Poetry analysis

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Poetry analysis

  1. 1. Poetry Analysis 3 Part Process
  2. 2. Summary Paragraph The first paragraph of your poetry analysis essays will be a summary of the content of the poem. Format:  Chronological  Focus on Author (Power Verbs)  Transitions
  3. 3. Sample – Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening Topic Sentence:  In “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening,” Robert Frost relates an event involving a traveler through the woods on a snowy evening. Title and Author’s name Basic event of the poem
  4. 4. Sample - Continued 1st Stanza  In the first stanza, the speaker reveals that he believes that he knows whose woods these are, but he is not worried about stopping to watch the snow because the owner of the house actually lives in the village.
  5. 5. Sample - Continued 2nd Stanza  In stanza two, the focus shifts to the speaker’s horse. The speaker believes his horse probably thinks he is strange to be stopping because there is no farmhouse. Further, there is only a frozen lake and it is the darkest evening of the year or the winter solstice.
  6. 6. Sample - Continued 3rd Stanza  In the third stanza, the horse seems to get impatient as he shakes his harness bells almost as if he is asking a question. The only other sounds that speaker hears are the sound of wind and snow falling
  7. 7. Sample - Continued 4th Stanza  At this point, in the final stanza, the speaker reflects on the woods. He states that the woods are both “lovely” but also “dark and deep.” He seems to want to stay there and enter the woods, but then says he has “promises to keep.” He does not elaborate on the promises that he has to keep, but he does say he also has “miles to go before I sleep.” This line is obviously important to the poem because it is repeated a second time.
  8. 8. Tone Paragraph The tone paragraph  Is written chronologically  Identifies the different tones in the poem  Explains to the reader HOW the author creates these tones  Identifies where the tone shifts and HOW it shifts  MUST include direct quotes from the poem.
  9. 9. Sample Tone Paragraph – Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening Topic Sentence:  MUST include the word “tone” in this sentence.  The tone in “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening” is set in the first stanza through the images and sounds created by the author.
  10. 10. Sample - Continued The alliteration of “h” creates a soft and soothing sound throughout this stanza that leads to a calm or soothing tone.  HOW – alliteration of “h”  WHY – creates a soft and soothing sound
  11. 11. Sample - Continued Frost further develops this tone with the image of the speaker watching the “woods fill up with snow.” Since the speaker can stop to watch the snow, he is not rushed thus the feeling of calm continues. The snow blanketing the woods in white also transforms a place that usually is associated with darkness and fear into something beautiful.  HOW - the image of the speaker watching the “woods fill up with snow.”  WHY - Since the speaker can stop to watch the snow, he is not rushed thus the feeling of calm continues  WHY - snow blanketing the woods in white also transforms a place that usually is associated with darkness and fear into something beautiful
  12. 12. Sample Continued The tone shifts in stanza two when the speaker’s awareness of the horse is revealed through personification. The horse thinks (a human ability) that this situation is strange. By placing the horse on the same level as the speaker, the speaker must acknowledge that the situation may actually be strange and a feeling of anxiety or questioning develops.  HOW - the speaker’s awareness of the horse is revealed through personification  WHY - By placing the horse on the same level as the speaker, the speaker must acknowledge that the situation may actually be strange and a feeling of anxiety or questioning develops.
  13. 13. Sample Continued That tone of anxiety or nervousness heightens when the images of the “woods,” “frozen lake,” and “darkest evening of the year” appear. Unlike the transforming snow in stanza one, these images of the words and winter are not comforting, but foreboding.  HOW - the images of the “woods,” “frozen lake,” and “darkest evening of the year” appear.  WHY - these images of the words and winter are not comforting, but foreboding.
  14. 14. Sample - Continued This tone continues into the third stanza with the metaphor of the harness bells to a questioning voice. Bells traditionally symbolize a reminder of obligation. Because this symbol of obligation is combined with questioning if there is a mistake, the anxious tone continues.  HOW - the metaphor of the harness bells to a questioning voice  WHY - Because this symbol of obligation is combined with questioning if there is a mistake, the anxious tone continues.
  15. 15. Sample Continued In the last two lines of this stanza, the tone shifts again with the alliteration of “s” and the images of “easy wind” and “downy flake.” The soothing sound of “s” and the choice of “easy” to describe the wind as well as “downy” to describe the snow create a comforting tone as if a soft blanket has been wrapped around the speaker and the scene.  HOW - the alliteration of “s” and the images of “easy wind” and “downy flake.”  WHY - The soothing sound of “s” the snow create a comforting tone as if a soft blanket has been wrapped around the speaker and the scene.
  16. 16. Sample - Continued At this point the speaker meditates on the woods as if they are inviting or tempting when he calls them “lovely, dark and deep.”  HOW - “lovely, dark and deep.”  WHY - the speaker meditates on the woods as if they are inviting or tempting
  17. 17. Sample Continued This new tone of desire, however, is soon replaced with a reminder of obligations with the “promises to keep” and the repetition of the final two lines, “And miles to go before I sleep.” The repetition of the lines indicates how important it is, thus there is a tone of both disappointment at having to leave the woods but also a tone of acceptance of his obligations.  HOW - reminder of obligations with the “promises to keep” and the repetition of the final two lines, “And miles to go before I sleep.”  WHY - The repetition of the lines indicates how important it is, thus there is a tone of both disappointment at having to leave the woods but also a tone of acceptance of his obligations.

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