Wk7 assignbuchmillerl7

222 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
222
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Wk7 assignbuchmillerl7

  1. 1. GETTING TO KNOW YOUR LITERACY LEARNERS Cognitive Aspects of Reading-Conduct reading inventory to assess the students performance and growth.-Five Target Areas Include: -Phonemic Awareness -Phonics -Fluency -Vocabulary -Comprehension Afflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment k-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association 2
  2. 2. GETTING TO KNOW YOUR LITERACY LEARNERS Noncognitive Aspects of Reading-Motivation to Read Profile Survey -Motivated readers want to engage with the text. -Two components of profile: -How does the student see himself as a reader and writer? -Does the student find value in reading and writing? Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518--533. 3
  3. 3. GETTING TO KNOW YOUR LITERACY LEARNERS Noncognitive Aspects of Reading-Motivation to Read Profile Survey -Students who have lower scores in self-concept might benefit from positive reading experiences such as reading to younger children. -Students who have lower value in reading scores might benefit from reading text that are interesting to the student. Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518--533. 4
  4. 4. GETTING TO KNOW YOUR LITERACY LEARNERS Noncognitive Aspects of Reading -Motivation to Read Profile Conversational Interview -Allows teacher to have an insight into the student’s reading experiences. -Three sections to determine motivational factors concerning: -when student reads narrative text -when student reads informational text -general factors related to reading motivation Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518--533. 5
  5. 5. GETTING TO KNOW YOUR LITERACY LEARNERS Framework for Literacy Instruction-Interactive Perspective -Teachers should conduct cognitive and noncognitive assessments to evaluate the strengths and needs of her students.-Critical Perspective -Teacher should find out what is important to her students.-Response Perspective -Teacher should find how students identify themselves. 6
  6. 6. Now that you know your students needs to develop as readers, knowwhat interests them, and what motivates them it is time to chooseappropriate texts that will engage your students. 7
  7. 7. SELECTING TEXTS USING THE LITERACY MATRIXThe Literacy Teachers model howMatrix is a tool for students should read Semiotic Linguistic different types of text.teachers to evaluatethe types of texts Different text typesthey are using in the allows students toclassroom. have multiple perspectives on a Narrative Informational topic. Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). 2010. The Beginning Reader. [video webcast]. Analyzing and selecting text. Baltimore, MD 8
  8. 8. SELECTING TEXTS FOR YOUR READERS Framework for Literacy Instruction-Interactive Perspective -The structures, type, and genre of text should meet the needs of the student and literacy goals and objectives.-Critical Perspective -Students need to have opportunities to evaluate, judge, and think critically about different types of texts.-Responsive Perspective -Students should be provided texts in which they can relate to and will cause a personal response. 9
  9. 9. You have completed assessments in order to know your studentsneeds, interests, and motivation. You have chosen appropriate textsthat will engage your students. Now it is time to implementinstructional practices that will help your students continue to grow intheir literacy development. 10
  10. 10. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE FOR THE INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE Teachers need to direct teach students to be metacognitive thinkers while they are reading. -Instructional practice to teach students strategies for unknown words in text. -Context clue strategy with the word Lerkin from The Lorax. -Readers use surrounding words, sentences, and pictures to determine the meaning of the unknown word. Reader rereads sentence to see if meaning of word makes sense. -Teacher models strategy, scaffold the strategy, and encourages students to use strategy. Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). 2010. The Beginning Reader. [video webcast]. Strategic processing. Baltimore, MD Tompkins, G. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century. Boston, MA 11
  11. 11. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE FOR CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE-Students live in the Informational Age -Readers need to develop a critical perspective to determine the validity of text and who and why did they write the text. -They need to see multiple perspectives that are different from their own. -The students discussed why Dr. Seuss wrote the Lorax. They visited The Lorax Project website and discussed why the website and book are connected. Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). 2010. The Beginning Reader. [video webcast]. Critical perspective of text. Baltimore, MD. 12
  12. 12. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE FOR RESPONSIVE PERSPECTIVE-The reader-response theory is the work of Louise Rosenblatt. Rosenblatt’swork is based upon each reader brings personal experiences, feelings, andassociations to text-The lesson objective was to remind students to read and learn more abouttheir interests. Once they learn more about their interests they shouldrespond in a meaningful way.-The students used The Lorax website to learn about some endangeredanimals and their changing habitats. Then they wrote an followed the PostOffice link on the website to send an email to the Lorax to share what theydo to help our planet. http://www.seussville.com/loraxproject/ Mora, P., and Welch, J., (2012), The Expanding Cannon: Teaching multicultural literature in high school workshop. Retrieved from: http://www.learner.org/workshops/hslit/session1/index.html 13
  13. 13. STEPS TO CREATE A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT1. Get to know your literacy learners. What are their literacy needs, what interests them, and what motivates them.2. Select a variety of texts for your learners to meet their needs and your literacy objectives.3. Teach students to be metacognitive thinkers while they are reading text.4. Use instructional practices to help students develop a critical perspective.5. Use instructional practices to provide students an opportunity to respond to the text. 14
  14. 14. REFERENCESAfflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment k-12. Newark, DE: International Reading AssociationGambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518--533.Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). 2010. The Beginning Reader. [video webcast]. Analyzing and selecting text. Baltimore, MDLaureate Education, Inc. (Producer). 2010. The Beginning Reader. [video webcast]. Critical perspective of text. Baltimore, MD.Mora, P., and Welch, J., (2012), The Expanding Cannon: Teaching multicultural literature in high school workshop. Retrieved from: http://www.learner.org/workshops/hslit/session1/index.html 15

×