Basic “shared” version
of L. Kaptain’s NASM
     presentation


         112309
Aronica, L., & Robinson, K. (2009). The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything. San Clemente: Tantor
Media.
...
Self-Evaluation for the Music
          Executive:
  Using a Portfolio Approach to
Demonstrate Successful Leadership
     ...
mb er


   3
Nove


 2
Signals?
Signposts?
criteria for expectations
is often listed in the position
announcement,

but once the hire is made—

evaluative criteria i...
The creation of an
administrative portfolio

+
music executive = show
success and accomplishment,
the unit.
E ducate
                 you r dean
                 or pr ovost



B e eva luated
on your  terms
Do n’t ask




             Do
shape position

advance unit
Post it on the
     web


                 Ta ke cha  rge of
                  your   job and
                  make    it...
Inreach

     Sue Haug, Penn State
They don’t understand
(photo of standing ovation)




They don’t come to
    our events
(photo of empty auditorium)




(Why should they?)
We aren’t on
 their radar
   screen
       (photo of radar installation)
They don’t understand
       again............
Are they informed
about the national arts
   conversations?
Do they know about
 Sir Ken Robinson,
Benjamin Zander, and
    Daniel Pink?
Buy them a book!
Do they know about
 the huge economic
impact of the arts on
    your campus?
In the community?
1,600,000+
More than the New
 Orleans Saints or
     Hornets
Do you send links to
    TED talks?

       TED.co
             m
Do you buy them
    books?
Alan Fletcher
Keynote Address to
     NASM,
 November 2008
Obama National Arts Policy
 Committee, October 2008
America’s artists are the
guardians of the spirit of
questioning, of innovation, of
reaching across the barriers
that fenc...
from the six billion other
people with whom we share
   this dark and dazzling
           world.
Art increases
 the sense of our
common humanity.
The imagination of the artist
is, therefore, a profoundly
moral imagination: the
easier it is for you to
imagine walking i...
If you want to
make a torturer,
   first kill his
  imagination.
If you want to create a
nation that will stand by
and allow torture to be
practiced in its name,
then go ahead and kill
it...
You could start by cutting
school funding for art,
music, creative writing
and the performing arts.
Will you be ready?
(photo of elevator door)
Chancellor, Provost, Dean,
governmental, community,
  philanthropic, artistic
         leaders
30 seconds
Do we understand
   ourselves?
Do we know ourselves?
1Myers-Briggs® Type Indicator
2Strong
3TKI Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode
 Instrument (TKI)
4FIRO® Fundamental Interpersonal...
https://
www.cpp.com/
Fundamental
Interpersonal
Relations
OrientationTM (FIRO®)
help people understand their
behavior—and that of others—
in interpersonal situations.
part of leadership and
coaching, te...
50-yrs.
15 minutes
Practical Tools for Reducing Conflict.
The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode
Instrument (TKI) is an assessment for
understanding ...
It’s also a fast and powerful
tool that can go beyond
conflict management to
support your team-
building, leadership and
co...
The TKI measures five
“conflict-handling modes,” or
ways of dealing with conflict:
competing
collaborating
compromising
avoiding
accommodating
two dimensions:
assertiveness and
 cooperativeness
cooperativeness
refers to the extent
to which one tries to
satisfy the concerns
of another person
Competing is assertive
and not cooperative
accommodating is
cooperative and not
assertive
Avoiding is neither
assertive nor cooperative
collaborating is both
    assertive and
     cooperative
Compromising falls in
 the middle on both
     dimensions
competing
collaborating
compromising
avoiding
accommodating
A personality test that’s
     not “heavy”
http://www.enneagraminstitute.com
View from the........
Your
provost or
   dean
Know their job
Know their style
self-evaluation
• Position description (when you were
  hired)

• Personal Statement of Philosophy and
  Vision for 2009-10

• Evidence of...
• 2010-11 Goals (set in June, 2010)
• Long-term Goals
• Final comments
•
What’s the
logic behind
portfolios?
           Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accredit...
How is a typical
portfolio organized?



             Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Acc...
How does the
administrative portfolio
differ from the usual end-
of-the-year report to an
immediate superior?

           ...
is  the
        lon g         o?
H ow           rt foli
       ca lp o
t yp i

                 Copyright © 2008 - America...
How much time does it
take to prepare a portfolio




                Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher E...
Don’t all portfolios
look alike?


            Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditat...
Can an impressive
portfolio gloss over
weak administrative
performance?
               Copyright © 2008 - American Associa...
Why would very busy administrato
want to take the time and trouble t
prepare a portfolio?




                      Copyri...
To prepare materials about their
administrative effectiveness when
applying for a new position.




                      ...
To seek administrative awards,
grants, or merit pay.




                     Copyright © 2008 - American Association for ...
To document for themselves
how their administrative
style has evolved over time.



                     Copyright © 2008 ...
To acquaint their new supervisor with
the evolution of the position and the
breadth of their activities and
accomplishment...
How do portfolios prompt
reflective practice and
improvement?




                  Copyright © 2008 - American Association...
Why is collaboration
important in preparing a
portfolio? 




                 Copyright © 2008 - American Association for...
Why are portfolio mentors and
models so important to
administrators who are
preparing their own portfolios?



           ...
What is the value of
self-reflection in an
administrative
portfolio?


                 Copyright © 2008 - American Associa...
Small group work
1) How do you work with faculty
members (or chairs or deans) who
are struggling in their jobs?

                      Copy...
2) How do you work with students
who are academically struggling?


                      Copyright © 2008 - American Asso...
3) What parts of your administrative
position do you handle most (or
least) effectively? Why?

                       Copy...
4) What new administrative strategies
have you tried in the last year? How
successful were they?

                       C...
5) What did you learn from the
success (or failure) of those new
approaches?

                       Copyright © 2008 - Am...
6) What have you learned about
yourself as an administrator that
needs changing this year?
                       Copyrigh...
Report out
1) How do you work with faculty
members (or chairs or deans) who
are struggling in their jobs?

                      Copy...
2) How do you work with students
who are academically struggling?


                      Copyright © 2008 - American Asso...
3) What parts of your administrative
position do you handle most (or
least) effectively? Why?

                       Copy...
4) What new administrative strategies
have you tried in the last year? How
successful were they?

                       C...
5) What did you learn from the
success (or failure) of those new
approaches?

                       Copyright © 2008 - Am...
6) What have you learned about
yourself as an administrator that
needs changing this year?
                       Copyrigh...
3
3   Pages
    Ideas
2010-11
 Goals
1.
Catalyzing the action that will transform...
2.
 Working with and inspiring faculty...
3.
 Demonstrating the understand...
Bullet-point short-term

2-3 sentences for long-term
3
Zaffron and Logan set
out the Three Laws
of Performance as
follows:
1) How people
perform correlates
to how situations
occur to them.
That is, people always act in
accordance with the way
they explain the world to
themselves, which can be
quite different f...
2) How a situation
occurs arises in
language.
That is, language is the vehicle we use
to self-create our sense of reality.
Zaffron and Logan use “language” in
the broad...
3) Future-based language
transforms how situations
occur to people.
Here Zaffron and Logan
distinguish between descriptive
language – the words we use
to describe how things are or
have been...
1) A complaint that has
  persisted for some
         time.
2) A pattern of behavior that
     goes along with the
     complaint (irritated,
  wronged, disappointment,
   inability ...
Complaint and behavior
 are so entrenched--
      folks think:

“That’s who they are.”
3) The payoff for the
     complaint?
4) Cost of the behavior
Complaint a disguise
for something deeper?
Way to control a
  situation?
persuade
verb [ trans. ]
cause (someone) to do something through reasoning or argument : it wasn't easy, but I persuaded h...
Recap
succinct manner
read and absorbed
by academic
provide valuable information

draw positive attention

provide a better understanding of the unit needs

of the music exec...
job performance
On  your
 te rms
Evidence
Goals for the
 next year
Use their language
Quote and format to fit
Mission
Vision
Values
3 resources:
 research on your boss
      Peter Seldin
cpp.com and enneagram
Comments?
Questions?
Self-Evaluation for the Music
          Executive:
  Using a Portfolio Approach to
Demonstrate Successful Leadership
     ...
kaptain@lsu.edu

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  • LK experience at new music executives presentation last November.

    60-0
  • Every campus culture is different--and ever changing.
    Look at the turnover in Chancellors, Provosts, Deans and Chairs
  • Without looking closely at new opportunotites--perhaps luck is the best hope.
  • OK--new in the job?
  • This might be one way for demonstrating leadership, success, and accomplishment
  • Who is the expert at what we do?
    Although I did have a President who wanted to help select repertoire and set the stage
  • To initiate your own self-evaluation--it may be netter not to ask. COnstruct one using your best instincts and intel on your Dean or Provost.
  • Don’t we all discover a different reality than what was in the position announcement?
  • Project placing your portfolio on the web--and allow your colleagues to take stock of your successes and achievements. This takes the mystery out of “what are you doing?”
  • This session is somewhat of a continuation of the Advocacy within session chaired by Sue Haug that was presented on Saturday.
  • A decoyed form of blame (them--they don’t understand)
  • Why should they? Is the venue terrific? Lighting? Sound? CLimate control? Seats comfortable? Printed program first rate?
  • This allows us all an excuse
  • If not--then you have missed an important chance. Everything that they learn from another source could lessen your stature as a leader in the field.
  • They should know these names and their work.
  • This is also something profound. $27 per person per performance?
  • Translate attendance into income put back into the community and jobs. How many atteded perfomances?
  • These are very important messages that are succict and POWERFUL.
  • This can help you a great deal--even if they don’t read them.
  • For the ride in the elevator?
  • Earlier evaluation methods, such as evidence of impact on college/university committees, were like flashlights. That is, they illuminated only those administrative skills and abilities that fell within their beams. As such, they shed light on only a small part of an administrator’s performance. But with the portfolio, a searchlight replaces the flashlight. Its far broader beam discloses the broad range of administrative philosophy, attitudes, abilities, skills, and goals.
  • It usually starts with a one-page introductory statement that provides the portfolio purpose and sets the institutional context and administrative unit. An independent liberal arts college and a department of psychology, for example. This is typically followed by a two- to three-page description of specific administrative responsibilities (programs, policies, faculty, staff, students, budget), as well as a reflective statement of administrative philosophy, objectives, and strategies. The next section of the portfolio usually contains two to three pages of performance evaluation data from multiple sources (superiors, staff, subordinates, faculty peers, students, alumni). The portfolio continues with sections on administrative innovations (What worked? What didn’t? Why?), efforts to improve and develop performance, evidence of impact on areas of responsibility (annual reports, participation levels), most significant accomplishments, and short- and long-term administrative goals. Typically, the portfolio is housed in a three-ring binder.
  • First, the portfolio empowers administrators to include documents and materials that, in their judgment, best reflect their performance. It is not limited just to items requested by their immediate superior. Second, the purpose of the portfolio determines what material is included and how it is arranged. Third, the portfolio is based on collaboration and mentoring. It is not prepared by administrators in isolation. Fourth, in the very preparation of the portfolio, administrators are often stimulated to be reflective about why they do what they do. For many, this reflection produces — almost as a by-product — an improvement in performance.
  • The typical portfolio has a narrative of approximately eight to 12 double-spaced pages, followed by a series of appendices that provide documentation for the claims made in the narrative. (Some institutions put a ceiling on the number of pages they permit to prevent data overkill.) An important point: The portfolio is not a “fluff” document. Every claim of accomplishment made in the narrative must be supported by hard evidence in the appendices.
  • It depends on whether the administrator currently prepares an annual report. If he or she does, much of the material will already be on hand and portfolio preparation will probably take between 12 and 15 hours, spread over a number of days. But if the administrator does not usually prepare an annual report, the needed documents and materials are likely to be scattered and less organized. In that case, it probably will take between 15 and 20 hours, spread over a number of days, to prepare the portfolio. Whether the administrator has an annual report or not, a large part of the preparation time is spent in thinking, planning, gathering, and sifting through the documentation.
  • Not at all. The portfolio is a highly individualized product. Both the content and organization vary widely from one portfolio to another. They are grounded in the specifics and contexts of a particular administrative position in a particular college or university at a particular point in time. Different administrative positions cater to different types of documentation. For example, the position of graduate school dean in a research university is worlds apart from that of sociology department chair at a small liberal arts college. And the position of vice president of academic affairs at a community college is far removed from that of director of an academic division, even at the same institution.
  • Absolutely not. Why? Because the portfolio is an evidence-based document. Supporting material must be included for every claim made. The weak administrator cannot document strong performance. The evidence is just not there. For example, an administrator who claims to have boosted student retention rates by 5 percent must provide hard data in the appendix to support that statement. Fancy computer graphics and an elegant portfolio cover cannot disguise weak performance for an administrator any more than they can for a student.
  • They might do so to gather and present hard evidence and specific data about administrative effectiveness for those who judge performance. Or to provide the needed structure for self-reflection about which areas of their performance require improvement. There are other reasons why administrators might prepare a portfolio.
  • Or, when you get a new boss
  • In the preparation of the portfolio, the administrator is forced to ponder personal administrative activities, organize priorities, rethink administrative strategies, and plan for the future. Portfolios display the thoughts behind the action, not just the results. The process of thoughtful reflection augmented by the gathering and integrating of documents and materials provides data to assist the faltering, to motivate the tired,In the preparation of the portfolio, the administrator is forced to ponder personal administrative activities, organize priorities, rethink administrative strategies, and plan for the future. Portfolios display the thoughts behind the action, not just the results. The process of thoughtful reflection augmented by the gathering and integrating of documents and materials provides data to assist the faltering, to motivate the tired, and to encourage the indecisive.
    and to encourage the indecisive.
  • Although portfolios can be prepared by the administrator working alone, this isolated approach has limited prospects for improving performance or contributing to personnel decisions. Why? Because portfolios prepared by the administrator working alone do not include the collegial or supervisory support needed in a program of improvement. And, importantly, there is none of the control or corroboration of evidence that is essential to sustain personnel decisions. In addition, collaboration ensures a fresh, critical perspective that encourages cohesion between the portfolio narrative and supporting appendix evidence.
  • Since most administrators come to the portfolio process with no prior experience with the concept, the assistance of a mentor is especially important. The mentor provides resources, makes suggestions, and offers steady support during the portfolio’s development. In the same way, portfolio models enable administrators to see how others — in different administrative positions — have combined documents and materials into a cohesive whole. (Our book, The Administrative Portfolio, contains 13 actual portfolios that have been developed and used by administrators in different positions and in different institutions across the country.)
  •  5  minutes: Larry
            An alternative to traditional strategic planning. An approach that involves thinking that goes beyond "avoiding mistakes of the past" and "going outside of the box." Author 
            Steven Zaffron's Three Laws of Performance is an alternative planning process that is very well suited to the arts.-Laurence Kaptain 9/16/09 8:33 PM
  • LK NASM Presentation

    1. 1. Basic “shared” version of L. Kaptain’s NASM presentation 112309
    2. 2. Aronica, L., & Robinson, K. (2009). The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything. San Clemente: Tantor Media. Eisner, E. W. (2004). The Arts and the Creation of Mind. New Haven: Yale University Press. Higgerson, M. L., & Seldin, P. (2002). The Administrative Portfolio: A Practical Guide to Improved Administrative Performance and Personnel Decisions (JB - Anker). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Logan, D., & Zaffron, S. (2009). The Three Laws of Performance: Rewriting the Future of Your Organization and Your Life (J- B Warren Bennis Series). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Lombardo. (2009). FYI: For Your Improvement - For Learners, Managers, Mentors, and Feedback Givers. Minneapolis: Lominger Intl.. Pink, D. (2006). A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. Boston: Riverhead Trade. Zander, B., & Zander, R. S. (2002). The Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life. Boston: Penguin (Non-Classics). (Original work published 2002)
    3. 3. Self-Evaluation for the Music Executive: Using a Portfolio Approach to Demonstrate Successful Leadership and Accomplishments NASM San Diego 112309 Ad vocate Ed ucate fo r your your unit boss
    4. 4. mb er 3 Nove 2
    5. 5. Signals? Signposts?
    6. 6. criteria for expectations is often listed in the position announcement, but once the hire is made— evaluative criteria is often vague or absent.
    7. 7. The creation of an administrative portfolio + music executive = show success and accomplishment, the unit.
    8. 8. E ducate you r dean or pr ovost B e eva luated on your terms
    9. 9. Do n’t ask Do
    10. 10. shape position advance unit
    11. 11. Post it on the web Ta ke cha rge of your job and make it your own
    12. 12. Inreach Sue Haug, Penn State
    13. 13. They don’t understand
    14. 14. (photo of standing ovation) They don’t come to our events
    15. 15. (photo of empty auditorium) (Why should they?)
    16. 16. We aren’t on their radar screen (photo of radar installation)
    17. 17. They don’t understand again............
    18. 18. Are they informed about the national arts conversations?
    19. 19. Do they know about Sir Ken Robinson, Benjamin Zander, and Daniel Pink?
    20. 20. Buy them a book!
    21. 21. Do they know about the huge economic impact of the arts on your campus?
    22. 22. In the community?
    23. 23. 1,600,000+
    24. 24. More than the New Orleans Saints or Hornets
    25. 25. Do you send links to TED talks? TED.co m
    26. 26. Do you buy them books?
    27. 27. Alan Fletcher Keynote Address to NASM, November 2008
    28. 28. Obama National Arts Policy Committee, October 2008
    29. 29. America’s artists are the guardians of the spirit of questioning, of innovation, of reaching across the barriers that fence us off from our neighbors, from our allies and adversaries,
    30. 30. from the six billion other people with whom we share this dark and dazzling world.
    31. 31. Art increases the sense of our common humanity.
    32. 32. The imagination of the artist is, therefore, a profoundly moral imagination: the easier it is for you to imagine walking in someone else’s shoes, the more difficult it then becomes to do that person harm.
    33. 33. If you want to make a torturer, first kill his imagination.
    34. 34. If you want to create a nation that will stand by and allow torture to be practiced in its name, then go ahead and kill its imagination, too.
    35. 35. You could start by cutting school funding for art, music, creative writing and the performing arts.
    36. 36. Will you be ready?
    37. 37. (photo of elevator door)
    38. 38. Chancellor, Provost, Dean, governmental, community, philanthropic, artistic leaders
    39. 39. 30 seconds
    40. 40. Do we understand ourselves?
    41. 41. Do we know ourselves?
    42. 42. 1Myers-Briggs® Type Indicator 2Strong 3TKI Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI) 4FIRO® Fundamental Interpersonal Relations OrientationTM 5CPI™ California Psychological Inventory™
    43. 43. https:// www.cpp.com/
    44. 44. Fundamental Interpersonal Relations OrientationTM (FIRO®)
    45. 45. help people understand their behavior—and that of others— in interpersonal situations. part of leadership and coaching, team-building, and conflict management initiatives
    46. 46. 50-yrs. 15 minutes
    47. 47. Practical Tools for Reducing Conflict. The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI) is an assessment for understanding how different conflict- handling styles affect interpersonal and group dynamics.
    48. 48. It’s also a fast and powerful tool that can go beyond conflict management to support your team- building, leadership and coaching, and retention goals.
    49. 49. The TKI measures five “conflict-handling modes,” or ways of dealing with conflict:
    50. 50. competing collaborating compromising avoiding accommodating
    51. 51. two dimensions: assertiveness and cooperativeness
    52. 52. cooperativeness refers to the extent to which one tries to satisfy the concerns of another person
    53. 53. Competing is assertive and not cooperative
    54. 54. accommodating is cooperative and not assertive
    55. 55. Avoiding is neither assertive nor cooperative
    56. 56. collaborating is both assertive and cooperative
    57. 57. Compromising falls in the middle on both dimensions
    58. 58. competing collaborating compromising avoiding accommodating
    59. 59. A personality test that’s not “heavy”
    60. 60. http://www.enneagraminstitute.com
    61. 61. View from the........
    62. 62. Your provost or dean Know their job Know their style
    63. 63. self-evaluation
    64. 64. • Position description (when you were hired) • Personal Statement of Philosophy and Vision for 2009-10 • Evidence of impact on areas of responsibility in the context of position responsibilities. • Other major successes and accomplishments
    65. 65. • 2010-11 Goals (set in June, 2010) • Long-term Goals • Final comments
    66. 66. • What’s the logic behind portfolios? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    67. 67. How is a typical portfolio organized? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    68. 68. How does the administrative portfolio differ from the usual end- of-the-year report to an immediate superior? • Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    69. 69. is the lon g o? H ow rt foli ca lp o t yp i Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    70. 70. How much time does it take to prepare a portfolio Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    71. 71. Don’t all portfolios look alike? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    72. 72. Can an impressive portfolio gloss over weak administrative performance? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Educa
    73. 73. Why would very busy administrato want to take the time and trouble t prepare a portfolio? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    74. 74. To prepare materials about their administrative effectiveness when applying for a new position. Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    75. 75. To seek administrative awards, grants, or merit pay. Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    76. 76. To document for themselves how their administrative style has evolved over time. Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    77. 77. To acquaint their new supervisor with the evolution of the position and the breadth of their activities and accomplishments. Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    78. 78. How do portfolios prompt reflective practice and improvement? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    79. 79. Why is collaboration important in preparing a portfolio?  Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    80. 80. Why are portfolio mentors and models so important to administrators who are preparing their own portfolios? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    81. 81. What is the value of self-reflection in an administrative portfolio? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    82. 82. Small group work
    83. 83. 1) How do you work with faculty members (or chairs or deans) who are struggling in their jobs? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    84. 84. 2) How do you work with students who are academically struggling? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    85. 85. 3) What parts of your administrative position do you handle most (or least) effectively? Why? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    86. 86. 4) What new administrative strategies have you tried in the last year? How successful were they? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    87. 87. 5) What did you learn from the success (or failure) of those new approaches? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    88. 88. 6) What have you learned about yourself as an administrator that needs changing this year? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    89. 89. Report out
    90. 90. 1) How do you work with faculty members (or chairs or deans) who are struggling in their jobs? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    91. 91. 2) How do you work with students who are academically struggling? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    92. 92. 3) What parts of your administrative position do you handle most (or least) effectively? Why? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    93. 93. 4) What new administrative strategies have you tried in the last year? How successful were they? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    94. 94. 5) What did you learn from the success (or failure) of those new approaches? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    95. 95. 6) What have you learned about yourself as an administrator that needs changing this year? Copyright © 2008 - American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    96. 96. 3
    97. 97. 3 Pages Ideas
    98. 98. 2010-11 Goals
    99. 99. 1. Catalyzing the action that will transform... 2. Working with and inspiring faculty... 3. Demonstrating the understanding and ability to provide... 4. Participating as a transformational leader in... 5. Working with the other performing arts deans... 6. Assuring... 7. Expanding... 8. Inspiring and supporting... 9. Confronting directly and transforming any limiting factors into enabling mechanisms for
    100. 100. Bullet-point short-term 2-3 sentences for long-term
    101. 101. 3
    102. 102. Zaffron and Logan set out the Three Laws of Performance as follows:
    103. 103. 1) How people perform correlates to how situations occur to them.
    104. 104. That is, people always act in accordance with the way they explain the world to themselves, which can be quite different from the way the world “really” is.
    105. 105. 2) How a situation occurs arises in language.
    106. 106. That is, language is the vehicle we use to self-create our sense of reality. Zaffron and Logan use “language” in the broadest sense, to include not just words but also nonverbal vehicles such as tone of voice and body language that are used to carry “unsaid but communicated” messages.
    107. 107. 3) Future-based language transforms how situations occur to people.
    108. 108. Here Zaffron and Logan distinguish between descriptive language – the words we use to describe how things are or have been – and generative language – words that describe possible futures, the way things could be.
    109. 109. 1) A complaint that has persisted for some time.
    110. 110. 2) A pattern of behavior that goes along with the complaint (irritated, wronged, disappointment, inability to refrain from complaining)
    111. 111. Complaint and behavior are so entrenched-- folks think: “That’s who they are.”
    112. 112. 3) The payoff for the complaint?
    113. 113. 4) Cost of the behavior
    114. 114. Complaint a disguise for something deeper?
    115. 115. Way to control a situation?
    116. 116. persuade verb [ trans. ] cause (someone) to do something through reasoning or argument : it wasn't easy, but I persuaded him to do the r • [ trans. ] cause (someone) to believe something, esp. after a sustained effort; convince : they must often be p potential severity of their drinking problems | [ trans. ] he did everything he could to persuade the police that he was the robb • (of a situation or event) provide a sound reason for (someone) to do something : the cost of the manor's resto them to take in guests. DERIVATIVES persuadability noun persuadable adjective persuasible adjective ORIGIN late 15th cent.: from Latin persuadere, from per- ‘through, to completion’ + suadere ‘adv USAGE For a discussion of the difference between persuade and convince, see usage at convince .
    117. 117. Recap
    118. 118. succinct manner
    119. 119. read and absorbed by academic
    120. 120. provide valuable information draw positive attention provide a better understanding of the unit needs of the music executive--on his or her own terms.
    121. 121. job performance
    122. 122. On your te rms
    123. 123. Evidence
    124. 124. Goals for the next year
    125. 125. Use their language
    126. 126. Quote and format to fit
    127. 127. Mission
    128. 128. Vision
    129. 129. Values
    130. 130. 3 resources: research on your boss Peter Seldin cpp.com and enneagram
    131. 131. Comments? Questions?
    132. 132. Self-Evaluation for the Music Executive: Using a Portfolio Approach to Demonstrate Successful Leadership and Accomplishments NASM San Diego 112309 Ad vocate Ed ucate fo r your your unit boss
    133. 133. kaptain@lsu.edu Geaux Tigers!!!

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