1st class culture, identity, and mass media

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  • 1st class culture, identity, and mass media

    1. 1. Culture, Identity and Mass Media
    2. 2. relevant infoInstructor:Lara Mazurski, Drs. (L.E.Mazurski@uva.nl)Time and LocationWednesday, 09:00 to 12:00am, Bungehuis K.03Credits:10 EC
    3. 3. description• What is the mass media? What is the role of the mass media in relation both to culture and identity? How do ideological forces shape our understanding of them? This course provides students with the opportunity to investigate the intersections of media, culture, and identity. Focus will be placed upon critical perspectives that have informed and contributed to our understanding of the media and how meaning is made. By the end of the class the student will be critically aware of the relationship between cultures, identities, and the mass media. Further s/he will be able to apply this knowledge to the analysis of visual and narrative texts.. We will also look at a number of objects including film, literature, and music through an interdisciplinary lens from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, literary studies, cultural studies, and cultural analysis. We will discuss texts by, among others, Judith Butler, Michel Foucualt, Stuart Hall, Roland Barthes, Noam Chomsky, and Marshall McLuhan.
    4. 4. evaluation• Regular Attendance and Class Participation: 15%• Presentations 25%• Exam 60%• Because this class is an interactive seminar, regular attendance is mandatory. More than three missed classes without prior notice or documented excused will require you to drop the class.• Required Reading• Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. Practices of Looking: an Introduction to Visual Culture. New York: Oxford UP, 2009. Print.• Available at the Athenaeum Bokehandel, Spui 14-16• PDF Reader will be available on BlackBoard (BB)
    5. 5. presentations• Students will present their own object(s) of their choice as they relate to topics in the class and according to the methodologies and theories that have been discussed in previous sessions. The presentation will be no longer than 10 minutes with 5 additional minutes allocated for question and answer.• Note: we will also have a number of group exercises
    6. 6. Month: Feb scheduleWeek 2 Looking, Reading, and NegotiatingDate Feb 9 Read Introduction & Chapter 1, “Practices of Looking: Images, Power, and Politics”pp. 1-43Week 3 Making Meaning: Ideological SubjectsDate Feb 16 Read Chapter 2, “Viewers Make Meaning” pp. 45-70Week 4 The Gaze: Lacan, Foucault and MulveyDate Feb 23 Read Spectatorship, Power, Knowledge, pp. 72 –102 Watch selections from Hitchcock, Lynch, and Zizek
    7. 7. schedule Month: MarchWeek 5 Politics of Exhibiting Other CulturesDate March 2 Read Hall, Stuart “The Poetics and the Politics of Exhibiting Other Cultures”Week 6Date March 9 FIELD TRIP: TROPENMUSEUMWeek 7 Images as PoliticsDate March 16 Read Reproduction and Visual TechnologiesWeek 8 Critiquing the Mass MediaDate March 23 Read The Mass Media and the Public Sphere PresentationsWeek 9 Manufacturing ConsentDate March 30 Read Excerpt from Herman, Edward S., and Noam Chomsky. Manufacturing Consent Watch selections Manufacturing Consent (in class)
    8. 8. Month: April scheduleWeek 10 Consumer FetishismDate April 6 Read Consumer Culture and Manufacturing of Desire, pp. 189-235 Selections from Karl Marx and Louis Althusser Presentations on Culture JammingWeek 11 PostmodernismDate April 13 Read Postmodernism and Popular Culture, pp. 237-277 PresentationsWeek 12 Queer Theory: Gaga Feminism or Not?Date April 20 Watch Judith Halberstam Gaga Feminism Read selection from Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble PresentationsWeek 13Date April 27 FIELD TRIP: STEDELIJK MUSEUM
    9. 9. schedule Month: MayWeek 14 Global Visual CultureDate May 4 Read The Global View of Visual Culture, pp. 315- 346 Guest Speaker PresentationsWeek 15May 11 No Classes Public HolidayWeek 16 Images as ScienceDate May 18 Read Scientific Looking, Looking at Science, pp. 279-313 Guest Speaker Take Home Exam *Take home exam due Wednesday May 25th by 9 am
    10. 10. praticial mattersplagiarismcitations
    11. 11. plagiarism What does the UvA consider fraud and plagiarism?The UvA defines the following as examples of fraud and plagiarism: copying answers duringexaminations, cutting and pasting from another source or using a text without properacknowledgement of the source. University students must follow standard academic practices.What does the complete and correct acknowledgement of a source entail?If you write a text and refer to information written by another person, you must state the sourceinvolved, whether it is a book, article or a text on the Internet. If you do not cite the source,thereby creating the impression that the text or information was written or thought up by you,this is known as plagiarism. Creatively cutting and pasting or rearranging the work of anotherperson is considered plagiarism and will not be tolerated. You are never allowed to takeanother person’s ideas – even if you put them into your own words – and pass them off as yourown. If you use a text written by someone else in one of your own papers, you must always cite thesource and location in the notes and/or bibliography. This is because all information used inacademic papers must be traceable, such that other parties can verify the sources andarguments used. This applies to scholars and academics, but also to university students.Are you allowed to use Internet sources?Yes, but certain rules apply. Be critical when using Internet sources, because they are notalways reliable or up to date. When using an Internet source, you must always state thewebsite where you found it in a note.
    12. 12. plagarism How does the UvA detect fraud and plagiarism?Instructors use anti-plagiarism software, consisting of electronic detection programmes thatallow them to trace plagiarism. What sanctions are imposed in cases of fraud and plagiarism?A paper or thesis that shows evidence of plagiarism will be immediately declared invalid. Iffraud or plagiarism is suspected, the examiner or instructor will notify the ExaminationBoard. The Examination Board will evaluate the case and may impose sanctions. A studentmay be excluded from participation in all examinations for the maximum period of one year.
    13. 13. citations The Modern Language Association (MLA) Style is widely used for identifying research sources. In MLA style you briefly credit sources with parenthetical citations in the text of your paper, and give the complete description of each source in your Works Cited list. The Works Cited list, or Bibliography, is a list of all the sources used in your paper, arranged alphabetically by authors last name, or when there is no author, by the first word of the title (except A, An or The). [5.1-5.5]For example:In the text of your paper:The first gambling Web site appeared in 1995, and online gambling has since become the most lucrativeInternet business (Will 92). or, George Will reported that in 2002 Internet gambling surpassedpornography to become the Internets most lucrative business (92).In your Works Cited list:Will, George F. "Electronic Morphine." Newsweek 25 Nov. 2002: 92.The following examples are based on the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed., byJoseph Gibaldi. (Ref LB2369 .G53 2003) The numbers in [ ] refer to the appropriate chapters in thehandbook.
    14. 14. citations examples This is the basic format for a Works Cited entry. Take the title from the title page, not the cover. The authors name should be written Last Name, First Name.One Author [5.6.1]Brinkley, Alan. The Unfinished Nation. New York: Knopf, 1993.Editor or Compiler [5.6.2] If the person named on the title page is the editor or compiler, rather than the author, add a comma then the abbreviation "ed." or "comp."Carpenter, Allan, comp. Facts About the Cities. New York: Wilson, 1992.Kreider, Jan F., ed. Handbook of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Boca Raton: CRC, 1993. Journal with Issues Paged Separately [5.7.2]Author. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume number. Issue number (Year): Page(s). Give both the volume and issue numbers, separated by a period. e.g. volume 12, no. 8 = 12.8Murphy, Karen L., Roseanne DePasquale, and Erin McNamara. "Meaningful Connections: Using Technology inPrimary Classrooms." Young Children 58.6 (2003): 12-18.
    15. 15. generatorhttp://www.easybib.com/
    16. 16. blackboard (BB)make sure to check BB for class updates and textsalso to check for discussions and or assignments
    17. 17. do you know what to do for next week? Buy your text book or go to BB and find the scanned text READ Introduction & Chapter 1, “Practices of Looking: Images, Power, and Politics” pp. 1-43 in Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. Practices of Looking: an Introduction to VisualCulture. New York: Oxford UP, 2009. Print.
    18. 18. see ya next week

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