Week 6 3 Writing For The Web

444 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
444
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Week 6 3 Writing For The Web

  1. 1. Writing for the web<br />Gathering and PreparingText, Numbers and Images<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  2. 2. Writing for the Web<br />Writing for print and writing for the Web require different styles<br />Web readers expectations:<br />They are often distracted by what’s going on around them<br />The screen is low-resolution<br />They expect fast, convenient, interactive communication <br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  3. 3. Web Writing Tips<br />Keep it short, essentials only<br />Pyramid structure<br />Summarize the story in the 1st paragraph<br />Include: who, what, when, where, why, how<br />Later paragraphs provide more details<br />If they’re interested they’ll keep reading<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  4. 4. Web Writing Tips<br />Use subheads<br />Helps readers find information more quickly<br />Subheads should be short and sweet<br />Use subheadings that describe the content<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  5. 5. Writing for the Web<br />Use bullets to express separate but parallel ideas or examples<br />Omit transitional phrases<br />Conserves space<br />Faster reading<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  6. 6. Writing for the Web<br />Provide links to relevant materials not essential to your immediate purpose<br />Link to:<br />Examples<br />Illustrations<br />Background material<br />Original sources<br />Corporate Web sites<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  7. 7. Writing for the Web<br />Think about the Gettysburg Address<br />Was it written for the Web?<br />No, so how could you portray it over the web<br />Evaluate the websites on the following slide<br />What do you think of how they’ve designed their sites and what is the effectiveness of the presentation of the Address?<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  8. 8. Writing for the Web<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />http://history.eserver.org/gettysburg-address.txt<br />http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gettysburgaddress.htm<br />http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=36<br />http://bensguide.gpo.gov/9-12/documents/gettysburg/about.html<br />
  9. 9. Writing for the Web<br />Sites on the Web aren’t books, newspapers or magazine you read on a screen<br />Use tools and methods appropriate to your site.<br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />
  10. 10. Writing for the Web<br />Once text files have been created, save them as:<br />.txt or .html files<br />Word processing files offer the opportunity to save in either format<br />Avoid using Save As .html in Word<br />Adds a lot of unnecessary code to the documents.<br />Save as .txt and then bring into a web design program <br />Linda C. Morosko, 2008 The Web Wizard’s Guide to Web Design, James G. Lengel<br />

×