Website
http://goo.gl/7YHs8J
Reality

• New Research on the brain
• No longer College Prep
• Now 21st Century Workforce Prep
Why
•Need to know how to deal with
difficulties, how to struggle and
how to be confused.
•The Growth mindset knows
how to capi...
Experience
Comprehension
Elaboration
Application/intention
• Experience provides the new data that will be
used to construct new knowledge.
Comprehension provides the content
struct...
The more ways something is
learned, the more memory
pathways are built.
Effective teaching uses strategies
to help student...
Prediction
Sketch the abstract
Experiential learning
Relational memory
Patterns
Graphic organizers
Personal meaning
Cross-...
To take advantage of their engaged state of
mind, students should have the opportunities to
interact with the information ...
Amygdala safe area
Formative assessment
Rubrics
Variety of assessment modalities
Metacognition
Seven Survival Skills for the 21st
Century
• Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
• Collaboration Across Networks and Lea...
21st Century Skills
Critical thinking and problem solving
Communications, information and media literacy
Collaboration, te...
Innovation

• There are essentially two very different
kinds of innovation in both the for-profit
and nonprofit arenas: in...
Innovation
•

“If we are

serious about preparing
students to be innovators, we have
some hard work ahead. Getting
student...
World Class Learners by Yong Zhao
• Lady Gaga vs. Sausage
Making
• Empires die when they
homogenize
High Tech High
Habits of Mind

1. To think about
significance
2. Perspective: what is
the point of view
3. Evidence: how d...
Horizon Report 2010
The perceived value of innovation and creativity
is increasing. Innovation is valued at the highest
le...
Thom Markham “The 21st Century Dilemma”
It’s not the ‘A’ category—that’s Mastery or
Commended or a similar high-ranking in...
Questions for Reflection
• In our classrooms, how are we leveraging
what we know about how children learn and
how their br...
Digital and Media Literacy
Existing paradigms in technology education must be shifted towards a focus
on critical thinking...
• Develop proficiency with the tools of technology
• Build relationships with others to pose and solve
problems collaborat...
• Develop proficiency with the tools of technology
• Students in the 21st century should have experience with and develop
...
•
•

Design and share information for global communities that have a variety of
purposes
Students in the 21st century must...
Non-Negotiables
•
•
•
•

Reading
Writing
Close reading
Critical Thinking

What are we afraid we will lose if we move away
...
UbD
Working on problems that are the right level of
difficulty is rewarding, but working on problems
that are too easy or too ...
Even if someone doesn’t tell you
the answer to a problem, once
you’ve had too many hints you
lose the sense that you’ve so...
Willingham Warning
“For material to be learned (that
is, to end up in long-term
memory), it must reside for
some period in...
We do not devote sufficient time to developing
questions.
Thus your memory is not a product of what you
want to remember o...
The smart way to go is to distribute practice not
only across time but also across activities.
In sum, successful thinking relies on four factors;
information from the environment , facts in
long-term memory, procedur...
3-2-1 Bridge
•
•
•
•

3 words
2 questions
1 metaphor/simile
Bridge: Identify how your
new response connected to
or shifted...
Questions

goo.gl/HhIba9
Scarcity
• Focus Dividend
• Tunneling
• Bandwidth Tax
A Word on Collaboration
“All of these challenges require us to
recognize that although human beings are
individually power...
A Word on Collaboration
“The great project of the twenty-first century—
understanding how the whole of humanity comes
to b...
Classroom Examples
Personal Interest Blogs
Personal Interest Blogs
Personal Interest Blogs
Googledocs
Tweeting History
What If Project
Creating Websites
Frederick Douglas Speeches
American Voices
Podcasting
Vlogs
Vlog Directions

Nonfiction
• What’s a vlog? Video + blog. A blog post in video form.
• Instructions: Create a three-to-fi...
Presentation Skills
Hamlet Movies
Final Cut Pro
Flipped Classroom
Documentary as Close Reading

• Sergei Eisenstein was a Soviet filmmaker who
proposed that meaning results from the "colli...
RSA Video
RSA Video
Documentaries
Awakening Project
Awakening Directions
TED Talks
Prezi
• Complete your graphic organizer that shows the liminal process for
your selected character. Recall the tips and fe...
Prezi
Prezi
Prezi
Infographic
Carlos Fuentes has an innovative style that is highly cinematic and has multiple focal points. This
can be see...
Infographics
Easel.ly
Inforgraphics
Infographics
Visual Article Summaries
Graphic Novel
Photo Essays
Facebook Projects
Gaming
Global Action Project
Personal Passion
Global Issues
Documentary Filmmaking
Social Enterprise
Final Product
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/
Rubric
http://edorigami.wikispaces.com
Compass Points
• E= Excitements. What excites you about these
ideas? What is the upside?
• W= Worries. What do you find wo...
Step One: Explanation
Step Two: Application
Step Three: Synthesis
• Reflection
• Review
• Reteach
• Relevancy
• Record not...
Managing Longer Blocks
5 Skills Teachers Need to Teach a Blocked Schedule

1) Planning
The ability to develop a pacing gui...
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
The hill school overview & examples 2013
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The hill school overview & examples 2013

  1. 1. Website http://goo.gl/7YHs8J
  2. 2. Reality • New Research on the brain • No longer College Prep • Now 21st Century Workforce Prep
  3. 3. Why
  4. 4. •Need to know how to deal with difficulties, how to struggle and how to be confused. •The Growth mindset knows how to capitalize on mistakes and confront deficiencies. •Struggle means you are working towards something important, something you are passionate about. •All of this leads to growing neurons!
  5. 5. Experience Comprehension Elaboration Application/intention
  6. 6. • Experience provides the new data that will be used to construct new knowledge. Comprehension provides the content structure of the developing knowledge. Elaboration emphasizes the organizational component of comprehension by relating similar previous experiences. Application engages the brain in recall of the labeled and sorted data.
  7. 7. The more ways something is learned, the more memory pathways are built. Effective teaching uses strategies to help students recognize patterns and then make the connections required to process the new working memory so they can travel into the brain’s longterm storage areas.
  8. 8. Prediction Sketch the abstract Experiential learning Relational memory Patterns Graphic organizers Personal meaning Cross-curricular Visualization Opportunities to interact with the information Repetition and consolidation
  9. 9. To take advantage of their engaged state of mind, students should have the opportunities to interact with the information they need to learn. The goal is for them to actively discover, interpret, analyze, process, practice and discuss the information so it will move beyond working memory and be processed in the frontal lobe regions devoted to executive function.
  10. 10. Amygdala safe area Formative assessment Rubrics Variety of assessment modalities Metacognition
  11. 11. Seven Survival Skills for the 21st Century • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving • Collaboration Across Networks and Leading by Influence • Agility and Adaptability • Initiative and Entrepreneurialism • Effective Oral and Written Communication • Assessing and Analyzing Information • Curiosity and Imagination
  12. 12. 21st Century Skills Critical thinking and problem solving Communications, information and media literacy Collaboration, teamwork and leadership Creativity and innovation Career and learning self-reliance Cross-cultural understanding
  13. 13. Innovation • There are essentially two very different kinds of innovation in both the for-profit and nonprofit arenas: incremental and disruptive. Incremental innovation is about significantly improving existing products, processes, or services. Disruptive or transformative innovation, on the other hand, is about creating a new or fundamentally different product or service that disrupts existing markets and displaces formerly dominant technologies. • Play, Passion, Purpose
  14. 14. Innovation • “If we are serious about preparing students to be innovators, we have some hard work ahead. Getting students ready to tackle tomorrow’s challenges means helping them develop a new set of skills and fresh ways of thinking that they won’t acquire through textbook-driven instruction. They need opportunities to practice these new skills on rightsized projects, with supports in place to scaffold learning. They need to persist and learn from setbacks.”
  15. 15. World Class Learners by Yong Zhao • Lady Gaga vs. Sausage Making • Empires die when they homogenize
  16. 16. High Tech High Habits of Mind 1. To think about significance 2. Perspective: what is the point of view 3. Evidence: how do you know 4. Connection: how does it apply 5. Supposition: what if it were different 6. Others: persistence, inquiry, voice, audience Met School 1. Communication: how do I take in and express an idea? 2. Empirical Reasoning: How do I prove it? 3. Personal Qualities: What do I bring to this process? 4. Quantitative Reasoning: how do I measure, compare, or represent it? 5. Social reasoning: what are other people’s perspectives on this? Coalition of Essential Schools 1. Learning to use one’s mind well 2. Less I more, depth over coverage 3. The same intellectual goals apply to all students 4. Personalization 5. Student as work, teacher as coach 6. Demonstration of mastery 7. A tone of decency and trust throughout the school 8. Commitment to the entire school 9. Resources dedicated to teaching and learning 10. Democracy and equity Habits of Learning: Francis W. Parker school 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Inquiry Expression Critical thinking Collaboration Organization Attentiveness Involvement reflection
  17. 17. Horizon Report 2010 The perceived value of innovation and creativity is increasing. Innovation is valued at the highest levels of business and must be embraced in schools if students are to succeed beyond their formal education. The ways we design learning experiences must reflect the growing importance of innovation and creativity as professional skills.
  18. 18. Thom Markham “The 21st Century Dilemma” It’s not the ‘A’ category—that’s Mastery or Commended or a similar high-ranking indicator. The breakthrough column goes beyond the A, rewarding innovation, creativity, and something outside the formal curriculum. It’s a ‘show me’ category. Students like it, and so do teachers. It particularly appeals to high-end students who feel current offerings are drab, and to the middling student who will not work just for a grade, but seeks the psychic reward of creating something cool.
  19. 19. Questions for Reflection • In our classrooms, how are we leveraging what we know about how children learn and how their brains work? • How are we teaching our students to be innovative? • How are we training our students for lives of purpose and service in the 21st century? • What 21st century skills are we teaching in our classrooms?
  20. 20. Digital and Media Literacy Existing paradigms in technology education must be shifted towards a focus on critical thinking and communication skills and away from “gee-whiz” gaping over new technology tools. We must consider the balance between protection and empowerment and respond seriously to the genuine risks associated with media and digital technology. We must better understand how digital and media literacy competencies are linked to print literacy skills and develop robust new approaches to measure learning progression. We must help people of all ages to learn skills that help them discriminate between high-quality information, marketing hype, and silly or harmful junk. We must raise the visibility and status of news and current events as powerful, engaging resources for both K–12 and lifelong learning while we acknowledge the challenges faced by journalism today and in the future.
  21. 21. • Develop proficiency with the tools of technology • Build relationships with others to pose and solve problems collaboratively and cross-culturally • Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes • Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information • Create, critique, analyze, and evaluate multimedia texts • Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments
  22. 22. • Develop proficiency with the tools of technology • Students in the 21st century should have experience with and develop skills around technological tools used in the classroom and the world around them. Through this they will learn about technology and learn through technology. In addition, they must be able to select the most appropriate tools to address particular needs. – Do students use technology as a tool for communication, research, and creation of new works? – Do students evaluate and use digital tools and resources that match the work they are doing? – Do students find relevant and reliable sources that meet their needs? – Do students take risks and try new things with tools available to them? – Do students, independently and collaboratively, solve problems as they arise in their work? – Do students use a variety of tools correctly and efficiently?
  23. 23. • • Design and share information for global communities that have a variety of purposes Students in the 21st century must be aware of the global nature of our world and be able to select, organize, and design information to be shared, understood, and distributed beyond their classrooms. • – – – – – – – Do students use inquiry to ask questions and solve problems? Do students critically analyze a variety of information from a variety of sources? Do students take responsibility for communicating their ideas in a variety of ways? Do students choose tools to share information that match their need and audience? Do students share and publish their work in a variety of ways? Do students solve real problems and share results with real audiences? Do students publish in ways that meet the needs of a particular, authentic audience?
  24. 24. Non-Negotiables • • • • Reading Writing Close reading Critical Thinking What are we afraid we will lose if we move away from the five-paragraph essay?
  25. 25. UbD
  26. 26. Working on problems that are the right level of difficulty is rewarding, but working on problems that are too easy or too difficult is unpleasant. Working memory has limited space, so thinking becomes increasingly difficult as working memory gets crowded.
  27. 27. Even if someone doesn’t tell you the answer to a problem, once you’ve had too many hints you lose the sense that you’ve solved the problem, and getting the answer doesn’t bring the same mental snap of satisfaction. Thinking occurs when you combine information (from environment and long-term memory) in new ways. That combining happens in working memory.
  28. 28. Willingham Warning “For material to be learned (that is, to end up in long-term memory), it must reside for some period in the working memory—that is, a student must pay attention to it. Further, how the student thinks of the experience completely determines what will end up in long-term memory” (63).
  29. 29. We do not devote sufficient time to developing questions. Thus your memory is not a product of what you want to remember or what you try to remember; it’s a product of what you think about. Memory is the residue of thought.
  30. 30. The smart way to go is to distribute practice not only across time but also across activities.
  31. 31. In sum, successful thinking relies on four factors; information from the environment , facts in long-term memory, procedures in long-term memory, and the amount of space in working memory. If any of these factors is inadequate, thinking will likely fail.
  32. 32. 3-2-1 Bridge • • • • 3 words 2 questions 1 metaphor/simile Bridge: Identify how your new response connected to or shifted from your initial response.
  33. 33. Questions goo.gl/HhIba9
  34. 34. Scarcity • Focus Dividend • Tunneling • Bandwidth Tax
  35. 35. A Word on Collaboration “All of these challenges require us to recognize that although human beings are individually powerful, we must act together to achieve what we could not accomplish on our own…The miracle of social networks in the modern world is that they unite us with other human beings and give us the capacity to cooperate on a scale so much larger than the one experienced in our ancient past” (304).
  36. 36. A Word on Collaboration “The great project of the twenty-first century— understanding how the whole of humanity comes to be greater than the sum of its parts—is just beginning. Like an awakening child, the human superorganism is becoming self-aware, and this will surely help us to achieve our goals. But the greatest gift of this awareness will be the sheer joy of selfdiscovery and the realization that to truly know ourselves, we must first understand how and why we are all connected” (305).
  37. 37. Classroom Examples
  38. 38. Personal Interest Blogs
  39. 39. Personal Interest Blogs
  40. 40. Personal Interest Blogs
  41. 41. Googledocs
  42. 42. Tweeting History
  43. 43. What If Project
  44. 44. Creating Websites
  45. 45. Frederick Douglas Speeches
  46. 46. American Voices
  47. 47. Podcasting
  48. 48. Vlogs
  49. 49. Vlog Directions Nonfiction • What’s a vlog? Video + blog. A blog post in video form. • Instructions: Create a three-to-five-minute vlog that addresses your final thoughts on the topic you’ve been blogging about. You may use PowerPoint or other tools or other images and video in your presentation if you like, but all that is needed for a great video is your beautiful face and some good energy. You will post this video and respond to each other's vlogs at a later date.
  50. 50. Presentation Skills
  51. 51. Hamlet Movies
  52. 52. Final Cut Pro
  53. 53. Flipped Classroom
  54. 54. Documentary as Close Reading • Sergei Eisenstein was a Soviet filmmaker who proposed that meaning results from the "collision" of images and, in our case, sound and text. Using the following formula, discuss how various elements are edited and combined in Born into Brothels and what effect the film maker hoped to achieve. • image+image+audio+text= possible meaning
  55. 55. RSA Video
  56. 56. RSA Video
  57. 57. Documentaries
  58. 58. Awakening Project
  59. 59. Awakening Directions
  60. 60. TED Talks
  61. 61. Prezi • Complete your graphic organizer that shows the liminal process for your selected character. Recall the tips and features used by classmates in their Liminal Prezis. Specifically, continue to TINKER with the DESIGN of the CONTENT of your prezi. • Add a path that highlights each of the items you have included so that your Liminal Prezi can be viewed as a show. • You will be asked to review three of your peers' Prezis. Please offer at least one comment on each of the Prezis you are given. That comment should address on specific passage that referenced in the path. Specifically, comment on how the design or appearance or placement of that passage in the Liminal Graphic Organizer communicates your classmate's understanding of the character.
  62. 62. Prezi
  63. 63. Prezi
  64. 64. Prezi
  65. 65. Infographic Carlos Fuentes has an innovative style that is highly cinematic and has multiple focal points. This can be seen throughout his novella, Aura. Your challenge is to capture his work visually in an infographic. This is one example. Using either http://visual.ly/ or http://www.easel.ly/, you will be creating an infographic for Aura. Process: Determine the purpose of your infographic: is it to tell the story, illustrate the importance of the symbols, explain the uncanny, discuss the marvelous, or all of the above? List the pertinent information your viewer/reader will need in order to understand the points you are trying to communicate. Brainstorm how this information can be communicated visually. Sketch out how each piece of information relates to each other and how you will visually represent those relationships. Begin building Using either http://visual.ly/ or http://www.easel.ly/. Test your infographic on someone who has not read the novella. Write a page-long, double-spaced explanation of what you were trying to communicate, what choices you made and why, what problems you may have encountered. Evaluation: Infographics will be evaluated on creativity, use of space, color and special relationships to other elements. The detail and clarity of your message will be assessed.
  66. 66. Infographics
  67. 67. Easel.ly
  68. 68. Inforgraphics
  69. 69. Infographics
  70. 70. Visual Article Summaries
  71. 71. Graphic Novel
  72. 72. Photo Essays
  73. 73. Facebook Projects
  74. 74. Gaming
  75. 75. Global Action Project Personal Passion Global Issues Documentary Filmmaking Social Enterprise
  76. 76. Final Product
  77. 77. http://rubistar.4teachers.org/
  78. 78. Rubric
  79. 79. http://edorigami.wikispaces.com
  80. 80. Compass Points • E= Excitements. What excites you about these ideas? What is the upside? • W= Worries. What do you find worrisome about these ideas? What is the downside? • N=Needs. What else do you need to know or find out? • S= Steps. What should your next steps be be be when thinking about these ideas?
  81. 81. Step One: Explanation Step Two: Application Step Three: Synthesis • Reflection • Review • Reteach • Relevancy • Record notes • Recall for tomorrow
  82. 82. Managing Longer Blocks 5 Skills Teachers Need to Teach a Blocked Schedule 1) Planning The ability to develop a pacing guide for the course in nine-week periods, which includes weekly and daily planning 2) Variety The ability to use several instructional strategies effectively 3) Vision The skill to design and maintain an environment that allows for great flexibility and creativity 4) Management The desire and skill to be an effective classroom manager 5) Openness The freedom to share the ownership of teaching and learning with the students

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