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Nordic Centre for Internet & Society - An Introduction

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These are the slides for a talk given on 25 October 2016 at the University of Oslo.

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Nordic Centre for Internet & Society - An Introduction

  1. 1. Nordic Centre for Internet & Society A short intro into our work Christian Fieseler and Christoph Lutz Oslo, October 25th 2016
  2. 2. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 2 There are many stories about digital change • Statistic One: Uber is replacing X The Stories that we tell about the Digital Economy From Uber, to Airbnb, to facebook to google, we are fascinated by digital change and their figureheads – often not deliberating fully the context of these developments.
  3. 3. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 3 More than business models; social and cultural shifts Digital is more than another medium, in some ways it fundamentally changes how we behave and how we interact with each other.
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  5. 5. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 5 Our Research Agenda - Looking at work and organizing in the digital environment from three interrelated perspectives: Labor Specialization (Economies of Scope) • Technical Creativity • Complementarity • Resilience • Leading Digitally • Crowdsourcing • Sharing • Youth & Media • Crowd-Co-Working • Fairness • Diversity • Participation • Social Partnership
  6. 6. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 6 …our team consists currently of eight scholars (and growing)
  7. 7. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 7 Currently, we are researching the following areas Working in Virtual Teams The Effects of Self- Quantification Distinction and Social Status Markers The Sharing Economy Finding Meaningfulness in Digital Labor My Colleague the Robot - Human- Machine Interaction Fair Digital Labor Designing Civility into Online Interactions
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  11. 11. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 11 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Political Business Health Education Culture Online Participation Research Increasing Interest Lutz, Hoffmann, & Meckel (2014)
  12. 12. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 12 Online Participation Research (At least) Three Biases in the Literature 1. Political Bias Online participation research focuses heavily on political participation. 2. Positivity Bias Online participation research is positive and optimistic. 3. Activity Bias Online participation implies an active user.
  13. 13. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 13 A Typology of Online (Non-)Participation Involvement High: Participation Low: Non-Participation Agency Valence Active Passive Active Passive Positive Positive active participation Intentional constructive engagement Positive passive participation Unintentional constructive engagement Positive active non-participation Abstention as agency Positive passive non-participation Lack of necessity or advantage Negative Negative active participation Intentional destructive engagement Negative passive participation Involuntary undesired engagement Negative active non-participation Silencing, self- censoring Negative passive non-participation Exclusion
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  15. 15. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 15 More and more items of everyday life are shared through a fast growing number of internet platforms 15 SPORTS GEAR CARS APARTMENTS GARDENS AND TOOLS HOUSEHOLD ITEMS ELECTORNICS AND MEDIA
  16. 16. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 16 Online Sharing Platforms …owe their success not just to a shift in social technology, but also to a shift in attitudes. 16
  17. 17. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 17 Ps2Share Participation, Privacy and Power in the Sharing Economy • Investigating the sharing economy from a critical perspective. • Participation: Who is profiting from the sharing economy? Who is left out and why? • Privacy: What is the role of privacy concerns and trust when individuals share personal goods with a lot of value to them? • Power: Who defines the rules of the game? What role do algorithms, rankings and biases play in this context?
  18. 18. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 18 Privacy in the Sharing Economy Examples
  19. 19. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 19 Privacy in the Sharing Economy Qualitative Interviews about Airbnb In Sri Lanka we stayed at huge house of a lawyer and we had a whole floor for six people. In the beginning, he [the host] explained everything to us and then he became almost obtrusive and always wanted to talk with us and spend time with us. He came to our floor and just didn‘t want to leave anymore. And we just wanted to be left alone after the long journey. He was very strange and kept telling us how well he lives, that he is a lawyer, what connections he has and that he renovated the house. This was very inconvenient for us. (S.J., male, married) In Hamburg we had found handcuffs and such things next to the bed. I would have put that away if I had been the host but I guess each to their own. The stay wasn‘t worse because of that. It was never noisy or dirty. (C.S., 28 years old, female)
  20. 20. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 20 Privacy in the Sharing Economy Quantitative Survey about Airbnb – Simplified Model Trusting Beliefs Sharing Frequency Monetary Benefits Social- Hedonic Benefits Online Privacy Concerns + n.s. - Physical Privacy Concerns
  21. 21. 1st Advisory Board Meeting Page 21 thank you for your time Norwegian Business School (BI) Nordic Center for Internet & Society Nydalsvn. 37 / N-0442 Oslo bi.edu/cis @BI_NCIS

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