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Gandhi and Mandela<br />By: Laura Kwan <br />
Gandhi non-cooperation movement<br />The Non-cooperation Movement was started by Gandhi in 1920 and lasted until 1922.<br ...
GandhiThe salt march<br />In 1930, Gandhi launched a satyāgraha against the government’s decision to tax salt, which later...
Mandelathe treason trials<br />In December 1956, the government responded to the resistance movement building in the count...
MandelaWinnie Madikizela-Mandela<br />Winnie, a social worker in Johannesburg, married Nelson Mandela after he and his fir...
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Gandhi & Mandela

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Gandhi & Mandela

  1. 1. Gandhi and Mandela<br />By: Laura Kwan <br />
  2. 2. Gandhi non-cooperation movement<br />The Non-cooperation Movement was started by Gandhi in 1920 and lasted until 1922.<br />Gandhi had promised independence ‘within a year’ if non-cooperation was total and widespread.<br />There were many stages and it involved resignation from government services; refusal to use courts and schools, pay taxes, and serve in the armed forces; and the burning of foreign cloth.<br />Because of his leadership in this movement, Gandhi was arrested in March of 1922 and put on trial. He was ultimately sentenced to 6 years in prison, but was praised by the judge for his actions in court.<br />Although Gandhi was put in jail because of this movement, it still had a large impact. It made political independence a national goal and radicalized a large number of Indians.<br />
  3. 3. GandhiThe salt march<br />In 1930, Gandhi launched a satyāgraha against the government’s decision to tax salt, which later became known as the “Salt March.”<br />It consisted of a 24-day march south towards the coastal village of Dandi where they would break the law by making salt on the seashore.<br />When Gandhi and thousands of his companions made it to Dandi and illegally made salt, they were brutally beaten and arrested.<br />Although Gandhi and 60,000 others were incarcerated, the Salt March was successful in demonstrating the inhumanity of the colonial government and also at internationalizing the Indian struggle for independence. It exposed the British government to considerable world pressure.<br />
  4. 4. Mandelathe treason trials<br />In December 1956, the government responded to the resistance movement building in the country by arresting key participants in the Defiance Campaign and Congress of the People.<br />156 people were arrested, including Nelson Mandela. They were charged with high treason.<br />Of the 156 people originally arrested, only 30 were accused. The trials not only crippled the livelihoods of many, but also Mandela’s law pratice.<br />In 1961 the Treason Trial collapsed with a full acquittal for all. The judges had been unable to establish that the ANC had planned to overthrow the state by violence.<br />
  5. 5. MandelaWinnie Madikizela-Mandela<br />Winnie, a social worker in Johannesburg, married Nelson Mandela after he and his first wife, Evelyn, divorced.<br />She was, as Nelson had said, “a real brick” during his time in prison. She herself was also persecuted by the police; always under surveillance, suffered from harassment and banishment.<br />Winnie later became notorious for her corruption and power trips. She had a “Football Club” of bodyguards that were accused of assaulting and murdering the child “Stompie” Seipei. It is because of Winnie’s infamy and violence that Nelson Mandela divorced her, he knew she had harmed his family’s good reputation.<br />

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