Lisa SpiroMay 14, 2013David Kernohan
“Although MOOCs start off with huge numbers ofenrolled participants, a small percentage do theassignments, and an even sma...
 1997: genesis of MERLOT 1999: Connexions launches 2001: MIT’s OpenCourseWare Initiative announced 2007: David Wiley o...
cMOOCs (Connectivist) Examples: ds106,cck11 Key elements: More participant-driven More organic Participantsaggregate,...
giulia.forsythe
http://chronicle.com/article/As-MOOC-Debate-Simmers-at-San/139147/http://chronicle.com/article/Duke-Us-Undergraduate/13889...
 Fear that MOOCs are at odds with residential education Belief that MOOCs are elitist Critique of MOOC pedagogy Replic...
 Over 80% have a B.A. or higher (5.4% havePhDs) Global group of students:NorthAmerica35%Europe28%Asia21%S.America9%Afric...
Katy JordanDuke Bioelectricty Great, demanding HCI course
 Not cMOOCs Even xMOOCs offer: Micro-lectures, which you can view repeatedly Mid-lecture quizzes to test comprehension...
“How do we infuse the massive open online spacewith a responsive, collaborative and discussion-based learning experience—t...
 Integrating MOOCs into on-campus learning Using MOOCs as “super-textbooks” Extending course offerings throughindepende...
San Jose State University’s experiment withblended course using edX’s "Circuits &Electronics" Students worked w/ edX mate...
 Dr. Scott Rixner (Rice, “An Introduction to InteractiveProgramming in Python) Students worked through Coursera material...
http://www.swarthmore.edu/admissions-and-aid/the-global-reach-of-the-liberal-arts.xml
"generative scholarship": “It is scholarshipbuilt to generate, as it is used, newquestions, evidence, conclusions, andaudi...
“The problem with MOOC’s is that they arelargely one-way delivery…. they don’t appear tome to be grappling with the real q...
 Human Evolution: Past and Future “With a worldwide group of thousands ofstudents, well be giving people the opportunity...
 Develop a deeper understanding of theimplications of MOOCs for learning and liberaleducation Embrace true openness Emp...
Making Sense of MOOCs from a Liberal Arts Perspective
Making Sense of MOOCs from a Liberal Arts Perspective
Making Sense of MOOCs from a Liberal Arts Perspective
Making Sense of MOOCs from a Liberal Arts Perspective
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Making Sense of MOOCs from a Liberal Arts Perspective

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Presentation on MOOCs and liberal education for Trinity College's Spring Institute on Teaching and Technology (SITT) 2013, http://commons.trincoll.edu/itec/event-may-2013/

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  • CC08: Stephen Downes & George Siemens:
  • http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/12/06/wellesley-and-wesleyan-hope-moocs-will-inform-campus-based-teaching
  • -harvest/
  • Making Sense of MOOCs from a Liberal Arts Perspective

    1. 1. Lisa SpiroMay 14, 2013David Kernohan
    2. 2. “Although MOOCs start off with huge numbers ofenrolled participants, a small percentage do theassignments, and an even smaller percentage finish.The retention rate at the highly selective liberal artsschools, by any measure, is very high. Residentialliberal arts education depends on the ongoinginteraction of students with one another and withfaculty. MOOCs encourage interaction of a differentsort: through social media and chat rooms.”Michael Roth, Pres. of Wesleyan“Why a Liberal Arts School Has Joined Coursera”[emphasis added]
    3. 3.  1997: genesis of MERLOT 1999: Connexions launches 2001: MIT’s OpenCourseWare Initiative announced 2007: David Wiley offers Introduction to OpenEducation 2008: “MOOC” coined (with help from BryanAlexander); 1st MOOC, Connectivism andConnective Knowledge (CCK08), offered 2011: Stanford offers 3 open courses [snowballaccelerates]
    4. 4. cMOOCs (Connectivist) Examples: ds106,cck11 Key elements: More participant-driven More organic Participantsaggregate, remix,repurpose, and feedforward contentxMOOCs Examples: Coursera,edX Key elements: Guided by the instructor More linear Participants learn fromvideo + quizzes,exercises, forums,projects &chttp://www.flickr.com/photos/26036894@N03/4264798634
    5. 5. giulia.forsythe
    6. 6. http://chronicle.com/article/As-MOOC-Debate-Simmers-at-San/139147/http://chronicle.com/article/Duke-Us-Undergraduate/138895/http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/03/education/san-jose-state-philosophy-dept-criticizes-online-courses.htmlhttp://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/04/19/despite-courtship-amherst-decides-shy-away-star-mooc-provider
    7. 7.  Fear that MOOCs are at odds with residential education Belief that MOOCs are elitist Critique of MOOC pedagogy Replicates the large lecture Plagued by high drop-out rates Requires very motivated students Sense of threats to higher education Increasing inequality Reducing diversity of courses Risk of weakening the value of the college “brand” Undermining faculty autonomy & faculty positions Risks of privatization of higher ed
    8. 8.  Over 80% have a B.A. or higher (5.4% havePhDs) Global group of students:NorthAmerica35%Europe28%Asia21%S.America9%Africa4%Oceania3%Percentage
    9. 9. Katy JordanDuke Bioelectricty Great, demanding HCI course
    10. 10.  Not cMOOCs Even xMOOCs offer: Micro-lectures, which you can view repeatedly Mid-lecture quizzes to test comprehension Exercises Online forums, sometimes w/ active participation ofinstructor They may also offer: Projects, including group projects Study groups, typically student-initiated Peer assessments Peer to peer learningSee Derek Bruff, “Not Your Father’s MOOCs”
    11. 11. “How do we infuse the massive open online spacewith a responsive, collaborative and discussion-based learning experience—the kind of educationthat is truly transformative?”(Andrew Shennan, provost & dean ofWellesley College)
    12. 12.  Integrating MOOCs into on-campus learning Using MOOCs as “super-textbooks” Extending course offerings throughindependent study and mentored learning Teaching “wrapper” courses that leverageMOOCs Practicing the “distributed flip” Providing multi-campus classes Facilitating “generative scholarship”
    13. 13. San Jose State University’s experiment withblended course using edX’s "Circuits &Electronics" Students worked w/ edX materials at home & cameto class 2x/week to do group work & ask questions 90% of students in blended course passed vs. 59%in “regular” course Instructor reported greater student engagement &confidence Concerns that this model will diminish facultyautonomy & threaten learning
    14. 14.  Dr. Scott Rixner (Rice, “An Introduction to InteractiveProgramming in Python) Students worked through Coursera material beforeclass & were thus more prepared Time freed up for projects, discussion “I will never lecture in a classroom again” Dr. Phillip Zelikow (UVA, “The Modern World”) Flipped his classroom: discussion sessions 1day/week, “history lab” w/ primary documents theother Zelikow: “I’ve been teaching courses like this for about20 years now.. . This is the most powerful design.”
    15. 15. http://www.swarthmore.edu/admissions-and-aid/the-global-reach-of-the-liberal-arts.xml
    16. 16. "generative scholarship": “It is scholarshipbuilt to generate, as it is used, newquestions, evidence, conclusions, andaudiences.”
    17. 17. “The problem with MOOC’s is that they arelargely one-way delivery…. they don’t appear tome to be grappling with the real questions, thehard questions, about how can we usetechnology like this to better serve our students.We need more models for MOOC’s, not fewer.And we need ones that particularly advance thehumanities.” (WillThomas)
    18. 18.  Human Evolution: Past and Future “With a worldwide group of thousands ofstudents, well be giving people the opportunity toparticipate in some real research.” (John Hawks)
    19. 19.  Develop a deeper understanding of theimplications of MOOCs for learning and liberaleducation Embrace true openness Employ Creative Commons licenses to allowreuse Bring learning into the open Allow customization and contributions Enable instructors to access learning data fortheir students

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