By: Ryan Longstreth
 Classified by height above
ground and shape
 High clouds-Bases above
20,000 feet
 Middle Clouds-occupy
heights from 6,...
 Bases above 20,000
feet
 Prefix cirro is used to
name
 Cirrus
 Cirrostratus
 Cirrocumulus
 Thin and Wispy
 Feathery Appearance
 Have a net heating effect
 Could be sign of
approaching frontal
system
 Maybe r...
 Classified as a high cloud
 Thin, Ice crystal clouds
 Often form halos around
moon or sun
 Can be signs of a warm
fro...
 Classified as a high cloud
 Composed of ice crystals
 Usually in ripples or
waves as in the picture
 Very uncommon
 ...
Occupy heights
between 6,500 feet
and 20,000 feet
Prefix alto is used
in name
Altocumulus
Altostratus
 Made of Ice Crystals
 Can produce very
light precipitation
 Sun often shines
through them
 No halos are ever
produced
 Can be anywhere
from white to gray
 Usually appear as
layers
 Often precede a cold
front
 Can start the
development o...
Form below 6,500
feet
Stratus
Stratocumulus
Nimbostratus
 Flat and hazy
 Can be from dark gray
to nearly white
 May produce light
drizzle or snow
 Can cause fog
 Soft, Gray clouds
 Usually occur in
patches
 Most of the time no
precipitation
 Usually give fair
weather without muc...
 Low cloud that produces
rain
 Usually have thickness of
2000 meters
 Smooth, gray appearance
 Commonly found in the
m...
 Extend vertically
through more than
one height range
 Include Cumulus and
cumulonimbus
 Globular individual cloud
masses
 Cauliflower-like structure
 Dense
 Can extend up to 39,000 ft.
 Usually white
 Very tall and dense
 Often involved in
thunderstorms
 Heavy rainfall
 Tornadoes
 Result of Atmospheric
instability
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Classifying different types of clouds

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  • Here is a powerpoint showing how to classify different clouds.
  • Clouds are classified by their height above the ground and their shape. High clouds have bases above 20,000 ft. Middle Clouds have
  • Classifying different types of clouds

    1. 1. By: Ryan Longstreth
    2. 2.  Classified by height above ground and shape  High clouds-Bases above 20,000 feet  Middle Clouds-occupy heights from 6,500-20,000 feet  Low Clouds-form below 6,500 feet
    3. 3.  Bases above 20,000 feet  Prefix cirro is used to name  Cirrus  Cirrostratus  Cirrocumulus
    4. 4.  Thin and Wispy  Feathery Appearance  Have a net heating effect  Could be sign of approaching frontal system  Maybe remnants of a thunderstorm
    5. 5.  Classified as a high cloud  Thin, Ice crystal clouds  Often form halos around moon or sun  Can be signs of a warm front  Can signal precipitation
    6. 6.  Classified as a high cloud  Composed of ice crystals  Usually in ripples or waves as in the picture  Very uncommon  Usually turn into cirrostratus clouds
    7. 7. Occupy heights between 6,500 feet and 20,000 feet Prefix alto is used in name Altocumulus Altostratus
    8. 8.  Made of Ice Crystals  Can produce very light precipitation  Sun often shines through them  No halos are ever produced
    9. 9.  Can be anywhere from white to gray  Usually appear as layers  Often precede a cold front  Can start the development of a thunderstorm
    10. 10. Form below 6,500 feet Stratus Stratocumulus Nimbostratus
    11. 11.  Flat and hazy  Can be from dark gray to nearly white  May produce light drizzle or snow  Can cause fog
    12. 12.  Soft, Gray clouds  Usually occur in patches  Most of the time no precipitation  Usually give fair weather without much happening
    13. 13.  Low cloud that produces rain  Usually have thickness of 2000 meters  Smooth, gray appearance  Commonly found in the midlatitudes
    14. 14.  Extend vertically through more than one height range  Include Cumulus and cumulonimbus
    15. 15.  Globular individual cloud masses  Cauliflower-like structure  Dense  Can extend up to 39,000 ft.  Usually white
    16. 16.  Very tall and dense  Often involved in thunderstorms  Heavy rainfall  Tornadoes  Result of Atmospheric instability

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