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You can do it, We can help.

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The librarian’s new role as course content curators. To address the rising cost of textbooks, we have established a framework for assisting faculty with course development. This session will prepare you to help faculty build courses that are rigorous as well as affordable using library resources and open access tools.

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You can do it, We can help.

  1. 1. “You Can Do It, We Can Help.” The Librarian’s New Role as Course Content Curator By CJ Ivory & Rebecca “Missy” Murphey
  2. 2. A survey conducted by the U.S. Public Interest Group in 2013 found that the average student spends about $1,200 a year on textbooks and materials. • For the average student at a 4-year public institution, this is ~14% of total annual costs • For the average community college student, it’s about 39%
  3. 3. MAKING SURE IT’S UP TO CODE
  4. 4. Florida responds with HB 7019 • Informs students of required and recommended textbooks before the start of classes • Requires our colleges and universities to adopt policies that make textbooks more affordable • Requires Board of Governors and the State Board of Education to annually study and make recommendations on how to make college more affordable
  5. 5. Florida Statutes 1004.085: Textbook and instructional materials affordability
  6. 6. Florida TA Suggestions State of Florida • For Educators – http://www.ohe.state.mn.us/pdf/ReducingTextbookCosts.pdf • For Students – http://www.fldoe.org/schools/higher-ed/fl-college- system/academic-student-affairs/textbook-affordability.stml University of Central Florida – http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/TeachingAndLearningResources/ Technology/eTextBook/index.php
  7. 7. Florida Virtual Campus • Florida state statute 1006.73 tasked the FLVC with promoting open access textbooks. • In response to this requirement FLVC created an Open Access Textbook and Education Resources Task Force.
  8. 8. Task Force Critical Findings • A majority of faculty reported getting help from others – 25.1% received help from librarians – 23.3% from instructional design staff • Recommendation – “Identify one librarian and one instructional design/technologies staff from each institution to pair up and serve as the official FLVC OER liaisons and campus OER points of contacts – may indeed be an important pillar in establishing a statewide OER community.”
  9. 9. Success stories: Librarian John & Professor Beck Medieval studies class • All materials out of copyright • Ideal to ‘create’ an open access text to save students purchasing book • John got reading list from professor • Was able to find digital copy for all but one item, a recent, copyrighted translation of a short text • In the interest of keeping the “textbook” free, Dr. Beck created his own translation to be used • CDL put into user-friendly ePub document
  10. 10. GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY Sometimes the stars align in your favor
  11. 11. Earlier CBA core: Cornerstone • Undergraduate advising was handled by the Office of Undergraduate Student Services • Cornerstone: Professional Skills for Business (GEB3031 & GEB 3031L) originally had a library research component, which was dropped when it became a service-learning class
  12. 12. New CBA core: Professional Development • Undergraduate Student Services replaced by Office of Professional Development • Cornerstone replaced by Professional Development Sequence (four 1-hr class) • GEB 3003 must be completed before student may select a major (based on interests/skills identified in class) The Professional Development Sequence: Students must also complete the professional development sequence that began with GEB 3003. The goal of the Professional Development curriculum is that students will research potential career opportunities and take steps to secure employment prior to graduation. a. GEB 3005 Career Search Strategies b. GEB 4223 Business Interviewing Techniques c. GEB 4004 Executing Your Career Plan
  13. 13. General Business program replaced with IB, designed to serve SMEs
  14. 14. CONTENT CURATOR CHECKLISTLessons Learned
  15. 15. Checklist Meeting Preparation 1st Meeting Post Meeting Follow-up Meetings Task: Identify Course/Program Learning Objectives Orient faculty to potential sources, Determine Instructional style, Course Delivery Format, & level of instruction. Develop Search Strategy & Compile Results Assessment Thingsto consider: • Course Syllabus • Program websites • Grading Rubrics • Lecture or Flipped Classroom • Face-to-face, online, mixed mode • Foundational, intermediate, advanced • Open Access/OER • Periodicals • eBooks • artifacts or evidence • Adequately covers content • rigorousness of material selected • accessibility of resources Deliverables: Attempt to obtain the course materials, learning, objectives or previous assignments prior to your meeting. This will allow you to take an inventory of potential sources and make the most efficient use of your meeting time. During the initial meeting you may want to give instructors an overview of resources so they understand the scale and scope of what is available. Based on analysis of course objectives and available resources compile a list of potential sources. After faculty has had an opportunity to review material, follow up to determine the effectiveness of selections.
  16. 16. Meeting Preparation 1st Meeting Post Meeting Follow-up Meetings Task: Orient faculty to potential sources, Determine Instructional style, Course Delivery Format, & level of instruction. Develop Search Strategy & Compile Results Assessment Thingsto consider: • Lecture or Flipped Classroom • Face-to-face, online, mixed mode • Foundational, intermediate, advanced • Open Access/OER • Periodicals • eBooks • artifacts or evidence • Adequately covers content • rigorousness of material selected • accessibility of resources Deliverables: During the initial meeting you may want to give instructors an overview of resources so they understand the scale and scope of what is available. Based on analysis of course objectives and available resources compile a list of potential sources. After faculty has had an opportunity to review material, follow up to determine the effectiveness of selections. Meeting Preparation Identify Course/Program Learning Objectives • Course Syllabus • Program websites • Grading Rubrics Obtain the course materials, learning objectives, or previous assignments prior to your meeting. This will allow you to take an inventory of potential sources and make the most efficient use of your meeting time.
  17. 17. Integrated Business Program Page
  18. 18. IB Course Descriptions
  19. 19. 1st Meeting Meeting Preparation Post Meeting Follow-up Meetings Task: Identify Course/Program Learning Objectives Develop Search Strategy & Compile Results Assessment Thingsto consider: • Course Syllabus • Program websites • Grading Rubrics • Open Access/OER • Periodicals • eBooks • artifacts or evidence • Adequately covers content • rigorousness of material selected • accessibility of resources Deliverables: Obtain the course materials, learning, objectives or previous assignments prior to your meeting. This will allow you to take an inventory of potential sources and make the most efficient use of your meeting time. Based on analysis of course objectives and available resources compile a list of potential sources. After faculty has had an opportunity to review material, follow up to determine the effectiveness of selections. 1st Meeting Introduce faculty to potential sources. Determine instructional style, course delivery format, & level of instruction. • Lecture or Flipped Classroom • Face-to-face, online, mixed mode • Foundational, intermediate, advanced During the initial meeting, give instructors an overview of resources so they understand the scale and scope of what is available.
  20. 20. Lesson Learned From The Trenches Case Study: Ask-A-Librarian is always the first to know • We received numerous calls about an ebook which was assigned for a course “that was also hosted as an eBook through the UCF site.” • With an assignment due the next day, professor: “I'm not really sure why only 5 students can read the eBook at a time.” Here’s where library education comes in handy: • The librarian spoke with acquisitions, paid a little extra, and had unlimited access turned on 2 days later • …a day too late for the assignment! Let faculty know it PAYS to plan ahead and check with your librarian.
  21. 21. Textbook Alternatives Guide • Consider developing pathfinders to direct faculty towards textbook alternatives. • From the OATER survey: “The need for an organized, course/subject specific portal to OER and library content was rated by 67.9% of survey responders as support that FLVC could provide centrally. This was the highest rated support activity”
  22. 22. UCF Textbook Alternatives Guide
  23. 23. There may be some resistance with your campus bookstore or other departments on campus. – “Barnes & Noble shall be responsible, at its cost and expense, for contacting in a timely manner all faculty members for their textbook and supply adoptions. University of Central Florida shall not be responsible for compiling, nor shall it maintain, a list of such adoptions.” – “In the course of providing the services contracted for in this contract, Barnes & Noble collects certain information from the faculty on its Course Book Information Request forms (COBIR Adoption Forms). Barnes & Noble also creates a computer database containing, among other things, course book adoption information. These forms and the database are Barnes & Noble's proprietary information, created at substantial cost and expense to Barnes & Noble and used in connection with its business, the retail sale of textbooks.” – “Should University of Central Florida require any information that may be contained within the forms or the database either for its educational purposes, or in order to comply with any public records request where no exemption is available (such as an exemption for commercial information), University of Central Florida understands that it will be responsible for collecting that information from the faculty.”
  24. 24. Post Meeting Meeting Preparation 1st Meeting Follow-up Meetings Task: Identify Course/Program Learning Objectives Orient faculty to potential sources, Determine Instructional style, Course Delivery Format, & level of instruction. Assessment Thingsto consider: • Course Syllabus • Program websites • Grading Rubrics • Lecture or Flipped Classroom • Face-to-face, online, mixed mode • Foundational, intermediate, advanced • Adequately covers content • rigorousness of material selected • accessibility of resources Deliverables: Attempt to obtain the course materials, learning, objectives or previous assignments prior to your meeting. This will allow you to take an inventory of potential sources and make the most efficient use of your meeting time. During the initial meeting you may want to give instructors an overview of resources so they understand the scale and scope of what is available. After faculty has had an opportunity to review material, follow up to determine the effectiveness of selections. Post Meeting Develop Search Strategy & Compile Results • Open Access/OER • Periodicals • eBooks • artifacts or evidence Based on analysis of course objectives and available resources compile a list of potential sources.
  25. 25. IB Faculty Meeting Resources
  26. 26. Follow-up Meetings Meeting Preparation 1st Meeting Post Meeting Task: Identify Course/Program Learning Objectives Orient faculty to potential sources, Determine Instructional style, Course Delivery Format, & level of instruction. Develop Search Strategy & Compile Results Thingsto consider: • Course Syllabus • Program websites • Grading Rubrics • Lecture or Flipped Classroom • Face-to-face, online, mixed mode • Foundational, intermediate, advanced • Open Access/OER • Periodicals • eBooks • artifacts or evidence Deliverables: Attempt to obtain the course materials, learning, objectives or previous assignments prior to your meeting. This will allow you to take an inventory of potential sources and make the most efficient use of your meeting time. During the initial meeting you may want to give instructors an overview of resources so they understand the scale and scope of what is available. Based on analysis of course objectives and available resources compile a list of potential sources. Follow-up Meetings Assessment • Adequately covers content • rigorousness of material selected • accessibility of resources After faculty has had an opportunity to review material, follow up to determine the effectiveness of selections.
  27. 27. Lesson Learned From The Trenches Case Study: “then just any mechanical engineering textbook” • Professor gave students option of spending money on the paper textbook, or saving money by getting the e- text • He DID warn them that tests would be open-book, and that those who had purchased the e-book would NOT be allowed to bring it to the tests. However, they could bring any other textbook. • The library doesn’t own enough current textbooks to serve every ME student. Those who bought the e-text are disadvantaged by testing with a 30-year old textbook, compared to those with the new edition.
  28. 28. EVALUATIONWhat needs improvement
  29. 29. DISCOVERY INTERVIEWS Or, why we didn’t just send out a survey, and why we probably won’t in the future.
  30. 30. I – Corps! (Because apparently Missy felt like she didn’t have enough going on.) Two-day workshop that advertised great networking potential, which would be perfect for my PTRC clients.
  31. 31. Search for the Right Business Model Customer Discovery Customer Validation Customer Creation Company BuildingS SS Pivot Search Execute The Lean Start-up Approach Before You Spend Money on Execution Where we used to start a new businessWhere we start with LS Version 8/12/16
  32. 32. Crucial Customer Data – Question Everything GAINs Benefits the customer expects • Which savings would make your customer happy? • What do customers dream about? • How do current solutions delight your customer? • What would make your customer’s job or life easier? • What positive social consequences do they desire? • What would increase the likelihood of adopting a solution? • What would go beyond their expectations? PAINs Undesired costs, situations, risks, negative emotions • What do your customers find too costly? • How are current solutions underperforming? • What are their main difficulties and challenges? • What’s keeping them awake at night? • What barriers are keeping customers from adopting? • What makes your customers feel bad? • What risks do customers fear? Discovery Finds the Undesired Costs, Situations, Risks or Emotions that create PAINS and Opportunities That Lead to GAINs. Time is Precious Make sure you Discover Your Highest Risk Topics!!
  33. 33. Discovery interviews: creating the 1st script Create one card for each hypothesis you want to verify with the customer (the questions that make up your script will be pulled from these hypotheses) Define the Pains and Gains Your Customers Experience? What Pains are they facing in their daily jobs? How might you solve those Pains? What Gains might they be missing out on? What does your solution do to create beneficial Gains?
  34. 34. I-Corps Bootcamp – Winter Springs 8/17/16 Key Performance Indicators for a Successful Workshop** • Define Initial Customer Segments • Define Initial Customer Jobs Relevant to Your Idea or Solution • Create a Prioritized Customer Interview Script • Create List of 10 Customers to Interview (include Company, Names & Positions) • Conduct at Least 5 Customer Discovery Interviews (include Company, Names & Positions) • Document Customer Pains/Gains for at Least 5 Customers • Conduct at Least 1 Mentor Engagement • Assess Whether You Believe Your are Achieving Customer Validation for Your Idea • Assess whether You Would Continue to Invest in Your Idea or Pivot • Provide a Clear & Concise Presentation Detailing Your Action & Results • Extra Credit of 1% for Each Customer Interviewed, Beyond the Initial 5 Version 8/12/16 **All 8 Items will be graded based on the Day-2 In-class Presentation - each Item is Worth 10%
  35. 35. So…our survey quickly turned into an interview!
  36. 36. Our Survey Results… • 5 of 5 faculty members experienced difficulty finding appropriate resources for their course. • 5 of 5 consulted a librarian to help find content for their courses. • 5 of 5 used more than one library service while creating content or assignments for their course. • 5 of 5 said that integrating OER resources into their courses was more time intensive
  37. 37. Jim Gilkeson “Everybody’s based on Google and Ford and Pepsi and IBM’s rebound and repurposing and how Mark Zuckerberg claw his way to the top with Facebook, you know, the big companies get all the attention, people don’t tend to build cases about ‘here’s mom and pop restaurant, here’s auto body shop that somebody started, you know…Or even the landscaping guy who’s got 5 crews working in one county would be fine for us, anything that shows… the vast majority of firms look like that, but the cases all look like everybody’s got an HR department and a marketing department and an accounting department, and for our purposes, that sort of defeats what we’re trying to do.” “We’re telling students we’re all about a small to medium size firm focus, so what I’VE been doing is literally writing cases.” Integrated Business Degree
  38. 38. Gordon Henry Human Resources “I mean if we were to use traditional textbooks for our courses, we would end up supplementing them so much anyway …so the pros of doing everything yourself obviously is: much more customized for your student needs, at much less expense, and it’s easily updatable.”
  39. 39. Leslie Connell Foundations of Integrated Business I prefer the non-open source. To teach, from my perspective. I would try not to use them in the future because they’re so outrageously expensive, it doesn’t seem realistic. The open source don’t seem to have enough depth, they are very surface level, or higher level, there’s not enough of the detail, and that’s okay I guess, if you’re going to be able to lecture, and give detail in a classroom that’s lecture-driven but our IB program we’re not lecturing so I need them to get the detail, some other way, that’s the drawback to the etext.
  40. 40. Carlos Valdez Contemporary Marketing Prefer this 100%, I hope never to go back to traditional books! They learn lesson and get much much better. And the reason for that is because, for example I can built the course, base it on all the things that really the student needs. Sometimes with traditional they’ll always change the chapters, the order of the chapters, or eliminate some chapters, that they, the student, doesn’t need it.
  41. 41. Christopher Leo Applied Business Technologies • I’ll tell you this: when I was teaching the capstone course, when the lecturer would assign an ebook, none of my students got it. HardlyANYof them got it. And it doesn’t make any sense, cause they’re like, $20, so it’s not an issue of price. But to be fair, when we had a hard textbook, not a lot of students would get the textbook, either. But it SEEMED, and maybe this is just my perspective I don’t have any data to back this up, seemed students were less likely to buy an ebook than they were an actual textbook, and talk ing to students, and this is weird, think about this generation, all “e-this” and “i-that”, right? They’re like “Nooo, I read from a screen all day long and the last thing I want to do is go home and read from another screen, I… I almost want an actual book.” I’m just likeWHOAM I TALKING TO?
  42. 42. I think I prefer what I’m doing now in my current course. It requires *I* do a lot more work, but at least I’m getting as current information as I’m able to find, that doesn’t mean most current, just most current that I’m able to find. It saves the student the expense of purchasing a very expensive textbook, and I know some of them can’t afford it so they don’t buy ‘em. So it seems to level the playing field for students that are really interested, to avoid the use of the textbook and use the electronic resources. If you COULD use a traditional textbook for your IB class, would you? No. Unless I wrote it. Frank Tamberelli Small Business Finance
  43. 43. DISCOVERING NEW CLASSES & PROGRAMS Official, unofficial, new and/or unconventional
  44. 44. Undergraduate Programs Undergraduate Policy and Curriculum Committee (UPCC) • To study, review, and provide recommendations on undergraduate policies, instruction, and standards • To review and make recommendations on all proposals for planning or implementation of new undergraduate degree programs, minors, and elimination of existing programs Undergraduate Course Review Committee (UCRC) • Has the duty to study, review, and provide recommendations on all undergraduate course additions, revisions, deletions, and special topics course requests. • Characteristics of new and revised regular and special topics courses that are reviewed include title, description, credit hours, syllabus, level, and grading scheme
  45. 45. Graduate programs Graduate Curriculum Committee • Reviews changes to existing graduate programs (such as hours, thesis/non- thesis options) • Reviews new tracks or options to existing graduate programs • Reviews new certificate programs • Reviews all requests for additions, revisions, and deletions of graduate and special topic courses Program Review and Awards Committee • To review graduate programs as part of the program review cycle, identify factors that promote quality in graduate programs, and update faculty status • To review proposals of new graduate programs and deletion of existing programs that will be submitted to this committee
  46. 46. Before 2013: Collection development librarians • Each librarian had collection development duties for one or more departments • Communication was mostly through a single “library liaison” appointed by the department • Instruction, research consultations, scholarly communication distributed among librarians
  47. 47. 2013-present: Subject Librarian Model • Outreach to all faculty (chairs, program directors, adjuncts, etc.) • Assist with program reviews • Assist with new program proposals • Attend faculty/department meetings • Encouraged to perform curriculum mapping Librarian becomes “the face of the library” for their departments
  48. 48. Other sneaky librarian ways … • Outreach librarian gets a list of the new faculty each year and distributes it to the subject librarians – Either they’re teaching a class for the first time and won’t have textbook loyalties, or they were hired for a new or changed program • Keep in touch with librarians at your regional/branch campuses: they have very loyal tight-knit faculty who may approach them first. • Watch the job ads for your university and news from your departments’ news feeds • Talk to faculty frequently, ask if anything new happened in the last faculty meeting, if they’re teaching anything new, if they turned in their textbook preferences yet…
  49. 49. References Nicole Allen, Charles Lyons, and Bob Nardini, “From Course Reserves . . . to Course Reversed? The Library’s Changing Role in Providing Textbook Content” (2014). Proceedings of the Charleston Library Conference. http://dx.doi.org/10.5703/1288284315617 Marilyn Billings, William M. Cross, Brendan O’Connell, Gregory Raschke, and Charlotte Roh, “Libraries Leading the Way on the Textbook Problem” (2014). Proceedings of the Charleston Library Conference. http://dx.doi.org/10.5703/1288284315631 Goldie Blumenstyk, “As Free Textbooks Go Mainstream, Advocate Says Colleges Should Do More to Support Them” (2016). The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://www.chronicle.com/article/As-Free-Textbooks-Go/237082
  50. 50. References Boyoung Chae and Mark Jenkins, “A Qualitative Investigation of Faculty Open Educational Resource Usage in the Washington Community and Technical College System: Models for Support and Implementation” (2015). Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4eZdZMtpULyZC1NRHMzOEhRRzg/view The OATER Task Force, “An Action Plan for Building a Statewide Infrastructure to Support OER in Florida’s Public Institutions of Higher Education” (2016). Florida Library Virtual Campus. https://libraries.flvc.org/documents/181844/182705/The+Final+Report+of+the+Open+Access+Textbook+ and+Educational+Resources+(OATER)+Task+Force/649ecbf1-bb9d-4c58-b26c-b5c09a9f4719 S.C. Sutton and F. A. Chadwell, “Open Textbooks at Oregon State University: A Case Study of New Opportunities for Academic Libraries and University Presses” (2014). Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication 2(4). http://jlsc-pub.org/articles/abstract/10.7710/2162-3309.1174/
  51. 51. Links • Integrated Business Interview script: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeJD_dky_9h- FY2e9AaaasraKZ5-H4SafRu1w4An4uX1YMu2Q/viewform About the Lean Startup model, re: customer interviews • The Startup Owner’s Manual by Steve Blank and Bob Dorf http://amzn.to/29rwLno • Business Model Generation by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur http://amzn.to/29yj2ao • Talking to Humans by Giff Constable (available for free online at http://bit.ly/1KvlizG) • The Value Proposition Canvas, available via Strategyzer https://strategyzer.com/canvas/value-proposition- canvas/?url=canvas/vpc/
  52. 52. Contact Us CJ Ivory Business Librarian 407-823-3604 CJ@ucf.edu https://www.linkedin.com/in/c j-ivory-105274a Missy Murphey Patents Librarian 407- 823-5308 Rebecca.Murphey@ucf.edu

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