Media Innovations for Individual, Community and Higher Education

429 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
429
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
79
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Media Innovations for Individual, Community and Higher Education

  1. 1. Media Ecosystem Innovations A macro and micro view of individual, higher education and community tools for providing fresh news and information. Dr. Michelle Ferrier Scripps College of Communication, Ohio University ferrierm@ohio.edu; @mediaghosts
  2. 2. • Associate Dean for Innovation | Associate Professor Scripps College of Communication, Ohio University, OH; ferrierm@ohio.edu; Twitter: @mediaghosts • Vice President, Journalism That Matters Founder, Create or Die Startup Gatherings • Founder, LocallyGrownNews.com info@locallygrownnews.com; Twitter: @localize_nc • Mother of Google Maps Educator Entrepreneur Mentor Scholar New Media Innovator Dr. Michelle Ferrier
  3. 3.  Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Elon University, @mediaghosts MyWorldView
  4. 4. Our Agenda  1. Digital Story Quilt: Creating identity and community online using quilters’ tactics.  2. Media Deserts Project: Way of "seeing" that provides high-level view of the ecosystem.  3. Media Entrepreneurship: Creating pathways to innovation inside and outside the classroom.  4. Digital Scholarship: Representing nonlinear narratives in a nontraditional format. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  5. 5. Four strategic questions that frame the new challenges and opportunities for media organizations. Source: The Big Thaw: Charting a Future for Journalism, Deifell, 2009.
  6. 6. The Digital Story Quilt  Alan Kay, an interface designer, poses the question: “What kind of thinker would you become if you grew up with an active simulator connected, not just to one point of view, but to all the points of view of the ages represented so that they could be dynamically tried out and compared?” Alan Kay,“User Interface: A Personal View,” The Art of Human-Computer Interface Design, 1990.
  7. 7. Practice:The Quilters’ Space  Reflexive, poetic, interpretive practice  Kind of rootedness  Quilts communicate in an intimate fashion across generations  Offers tactics for agency
  8. 8. Practice:The Quilters’ Space  Through quilt text(iles), women used their constraints n – to create a way of knowing that expanded their domestic rhetoric into a public realm.  Contrary to patriarchal rhetorical styles, this femmage or female collage uses fragments to work in a conductive fashion – a hyperrhetorical movement.
  9. 9. The Digital Story Quilt Using six themes of family, nature, ancestry, discipline, community and entertainment, users select multimedia content for each theme.
  10. 10. Practice:The Quilters’ Space  Fragmentation: Tearing apart that which is seemingly whole into pieces to create place of liminality (in between).  Condensation: Reduction of ideas to icons or symbolic narratives; at level of family unit.  Juxtaposition: Destabilizing, relational nature of narratives, images display complexities.  Improvisation: Kairos; the right suggestion at the right time; yielding to the creative process.  Endurance: Persistence over time.
  11. 11. The Digital Story Quilt Users then search the interface using a variety of search tools. They create a visual quilt top that may be manipulated or “read” to reveal the multiple dimensions of each patch.
  12. 12. The Digital Story Quilt
  13. 13. Postfeminist Research, HypertextTheory  Participatory Action: Everyone can speak for themselves and constitute their own subject position.  Dismantling Genres: Shift distinctions between “received categories” so they may be questioned and redefined.  Communal Authorship: Politics of hypertext that is polyvocal that overturns dominant mythology of solitary author.  Recombinant Materials: Creative appropriation of symbology of a culture. Diane Greco, “Hypertext with Consequences: Recovering a Politics of Hypertext,” ACM, 1996.
  14. 14. Media Deserts Project  Using GIS tools, we map “media deserts” -- places where fresh news and information is lacking.  Modeled after the USDA Food Access Locator Map Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  15. 15. What is a “Media Desert”? Working Definition  A media desert is a geographic area that is lacking fresh news and information.  This condition may be as a result of a lack of content, access, language barriers and other issues. Framework of Analysis  I use Lawrence Lessig’s concept of communications architecture:  CODE: Language, spoken or written or computer languages  CONTENT: News, information, images  CONDUIT: Newspapers, radio, mobile. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Elon University, @mediaghosts
  16. 16. Newspaper Layoffs and Buyouts Year  2007  2008  2009  2010 Layoffs and Buyouts  2,256+ (partial data)  15,992+  14,783+  2,828+ 120+ newspapers Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts More than 120 newspapers have ceased operation in the United States since 2008.
  17. 17. Mapping Newspaper Changes Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  18. 18. Methodology Data Sets  Audit Bureau of Circulation (Alliance for Audited Media) total paid circulation data for daily newspapers in North Carolina from 2007 and 2010/2011.  2000 census data by zip code. Technologies  Excel spreadsheets  Google Maps  ArcGIS proprietary software Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  19. 19. Methodology  Daily Dispatch  Alamance News  Times-News  Winston-Salem Journal  Mount Airy News  News & Record  High Point Enterprise  Sanford Herald  Charlotte Observer  Fayetteville Observer  Salisbury Post  Danville Register & Bee  News & Observer  Asheville Citizen-Times  Richmond County Daily Journal  Wilmington Star-News Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  20. 20. Overlapping service areas for 12 newspapers in NC. Three newspapers in our pilot did not have ABC data for multiple years. Mapping Circulation Data Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  21. 21. Average Annual Change in Circulation -4% 0% 4% RQ1: Newspaper Circulation Change 2007 to 2011 Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  22. 22. Results Household Income  Statistical analysis using Ordinary Least Squares Regression suggests a very weak positive relationship between Median Household Income and Change in Circulation (R2 = 0.16, p < 0.1). A $10,000 decrease in Median Household Income results in a %0.02 drop in Circulation. Education Attainment  Similarly, the data suggest a very weak positive relationship between the % of people with At Least Some College and Change in Circulation (R2 = 0.12, p < 0.05). A 10% reduction in the number of people with some college results in a %0.08 drop in Circulation. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  23. 23. Average Annual Change in Circulation -4% 0% 4% % of population with at least some college 0% 38% 90%
  24. 24. Average Annual Change in Circulation -4% 0% 4% Median Household Income $0 $35,000 $100,000
  25. 25. Greensboro News & Record  Service area for the Greensboro News & Record, according to their 2014 media kit. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  26. 26. Results for News & Record  This region shows erosion around the perimeter of its service area. However, in the core of Guilford County, we also see erosion of the circulation. The newspaper lost many subscribers right in their back yard. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts Average Annual Change in Daily Edition Circulation -4% 0% 4%
  27. 27. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts The interface design for the public website includes pinpoints of the location of daily newspapers with dot size representing the daily circulation.
  28. 28. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts After users see the pinpoint data, they can click on a state and see the circulation change rendered by zip code. Users can also compare the circulation on demographic factors.
  29. 29. Hyperlocal Online News Layer Quantitative Analysis  We examined the reach by zip code of 132 hyperlocal online news sites.  We collected demographics from 2010 census data and from site-specific demographics as available on gender, education, HHI, and ethnicity. Qualitative Analysis  We collected “home page” screen grabs of each of the 132 sites for 14 days.  Our content analysis focused on story coverage and on a visual analysis of the sites. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  30. 30. The student work is collected into a wiki, where we can aggregate the content analysis for each hyperlocal online news site. Future work will incorporate geographic reach into the media deserts map. Hyperlocal Online News Layer Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University, @mediaghosts
  31. 31. Four strategic questions that frame the new challenges and opportunities for media organizations. Source: The Big Thaw: Charting a Future for Journalism, Deifell, 2009.
  32. 32. 5 Concrete Steps for Media Innovation  Create more venues like Comcast’s DreamIt Ventures and UNITY’s NewU that increase the odds that diverse people and projects can pitch and be heard. As part of this mix, we need incubators that don’t require relocation to Silicon Valley or Boulder, Colorado. A “Bloom where you’re planted” model would bring together training and talent in a geographic space  Develop education and training for the hundreds of potential businesses that wither at the doorways to incubators and pitch sessions. These projects could be successful if provided with nurturing, talent, and access to funds. We need a distributed model, probably online and in physical space, that will help give entrepreneurs just-in-time access to the information and people that can help vet and nurture new ideas.
  33. 33. 5 Concrete Steps for Media Innovation  Create a talent network so that media entrepreneurs can find and build a talented team that has a higher likelihood of success. Content ideas rarely get funded unless they have a strong technology play. Many ideas flounder because of the lack of a tech team early on in the process of product development.  Create a microfund to support application fees and travel fees for potential entrepreneurs to attend and perhaps pitch at the other startup weekends and venues around the country. These small loans, probably of a couple of hundred dollars, will help in identifying media entrepreneurs in need of just the services a robust network can provide.  Create a media corps of new and tested hyperlocal online news publishers to serve underserved and underrepresented communities. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Elon University, @mediaghosts
  34. 34. OHIO University Pathways to Innovation  Scripps Innovation Challenge: University-wide student media entrepreneurship competition.  Mobile Module: Two-week module taught by industry expert.  Game Research and Immersive Design Lab: Pre-incubation space for game development teams.  Digital Media Incubator: Early-stage investment in student/graduate companies. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Elon University, @mediaghosts
  35. 35. Workshop Question #1  What skills and knowledge do non-business students need to know and be able to do?
  36. 36. Workshop Question #2  What structures within the university can facilitate the acquisition of these skills/knowledge?
  37. 37. Workshop Question #3  How do students demonstrate their learnings in a “published” format?
  38. 38.  Associate Dean for Innovation, Research/Creative Activity and Graduate Studies  Scripps College of Communication Ohio University  ferrierm@ohio.edu  @mediaghosts  Michelleferrier.wordpress.com Dr. Michelle Ferrier

×