Blended learning

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Blended learning

  1. 1. November 2009<br />Blended Learning <br />in <br />Higher Education<br />Lauren Kane<br />Educational Developer<br />Flexible Learning Unit<br />College of Engineering and Computer Science<br />Australian National University, Canberra<br />
  2. 2. Blended Learning<br />What it is<br />Research<br />Why it works<br />What it looks like<br />
  3. 3. What it is<br />Online<br />Face-to-face<br />Chat<br />Automation<br />Discussions<br />Lectures<br />Simulations<br />Demonstrations<br />Virtual world<br />One Location<br />Many locations<br />Laboratories<br />
  4. 4. What it is not<br />Add-on<br />Use of technology<br />Time saving exercise<br />
  5. 5. What it is not<br />Add-on<br />Use of technology<br />Time saving exercise<br />
  6. 6. Blended Learning<br /> “Results to date show improved student learning in 19 of the 30 projects, with the remaining 11 showing no significant difference. Other outcomes achieved by the redesigns include increased course completion rates, improved retention, better student attitudes toward the subject matter, and increased student satisfaction with the mode of instruction compared to traditional formats.”<br />Heterick & Twigg, 2003 (as cited in Garrison & Kanuka, 2004)<br />
  7. 7. Blended Learning<br />Face-to-face<br />Blended<br />Online<br />
  8. 8. Blended Learning<br />Learners who took all or part of their class online performed better<br />Blended learning has a larger advantage<br />Different content and learner types<br />Educational online interactions enhance learning<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  9. 9. Blended Learning<br />Learners who took all or part of their class online performed better<br />Blended learning has a larger advantage<br />Different content and learner types<br />Educational online interactions enhance learning<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  10. 10. Blended Learning<br />Learners who took all or part of their class online performed better<br />Blended learning has a larger advantage<br />Different content and learner types<br />Educational online interactions enhance learning<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  11. 11. Blended Learning<br />Learners who took all or part of their class online performed better<br />Blended learning has a larger advantage<br />Different content and learner types<br />Educational online interactions enhance learning<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  12. 12. Blended Learning<br />Learners who took all or part of their class online performed better<br />Blended learning has a larger advantage<br />Different content and learner types<br />Educational online interactions enhance learning<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  13. 13. Why Blend?<br />
  14. 14. Why Blend?<br />Additional ‘on task’ learning time<br />Interactive materials<br />Opportunities for collaboration<br />Reflective elements<br />Improved results across disciplines and learning styles<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  15. 15. Why Blend?<br />Additional ‘on task’ learning time<br />Interactive materials<br />Opportunities for collaboration<br />Reflective elements<br />Improved results across disciplines and learning styles<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  16. 16. Why Blend?<br />Additional ‘on task’ learning time<br />Interactive materials<br />Opportunities for collaboration<br />Reflective elements<br />Improved results across disciplines and learning styles<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  17. 17. Why Blend?<br />Additional ‘on task’ learning time<br />Interactive materials<br />Opportunities for collaboration<br />Reflective elements<br />Improved results across disciplines and learning styles<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  18. 18. Why Blend?<br />Additional ‘on task’ learning time<br />Interactive materials<br />Opportunities for collaboration<br />Reflective elements<br />Improved results across disciplines and learning styles<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  19. 19. Why Blend?<br />Additional ‘on task’ learning time<br />Interactive materials<br />Opportunities for collaboration<br />Reflective elements<br />Improved results across disciplines and learning styles<br />U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development (2009)<br />
  20. 20. What does it look like?<br />
  21. 21. Blended Learning in Action<br />Hubs and Spokes Project<br />
  22. 22. Blended Learning in Action<br />Lectures<br />Presentation of content<br />Tutorials<br />Application and analysis of material<br />Laboratories<br />Hands-on experiments <br />Assessment<br />Written reports, group design project, examinations<br />
  23. 23. Blended Learning in Action<br />Lectures <br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  24. 24. Blended Learning in Action<br />Tutorials<br />http://www.etutors-portal.net/homepage_components/resources/Blendedlearning.jpg<br />
  25. 25. Blended Learning in Action<br />Laboratories<br />
  26. 26. Blended Learning in Action<br />Assessment<br /><ul><li>Lecture quizzes
  27. 27. Reflections
  28. 28. Authentic activities
  29. 29. Collaborative design</li></li></ul><li>Blended Learning in Action<br />Assessment<br /><ul><li>Lecture quizzes
  30. 30. Reflections
  31. 31. Authentic activities
  32. 32. Collaborative design</li></li></ul><li>Blended Learning in Action<br />Assessment<br /><ul><li>Lecture quizzes
  33. 33. Reflections
  34. 34. Authentic activities
  35. 35. Collaborative design</li></li></ul><li>Blended Learning in Action<br />Assessment<br /><ul><li>Lecture quizzes
  36. 36. Reflections
  37. 37. Authentic activities
  38. 38. Collaborative design</li></li></ul><li>Blended Learning in Action<br />Assessment<br /><ul><li>Lecture quizzes
  39. 39. Reflections
  40. 40. Authentic activities
  41. 41. Collaborative design</li></li></ul><li>Blended Learning<br />“the single greatest unrecognised trend in higher education today”<br />Young, 2002 (as cited in Garrison & Kanuka, 2004)<br />
  42. 42. Blended Learning<br />
  43. 43. References<br /><ul><li>Garrison, R. & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended Learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in Higher Education. The Internet and Higher Education, 7, 95-105.
  44. 44. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies, Washington, D.C., 2009. Retrieved October 30, 2009 from: http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/evidence-based-practices/finalreport.pdf</li></li></ul><li>For more Information<br />Dr Kim Blackmore<br />X50411, Ian Ross R223, kim.blackmore@anu.edu.au<br />Lauren Kane<br />X55645, Ian Ross R230, lauren.kane@anu.edu.au<br />Debbie Pioch<br />X58020, Ian Ross R230, debbie.pioch@anu.edu.au<br />

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