • 1 in 4 find it easier to discuss touchy subjects are the least likely to make friends online online than in person or by phone • Males tend to have more online friends than • In China and India it’s nearly 2 in 4 that feel that females do way and their kids agree • Three in four have gone on to meet someone in • Kids in Japan (6%) and Germany (7%) are the person whom they originally met online least likely to agree that touchy subjects are • In Japan and China, adults are less likely to meet easier to discuss online online friends in the physical world because they • 1 in 5 online adults sometimes criticize other fear their online personas are smarter, funnier people’s comments or ideas, more often in Brazil and better-looking 37% or China 35% or India 27% vs. Sweden 8% • 56% have used the Internet to reconnect and Japan 8% with old friends • 1 in 10 sometimes make fun of other people online but 3 in 10 in India are most likely to do so Aside from allowing people to forge new relation- • Nearly 1 in 10 in India and Brazil admit to ships, the Internet also helps strengthen existing ties, sending an “flaming” email rekindle romance or get personal. While some admit to These days, families may be spread throughout the negative behavior online, for the most part the Internet country or even the globe. School, work and friends all is a positive and central vehicle for communication and compete for time that might otherwise be spent with connection. In fact, six in 10 adults say they could not family. The economic downturn has tightened the reins live without it. further, demanding even more of parents who might already be working full-time jobs to begin with, and making it harder to travel. For many, the Internet is a versatile solution for bridging these gaps. • 71% report that the Internet makes keeping in touch with family easier • 53% report that it has improved the quality of communications • 45% report that the Internet has improved their family relationships overall Symantec Corporation ©2009 2
  5. 5. The “E-Family” • 99% feel satisfied with time spent with family, compared with 50% overall • Two-thirds say that the Internet has improved A unique segment we call the “E-Family” their relationship with their family vs. 45% overall makes up 14% of the online population, has strong family ties and high Internet • Spend 7 more hours/week online than families that report weak ties online and offline usage. More than two-thirds of this group say that the Internet has improved their • 9 in 10 say their children follow family rules for being online, compared with 8 in 10 overall family relationships. • 9 in 10 have a good knowledge of computers, compared with 6 in 10 overall • 9 in 10 like agree they are one of the first out of their friends or family to check out new technologies, compared with 6 in 10 overall • 62% have a profile on a social networking site, compared with 49% overall So does technology buy you love? It can certainly help, as evidenced by people emailing, using a webcam, or chatting up a storm at more than 100 hours in some countries. Family and friends are buzzing online—getting personal, romantic, spilling secrets, flaming or getting just plain touchy. Some—like the “E-Family”—are trendsetters who have turned technology into a family asset. The rest of us know we can’t live without it and continue to consume more of it. TIPS 1. Try something new to connect with friends and family—whether sharing photos and videos or looking up old friends 2. Use caution when looking for love online— the Internet can be a great place to find romance, but don’t forget the basics of safety and security apply to the virtual world as much as the physical world 3. Keep a balance—these days, the line be- tween online and offline is blurred. Make sure to balance your online social life with “real-world” social activities Symantec Corporation ©2009 3
  6. 6. The Internet is kids’ new backyard, where they spend an average of 39 hours a month, nearly twice as much time as their parents think they spend. Parents are still waking up to the fact that parenting now includes the Internet. Just as they worry about what their kids eat, how they are doing in school and who their friends are, they need to be involved in their online lives Do You Know Where Your Kids Are...Online? Last year’s Norton Online Living Report identified Surprisingly, TV reigns over Internet and cell phone as that kids are very active online, going online for school the most important technology in kids’ lives. However, projects (94%), entertainment (62%), games (96%) kids are highly active online. and shopping (49%). This year, they’re online even • 86% of kids send text messages more. In fact, six in 10 adults worldwide say kids spend “too much” time online, and what’s • 73% of kids email from their phones more, 45% of kids agree. • 23% are using a Twitter-like service While a majority of adults feel their kids spend too • Kids on average are spending 3 hours/week much time online, we found two schools of thought texting: kids in the U.S. text the most at 10 regarding the Internet’s impact on education. Overall, hours/week, while kids in Japan and Germany adults are evenly split on whether reading online text the least at 1 hour/week vs. adults who spend 2 hours/week texting is as valuable as reading a book. They are also of two minds about whether writing skills are hindered by • 92% of kids socialize with family and friends communicating through email and IM. Interestingly, online, approximately 5 hours a week kids are equally divided on these questions. • 55% of kids have made friends online, up from 45% of kids in countries surveyed last year and have an average of 37 online friends. U.S. kids have the most friends at 82, and kids in Japan have the fewest at 13 Symantec Corporation ©2009 4
  7. 7. What else are kids doing online? Last year’s Norton • 33% of parents say it’s hard to create rules for Online Living Report found that 1 in 5 kids admitted Internet use because it wasn’t around when to conducting activities that their parents wouldn’t they were kids approve of. This year, 1 in 5 got caught! In Canada, • 22% of kids go online at a friend’s house, Sweden and Brazil, 1 in 3 parents caught their kids making it challenging for parents to provide engaging in online activities they don’t approve of. supervsion (53% of parents in Sweden report Perhaps not surprisingly, more parents are spying on their child connects to the Internet at a friend’s house, 9% in Japan and 13% in Italy) their kids online, 33% compared to 25% last year, and reprimanding them for breaking (34%) Internet rules. As the Internet becomes a larger and larger part of As we have seen from well-publicized examples of our lives, establishing boundaries for online activity worst-case scenarios—from the Megan Meier case between parents and children is increasingly vital. to “sexting” to cyberbullying—risky behavior online Like anything else, open dialogue and clear expecta- can have serious consequences. tions are the most important steps. You don’t have to “out-tech” your kids to protect them online. On a positive note, kids are starting to open the door online to their parents and even their grandparents, effectively closing the generation gap. • 1 in 4 kids are “friending” their parents online. Brazilian kids are the most open with 7 in 10 kids including their parents on their buddy lists, 8 in 10 on their email contact lists, and 6 in 10 on their social networking site TIPS • Kids in Japan are the least likely to have one of their parents as an online contact: 39% have a 1. Have “The Talk” frequently and establish parent on their email contact list, while only realistic rules. Engage in dialogue about who, 9% have a parent as a contact/friend on their what and where your kids are online but online social networking site profile make it fun, not an interrogation • 10% of kids use new technologies (IM, social 2. Deploy basic preventative security networking, texting, email) to connect with measures—an all-in-one security suite their grandparents and parental controls 3. Participate in their lives online—in addition In other signs of progress, parents recognize that they to joining their kids in texting, IM’ing and are responsible for keeping their kids safe online. They social networking, parents can learn more are taking measures such as talking to their kids about about their kids by looking at their online videos, photos and status updates, or online safety (70%) and setting parental controls even “Googling” them (33%), but many don’t know where to start. Supervi- sion is inherently difficult when it comes to the online world. Not only is the Web’s content available to any- one with a search engine, it’s easy for kids to bypass parents altogether by logging on from outside the household. • 7 in 10 kids have rules for using the Internet; and parents and kids concur that they are following the rules 80% of the time • 70% of parents are now talking to their kids about online safety (up 20% from last year) • 90% of parents worldwide see that it’s their responsibility to keep their kids safe online Symantec Corporation ©2009 5
  8. 8. So You Think One of the most surprising statistics that we found in this year’s Norton Online Living Report was that 99% of those surveyed say they take steps to secure You’re Secure? their personal information. The reality, however, is that most people still fall short, despite the fact that many have experienced the pain of being hacked, losing data or having their computer crash. What’s causing this security paradox? One factor is lack of awareness about today’s threat environment. Instead of widespread, headline-making virus out- breaks, cybercriminals are targeting people’s pock- etbooks, using spam and phishing to gather credit card and financial account information. Consumers are relying on outdated virus scanners that don’t ad- dress new threats such as bots, worms, spyware and drive-by downloads. The other danger is complacency. Most people are taking some take steps to protect themselves online but leaving themselves vulnerable by visiting untrusted Web sites (46%), not backing up data (55%), not changing passwords frequently (67%) and giving out personal information online (33%). • Adults in India (67%), Italy (68%) and Japan (72%) are least likely to install security software • 2 in 10 (globally) still don’t have security software installed • Another 2 in 10 do not run virus scans frequently • Over half of adults in Japan (55%) and 1 in 4 (globally) report a lack of confidence that their personal information online is secure • Roughly half of online adults have experienced either a hard drive crash and lost irreplaceable data or had someone break into their computer Symantec Corporation ©2009 6
  9. 9. In spite of all this bad news, people overwhelmingly agree that the benefits of using the Internet outweigh the risks. Online technologies have the potential to connect our lives in ways that were all but impossible in the recent past. Without the right security, however, we run the risk of inviting in more problems than we solve. Fortunately, a combination of awareness and proactive precaution can keep our online experiences safe, positive and enriching. • Online adults (89%) and online children (90%) overwhelmingly agree that the benefits of using the Internet outweigh the risks • Adults would give up their cars or digital music players before giving up Internet access Online security is like insurance. You wouldn’t drive without car insurance, and you shouldn’t surf, Tweet or Facebook, without comprehensive online security. It may seem daunting, but you don’t have to know what a bot is to protect yourself online. TIPS 1. Choose a comprehensive Internet security suite and backup your important data. Antivirus alone is not enough for today’s threat environment 2. Use common sense—don’t use the same password for multiple accounts, don’t share personal information, don’t open or click on links in emails from people you don’t know 3. Get a tune-up for your PC. You get a tune-up from your car at least twice a year; you use your PC just as much. A tune-up helps identify deep-rooted threats, protects it from crashes and can make the performance of your PC feel like new Symantec Corporation ©2009 7
  10. 10. Methodology The Norton Online Living Report survey was conducted online in 12 countries (the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden, China, Japan, India, Australia, and Brazil) by Harris Interactive on behalf of Symantec between October 13th and December 5th, 2008 among 6,427 adults 18 years old and older (including 1,297 parents of children ages 8-17) and 2,614 children aged 8-17 who spend one or more hours online each month. Results were weighted as needed to be rep- resentative of the online population of adults and children for each country. Throughout this report, global totals refer to the simple, combined percentage of the 12 countries. All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often impossible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words “margin of error” as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal. Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the com- position of the online population in each of the countries surveyed. Because the sample is based on members of the Harris Interactive online research panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.
  11. 11. Online Living: The Internet is continually making the world a smaller place, but significant differences still remain. Of the 12 countries surveyed, a surprising variance emerged on Global Differences questions regarding adoption of technology, communi- cation between parents and children about online activities, and the Internet’s impact on socializing, learning and culture. The following facts highlight these differences. Australia • Among all the countries surveyed, Australia’s online parents are most likely to agree, "I always know what my children are looking at online (86%); however, only two-thirds (65%) of Australian kids agree, "my parents know what I am looking at when I am online." This is the largest gap in all countries. • Confidence in the knowledge of what their child does online is highest in Australia (86%) • Among all countries surveyed, the average number of children online parents have is 2.0; however Australian online parents report the highest number of children in their households (2.8) • Australian adults are most likely to believe that children spend too much time online (65% agreement compared to the UK, France, Japan, India) • Along with India, adults in Australia are most likely to agree that the Internet has eased the learning process (89% India, 86% Australia) • Though 90% of Australian youth agree that the Internet has made learning much easier for children today, 63% feel that email, instant messaging, text messaging and posting on social networking web sites or blogs make it harder for children today to learn to write well • Online Australian adults are most likely to report the Internet is slow (34%) and one in three (72%) feel this slowness has to do with their Internet connection • Australians rank their cars at the top of their list of things that they can’t live without (50%), followed by Internet access (46%) and TV (45%) • Australia ranked third in the list of countries in which online adults are most unaware of services like Twitter, which allow short but frequent contact between individuals (Sweden [30%], the U.K. [27%], Australia [25%]) Symantec Corporation ©2009 9
  12. 12. Brazil Canada • Of the 12 countries surveyed, kids in Brazil spend • At 89%, online adults in Canada report the highest the most time online (70 hours per month), while level of parental responsibility for protecting parents in Brazil believe their kids spend 56 hours their children online per month online • Parents in Canada are most likely to report being • Kids in Brazil are the most inclusive of their extremely/very knowledgeable in discussing parents, with 70% including their parents on their Internet activities in which their children buddy lists, 79% including their parents on their participate, particularly websites frequently visited email contact lists, and 60% including their parents (73%) and sharing personal information on the as a contact on their social networking site Internet (84%). They feel least knowledgeable discussing family finances (57%) • 75% of online parents in Brazil feel very or extremely knowledgeable discussing sex with their • At 45%, Canada has the lowest percentage of children, the highest among the countries surveyed online adults who say they are among the first of (on average, 41% of online parents feel very/ their friends and family to check out a new extremely knowledgeable discussing sex with technology, compared to 62% globally their kids) • Of all the countries surveyed, Canadian kids (39%) • 72% of online parents in Brazil feel more are least likely to have their parent in their cell knowledgeable discussing sex with their kids than phone address book discussing family finances (72%) or the websites their child visits (66%) • One in three Canadian parents have caught their child online engaging in activity they don’t • Of all countries surveyed, online adults in Brazil approve of spend the most time sharing photos online, at four hours per week • 68% of online parents in Canada report the Internet has improved their relationship with • Kids in Brazil socialize online to a greater extent their family than those in other countries, at 13 hours per week • 95% of online parents in Canada report having • 74% of adults in Brazil IM with family members high levels of involvement in their kids’ lives at least once a week, compared with 43% of adults globally • 89% of online parents in Canada feel they can talk to their child about almost anything • Two-thirds of online parents in Brazil admit they have monitored their children’s Internet usage by • Almost three-quarters of adults (73%) and an even reading their email or tracking websites they higher numbers of parents (77%) in Canada visited using cookies believe that children spend too much time online, in contrast to just over half of children (54%) who • 48% of online parents in Brazil are likely to have believe children spend too much time online reprimanded their child for inappropriate online behavior • Canadian adults (62%), parents (65%) and kids (58%), to a lesser degree, see time spent • Parental confidence in Brazil is high—74% are online by kids as wasting time confident they know what their child is looking at online; the children tell a similar story, as 72% • One-third of Canadian kids have parents as a of kids report their parents know what they are contact on their social networking website doing online Symantec Corporation ©2009 10
  13. 13. China France • At 83%, online adults in China say they are • At 78%, kids in France were most likely to report among the first of their friends and family to that online messaging techniques and texting check out a new technology, the highest of the make learning to write well more difficult . countries surveyed and compared to 62% overall. In China, adults (47%) and parents (43%) are • Online French parents (6%) are least likely to by far most likely to report that the Internet consider their child to be their friend actually makes educating their children harder. • About three in four French kids feel the Internet • Online parents in China (70%) are among the has made learning much easier for children today, most likely to trust parental controls the lowest, with Italy, of all the countries surveyed • Of all countries surveyed, China feels the strongest • Online French adults are the least likely of the (54%) that Internet security companies have countries surveyed to have sent a flaming email, responsibility for protecting children online as 95% have never done so • When on vacation, Chinese online adults are most • Half of parents in France admit they have likely to talk on a cell phone or send a text monitored their children’s Internet usage by reading message, IM or email to a friend (90%) than a their email or tracking websites they visited family member (83%) • French parents are far more confident that their • The only country surveyed in which less than half children are following family rules for Internet use of adults agree that emailing, online messaging, than the children are reporting (85% parents vs. text messaging, and posting on social networking 71% kids) sites or blogs may impede children from learning • More than half of online adults use webcams. One how to write well is China(46%) in four online adults in France use webcams • Adults and youth in China (52% adults, 56% kids) less than once a month, and only 15% use them are more likely than those in other countries to be at least once a week—less than half the proportion willing to discuss touchy subjects online of online adults who report weekly usage in China, India and Brazil. • 56% of kids in China are more willing to communicate with their family about touchy • Only about one-third of adults in France have made subjects online than on the phone or in person, friends online compared to 33% worldwide • 70% of parents in France are likely to see their • About four in five adults and kids say they child’s time spent on the Internet as time mainly could not live without the Internet (85% adults; learning rather than wasting time, and 66% of 83% kids) kids agree • Overall, 54% of online adults and 66% of online kids find reading on the Internet as valuable for children as reading a book. In China, 79% of parents and 88% of kids find reading on the Internet as valuable for children as reading a book. Symantec Corporation ©2009 11
  14. 14. Germany India • Online adults in Germany report the highest level • About one in four (24%) online adults sometimes of socializing with family or friends in the real share a secret or something personal with world at 23 hours per week. Overall adults in the someone online. Those in India (36%) are most countries surveyed report spending 15 hours per likely to do so. week socializing with family or friends in the real world. • Of all countries surveyed, online adults in India report the most mean hours per week sending • 55% of German parents have had a media-free text messages from a phone (four) day at home, during which their child did not watch TV, go online or use the computer. This is the • Online adults in India (52%) are more likely than highest out of the countries surveyed, compared those in all other countries to say that the Internet with 20% globally. makes it harder to have meaningful conversations with family members • Online parents in Germany are the least dissatisfied (6%) with the amount of fun their • Of all countries surveyed, 14% of online adults family has together report they would miss out on family activities without the Internet. India reports much higher • Kids in Germany (7%) were the least likely to agree levels than other countries. In India, adults (41%) that it is easier to communicate with their family and parents (43%) are much more likely than those about touchy subjects online than on the phone in other countries to say they would miss out on or in person family activities without the Internet • One in three online adults do not use photo-sharing • Online adults in Japan (68%) and India (68%) websites, the lowest use in the countries surveyed are most likely to report their Internet connection is just the right speed • At 78%, German adults are among the least likely to report that since they started using email • Overall, adults in the countries surveyed report and IM, there are some people they never talk to spending 15 mean hours per week socializing on the phone anymore with family or friends in the real world. Online adults in India report the lowest level of • Overall, 10% of kids in all the countries socializing with family or friends in the real surveyed report the risks of using the Internet world at eight mean hours per week outweigh the benefits. Online adults in Germany are the most risk-averse with just over one in four • One in three online kids are more willing to (26%) reporting the risks of using the Internet communicate with their family about touchy outweigh the benefits. subjects online than on the phone or in person. This percentage almost doubles in India (59%). • Overall, 5% of adults in the countries surveyed dislike learning about new websites or Internet • Online adults and parents in India (10% adults, communication tools, with the highest levels 16% parents) feel their children don’t spend of dislike being reported in Germany (12%) enough time online and Japan (12%) • About one-quarter of all online adults surveyed— • One in five online parents in Germany have caught and more than two in five in India—report since their child doing something they don’t approve they started using email and IM, there are some of, but only 9% have reprimanded their child for people they never talk to on the phone anymore such behavior • Among all parents surveyed, one in three (35%) • 0ver one-third of kids agree that online and text agree that their child is more careful online than messaging may obstruct learning to write they are. Almost three in four (72%) online parents for children in India agree that their child is more careful online than they are. • Parental confidence in Germany is extremely high—81% are confident they know what their child is looking at online. The children report a different story as two-thirds of kids report their parents know what they are doing online. Symantec Corporation ©2009 12
  15. 15. Italy Japan • Italy reports the most agreement between how • Online parents in Japan are least likely to set often a parent reports knowing where a child is parental controls (18%), monitor their children online and the percentage of time a child reports online (10%), or discuss safe online habits (10%) that the parents know where they are (77% parents vs. 78% kids) • Online Japanese parents report the lowest incidents of reprimanding (12%) or catching their child doing • At 2%, kids in Italy are least likely to have ignored something online that they do not approve of (3%) an email from a family member, compared with 11% worldwide • More than elsewhere, a large portion of online parents in Japan (40%) report that it is also the • Italy places the least amount of responsibility on child’s responsibility to protect him/herself online children to protect themselves online (7%) and feels that most of the responsibility lies with the • Online adults in Japan report the lowest mean parents (91%) hours per week spent instant messaging from a computer (one hour) and socializing with family • At 13%, Italy has one of the lowest parental or friends online (two hours) reports of children connecting to the Internet at a friend’s house • Online Japanese adults have the largest disagreement with the statements, “I am confident • Half of online parents in Italy admit they have that my personal information online is secure” monitored their children’s Internet usage by (55%) and “I know how to keep my personal reading their email or tracking websites they information secure when using the Internet” (29%) visited using cookies • Online Japanese adults put more responsibility on • 73% of adults in Italy say they are usually the first children (40%) to protect themselves online than of their friends and family to check out a new other countries surveyed and the least amount of technology, compared with three in five worldwide responsibility on parents (80%) than other countries surveyed • Italian parents (60%) are notably less enthusiastic about the Internet as a means to facilitate learning • Japanese adults and kids are much more than most other countries apathetic about the Internet, with 38% of adults and 47% of kids reporting that they neither like • Adults in Italy report not being able to live without nor dislike learning about the Internet Internet access (55%), cell phones (54%) and cars (47%) • Overall 5% of countries surveyed dislike learning about new websites or Internet communication • About one in four online Italian adults do not tools; the highest levels of dislike are reported in know how to keep their personal information Germany (12%) and Japan (12%) secure when using the Internet • Though 62% of kids in Japan feel the Internet • Fewer than one in five Italian adults and kids makes learning easier, this is a lower proportion have/use short text messages like Twitter (15% than in other countries. Japanese adults (16%), adults; 17% kids) parents (12%) and kids (27%) were among the most likely to report that “not enough” time is spent on the Internet by children. • Overall, online adults report their knowledge of using a computer to be terrible/bad 6% of the time, while almost one-quarter of online adults in Japan, reports their knowledge using a computer to be terrible/bad • Only one in four online parents in Japan had discussed sharing personal information on the Internet with their child Symantec Corporation ©2009 13
  16. 16. Sweden United Kingdom • Sweden is the only country where the Internet did • Internet access (49%) tops the chart in the UK for not make the top three list of things they couldn't things that individuals couldn’t live without, live without; instead the top three were cellphone followed by cell phone (42%) and car (41%) (46%), television (46%) and car (39%) • There are major discrepancies between kids' • Kids in Sweden (nine hours) and Brazil (13 hours) reports of time online versus parents' reporting socialize online to a greater extent than those in of their child’s online use. Kids report spending other countries (five hours) twice as much time online as parents estimate (44 hours per month kids vs. 19 hours per • Parents in Sweden were most likely (35%) to have month parents). caught their child engaging in activities that they do not approve of online • At 53%, kids in the UK are the most likely to agree that online messaging and texting make it more • Along with Japan, Swedish parents were least likely difficult for children to learn to write well to set parental controls on family computers (22% for Sweden, 18% for Japan) • Kids in the UK are most likely to stay in touch with their parents via text messaging (29%) • Overall, Swedish parents are among the most likely to say that they can talk to their child about • Kids in the UK (70%) and China (68%) are the anything (88%) most likely to skip technological communications and meet their grandparents in person • Adults and kids in Sweden are least likely to know about services like Twitter (30% adults, • Online adults in the UK (20%) are the least likely 67% kids) to talk on a cell phone, text message, IM or email family, friends, co-workers, boyfriends/girlfriends • 53% of online parents in Sweden report their child on vacation than online adults from the other connects to the Internet at a friend’s house, countries surveyed compared with 22% worldwide • Adults in the UK (6%) are the least likely to ignore • Swedish online parents feel more knowledgeable an email or instant message from a family member discussing sensitive topics such as finances, sex, and drugs than the websites their children are • 54% of online parents in the UK say they have set frequenting (80% finance, 64% sex, 71% drugs, parental controls, higher than the global average vs. 60% frequented websites) of one-third • Half of kids in Sweden agree that online messaging • Parental confidence in the UK is extremely high— and texting make learning to write well harder 81% are confident they know what their child is for children looking at online; the children report a different story—69% of kids report their parents know • In some countries, there was a wide discrepancy what they are doing online between parents and kids regarding parents knowing what their child is looking at online. • Along with Australia, parents in the UK have high However, in Sweden, parents and kids have a high confidence in the knowledge of what their child level of agreement (58% parents vs. 53% kids) does online (Australia [86%], UK [81%]) • Just after India and Australia, adults in the UK are most likely to agree that the Internet makes learning easier for children today (85% agree) Symantec Corporation ©2009 14
  17. 17. United States • U.S. kids have an average of 83 online friends, the highest number among the 12 countries surveyed • Kids in the U.S. are out-texting their global cohorts, at ten hours per week versus four hours per week for the global average • U.S. kids report spending twice as much time online as parents estimate (42 hours per month kids vs. 18 hours per month parents) • 63% of U.S. parents, and 55% of U.S. kids, believe that children spend too much time on the Internet • In the U.S., there is evidence that “early adopters” also use webcams to communicate with friends and family. 55% of online adults who say they are early adopters use webcams. 27% of this group use web- cams at least once a week. • There is a large discrepancy between how often U.S. parents think they know where their child is online and how often kids report their parents know where they are online (73% parents vs. 61% kids) • Half of U.S. kids agree that IM and texting make learning to write more difficult • Almost half of online parents in the U.S. (47%) have reprimanded their child for doing something online they don’t approve of Symantec Corporation ©2009 15
  18. 18. Additional Findings
  19. 19. Maintaining Social Graces Canada (93%), and the U.S. (93%) report never having sent an abusive (flaming) email in an Online World (95%), Canada (93%), and the U.S. (93%) report never having sent an abusive (flaming) email Most adults use the Internet in a positive way. Very few • 3% of online adults have sent an email in an report that they have sent abusive emails or made fun abusive way at least sometimes, but this occurs of other people online. Those in France (95%), Canada more often in India (10%) and Brazil (9%) (93%), and the U.S. (93%) are least likely to have sent • About one-fifth (21%) of online adults sometimes a “flaming” email, while those in India (10%) and Brazil criticize other people’s comments or ideas online at (9%) are most likely to have done so. Adults are more least sometimes, but this happens more often in likely to criticize other people’s comments or ideas online Brazil (37%), China (35%), and India (27%), and than send abusive emails, though the frequency of this less often in Sweden (8%) and Japan (8%) behavior is relatively low: about one in five (21%) report • Online males (63%) are more likely to have criticizing often or sometimes. This behavior is least likely criticized other people’s comments or ideas online to occur in Sweden and Japan (both 8% report doing it at than online females (46%) least sometimes). If an adult has sent an abusive email, • Only about one in ten (12%) online adults criticized someone or made fun of someone online, they sometimes make fun of other people online, but are far more likely to be male than female. those in India (34%) are most likely to do so Most kids are conducting themselves graciously online. In general, few parents (22%) report that they have caught their child doing something they do not approve of online. Parents in Japan (3%) are least likely to report this, while parents in Canada (32%), Sweden (35%), and Brazil (31%) are most likely to have caught their child engaging in activity they don’t approve of. In all countries except for Germany, a greater proportion of parents reprimand their child for inappropriate online behavior than the number who report actually catching their child engaging in such deeds. Even though kids’ engagement in ungracious behavior online is low, about half of parents in Brazil (66%), France (50%), and Italy (50%) have monitored their children’s Internet usage by reading their email or tracking websites they visited using cookies. Parents are least likely to have monitored their children’s Internet usage in Japan (10%), China (22%), and India (24%). While parents in Japan are least likely to set parental controls, monitor their children, or discuss safe online habits, these parents also report the lowest incidents of reprimanding or catching their child doing something online that they do not approve of. Criticizing and Abusive Emails • 88% of online adults report never sending an abusive email • Online males (16%) are more likely to report having sent an abusive email than online females (7%) • More than nine in ten online adults in France (95%), Symantec Corporation ©2009 17
  20. 20. For the Love of Cars When given a short list of items and asked which of these could they live without, a majority of online adults indi- cated they cannot live without Internet access. However, this finding varies by country and gender. Internet access topped the list of necessities for the UK, Germany, Italy, and Brazil. Most adults in the U.S., Canada, France, and Australia would prefer not to live without their car, while adults in China and India are most attached to their cell phones. In fact, adults in China tend to be the most at- tached to all items listed. Women and men don’t vary dra- matically in most cases, though men feel more attached to the data on their computers while women are more attached to their pets and make-up. Symantec Corporation ©2009 18
  21. 21. Birds and Bees or Bits and Bytes? Among difficult issues that parents and adults discuss with children, it is surprising how knowledgeable adults feel across a variety of topics – from family finances to sex and drugs to their children’s Internet activity. Overall, mothers feel more knowledgeable discussing sex than do fathers. Not surprisingly, parents in some countries, for example, Brazil, feel far more knowledge- able discussing these sometimes sensitive topics than do parents in other countries, for example, China and Japan. In general, parents in most countries are more likely to feel knowledgeable discussing technology, drugs, or finances with children than they would talking about sex. It could be that parents are simply more uncomfortable, and not necessarily less knowledgeable, when it comes to discussing sex with their children. In countries where parents feel knowledgeable discussing finances, sex, and drugs, parents are also more likely to feel knowledgeable discussing their children’s Internet ac- tivity, specifically websites their children frequently visit and sharing personal information on the Internet. In some countries, parents actually feel more knowl- edgeable discussing sometimes sensitive topics such as finances, sex, and drugs than the websites their children are frequenting. This is true in Brazil (finances 72%, sex 75%, drugs 92%, vs. frequented websites 66%) and Swe- den (finance 80%, sex 64%, drugs 71%, vs. frequented websites 60%). Parents in the U.S. and Canada are most likely to report being knowledgeable about the Internet activities in which their children participate, namely, the websites their children visit and sharing personal information over the Internet. Importantly, these are the same countries in which parents report feeling their children spend “too much time” online. Thus, it may be that parents in these countries are more sensitive to their children’s usage of the Internet and therefore more vigilant and cautious about how their children’s time is spent online. Symantec Corporation ©2009 19
  22. 22. Two Schools of Thought valuable to children as reading a traditional book:as reading a traditional book: Regarding Impact on • Adults: UK (59%), Australia (59%), Canada and Education the U.S. (both 51%) • Parents: UK (63%), U.S. (62%), Australia (60%), The Internet as an avenue for children’s development Canada and Sweden (both 49%) of reading and writing skills receives varied evaluations across countries. A majority of adults (54%) and kids • Kids: Australia (74%), UK (71%), Canada (69%), (66%) feel that reading online is just as valuable for and Sweden (63%) children as reading a book. Adults and kids in countries Learning to Write: Hindered By Texts, Instant which emphasize the learning potential the Internet Messaging and Social Networking? provides, namely China and India, are most likely to agree with this statement. Notably, kids in China (88%), India • Overall 63% of adults and 50% of kids agree that (77%), Australia (74%) and the UK (71%) are the most online messaging and communication make it likely to find the value of online reading to be compa- harder for children today to learn to write well rable to the value of reading a book. In general, kids are • A majority of adults in France (82%), the U.S. more likely than adults or parents to agree that online (78%), Canada (73%), Australia (72%), and Brazil and offline reading are equally valuable. However, kids in (70%) agree that these types of online messaging France, Italy, and Japan are most likely to disagree that and communication make learning to write well online reading provides just as valuable an experience as harder for today’s children. Concern is shared by a smaller, but still significant majority of adults in the traditional books. UK (69%), India (68%), Italy (64%), Sweden, Germany, and Japan (all 58%) Although many adults and parents agree with kids that reading on the Internet is just as valuable as traditional • The only country in which less than half of adults agree that online messaging may impede learning book reading—and that the Internet may, in fact, make to write well is China (46%) – a country in which learning easier--they both report heightened concern the benefits of learning using the Internet are about the impact of texting, emailing, instant messaging heavily supported and posting information on social networks on the ability • In several countries, including Canada (78%), of children today to write well. Compared to all adults, the U.S. (77%), India (76%), France (76%), parents have more varied feelings about the impact of Australia (70%), Brazil (69%), Sweden (65%), and email, instant messaging, text messaging, and posting Italy (57%), the majority of parents agree that information on social networking websites or blogs on writing well is hindered by emailing, instant children’s ability to write well. In many countries, kids messaging and posting on social networking web sites or blogs echo parents’ and adults’ concern about the impact of these new communication tools on their ability to learn • Just one-third of parents in China (34%) agree that to write well. writing on the computer or text messaging may make it harder for children to learn to write well Online Reading • Parents in Germany, the UK, and Japan appear to be split on the role of these new technologies on Overall, 54% of online adults and 66% of online kids find the development of children’s writing skills: in reading on the Internet as valuable for children as reading Germany, 50% agree that it is a hindrance, while 50% disagree; in the UK, 51% agree, while 49% a book disagree; and, in Japan, 48% agree, while 52% disagree Large majorities of adults, parents, and kids in China and India find the Internet provides reading just as valuable as • A majority of kids in France (78%) and Brazil (73%), followed by Australia (63%), Canada (63%), Italy a book for children (59%), and Japan (55%), agree that these online messaging techniques and texting make learning to Additionally, in the following countries, at least about half write well more difficult for children of respondents agree that reading online is equally as • Further, about half of kids in the UK (53%), the U.S. Symantec Corporation ©2009 20
  23. 23. (52%), and Sweden (49%) also agree that online UK (61%), messaging and texting make learning to write well harder for children • Kids in China (84%), India (76%), Italy (75%), France (66%), Japan (61%), Germany (58%), the UK (55%), • Only in Germany (38%) and China (34%) do fewer and Australia (53%) than half of kids agree that online and text Parents and Kids Believe the Internet messaging may obstruct learning to write for Facilitates Learning children • Overall adults (78%) parents (82%) and kids (87%) Impact of Internet on Children’s Education agree that the Internet makes learning easier for children today Overall adults (78%) parents (82%) and kids(87%) agree • Reports that the Internet has made learning much that the Internet makes learning easier for children easier for children today are particularly high today and about one-third of adults (37%) agree that among kids in India (97%), China (96%), UK (95%), Australia (90%), Sweden (90%), Brazil (87%), U.S. the Internet makes it easier to educate children. Reports (86%), and Canada (86%), followed by Germany of this are particularly high among kids in India (97%), (78%), France and Italy (both 74%). China (96%), UK (95%), Australia (90%), Sweden (90%), Brazil (87%), U.S. (86%), and Canada (86%), followed • Though more than three in five kids in Japan feel the Internet makes learning easier, this is a by Germany (78%), France and Italy (both 74%). Despite lower proportion than kids in other countries. the finding that majorities of kids in all of these countries Interestingly, Japanese adults (16%), parents (12%) agree that the Internet makes learning easier, many kids and kids (27%) were among the most likely to still report that the time spent on the Internet is wasteful. report that “not enough” time is spent on the Though still a majority (62%), kids in Japan are less likely Internet by children. than those in other countries to agree that the Internet • A large majority of parents in China (94%), India facilitates learning. Interestingly, Japanese adults (16%), (88%), Brazil (88%), the U.S. (86%), Australia parents (12%), and kids (27%) were among the most (85%), the UK (84%), Germany (78%), Sweden likely to report that “not enough” time is spent online (78%), and Canada (77%) believe the Internet makes learning easier for children today. Despite the finding that majorities of kids in all of these • Parents are notably less enthusiastic about the countries think that the Internet makes learning easier, Internet as a means to facilitate learning in France many kids still report that the time spent on the Internet (72%), Italy (60%), and Japan (64%). is wasteful. Though still a majority (62%), kids in Japan • Most adults in India (89%), Australia (86%), the are less likely than those in other countries to agree that UK, China (both 85%), and Brazil (83%) agree that the Internet facilitates learning. Interestingly, Japanese the Internet has eased the learning process, adults, parents, and kids were among the most likely to followed by the U.S. (78%), Sweden (74%), and report that “not enough” time is spent online (16%). Canada (72%) Effect on Ease of Teaching Though opinions vary across the countries surveyed, parents and adults within each country seem to have • Overall parents (39%) and adults (37%) report that similar views about the impact of the Internet on their the Internet makes it easier for parents to teach children’s education. their children • Parents in India (53%), the U.S. (57%), Canada Countries where online users predominantly (55%), the UK (53%) and Australia (50%), followed believe children are mainly “learning valuable by those in Sweden (43%) and China (42% skills” online • Adults in India (62%), Australia (50%), the UK (48%), U.S., Canada (both 44%), China and Sweden • Adults in India (64%), Italy (60%), France (58%), (both 42%) China (57%), and Japan (53%) • Parents in France (70%), India (72%), Italy (67%), China (66%), Japan (63%), Germany (62%), and the Symantec Corporation ©2009 21
  24. 24. Interestingly, in several countries, parents and adults are most likely to report that the Internet makes no difference in the difficulty or ease they have educating their children • Parents in France (74%), Germany (73%), and Japan (68%) • Adults in France (68%), Germany (62%), and Japan (58%) In China, adults (47%) and parents (43%) are by far the most likely to report that the Internet actually makes educating their children harder. Symantec Corporation ©2009 22

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