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Danish ad association pres

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Presentation by Rick Webb of the Barbarian Group to the Danish Association of Advertising Agencies, at Advertising Week NY, 2010.

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Danish ad association pres

  1. 1. WASSUP DANES. 1
  2. 2. Denmark is awesome. I love that place. 2
  3. 3. So hi! I am Rick I am one of the founders of The Barbarian Group. I live here in New York. 3
  4. 4. So what have we been up to? Just under a year ago, The Barbarian Group sold itself to Cheil Worldwide - a Korean agency network. Since then, we’ve been dilligently chipping away at this whole “agency of the future thing.” 4
  5. 5. We moved our headquarters from Boston to New York and moved into a new office.
  6. 6. We’ve expanded our capabilities to include Social Media and “Products and Services”* * More on that later
  7. 7. We’re formalizing our R&D lab, complete with a physical space.
  8. 8. We’ve grown from 70 employees to about 115.
  9. 9. Boston 19 San Francisco 16 New York City 71 Austin 1 Working from Home Elsewhere 3
  10. 10. And we’ve doubled our 2009 billings* * And made our first-ever profit!
  11. 11. And as of this moment, we currently don’t have a single ad agency as a client.
  12. 12. We’ve also done some pretty awesome work this year.
  13. 13. So. All in all, a good year (despite the economy). Why am I telling you all this?
  14. 14. “Barbarian Group will now be known as Web Banner Group” – An AgencySpy.com Commentor, upon learning of our sale.
  15. 15. I am proud to report we made a total of 3 banners this year.
  16. 16. I confess I am using this occasion to look back on our first year as part of a network.
  17. 17. But i do think it touches on several interesting trends in the industry.
  18. 18. Five interesting trends, in fact. (Because people love lists.)
  19. 19. First: The era of the quick hit viral is over. Okay, it’s not over. But it’s on its way out.
  20. 20. A viral hit is useless in a vacuum. They must be capitalized upon. Amplified.
  21. 21. The plumbing of digital marketing has radically expanded.
  22. 22. The Subservient Chicken - Then 31
  23. 23. If we made the Subservient Chicken Now 32
  24. 24. “A million visits is cool. You know what’s cooler? A billion visits.” (I really hope this preview has been playing in Denmark as much as it’s been playing here.)
  25. 25. We’re not interested in the next big viral hit. We’re interested in transforming businesses, and helping our clients conquer the web. (Viral is just a piece of that.)
  26. 26. Second: Digital advertising is shedding its Madison Avenue complex and looking toward Silicon Valley.
  27. 27. People are leaving Madison Avenue to go to Silicon Valley.
  28. 28. But interestingly, people are leaving Silicon Valley to head to Madison Avenue. (this is probably a bit of an exaggeration.)
  29. 29. And somewhere along the line, sci-fi writers stopped writing about internet companies, and started writing about advertising.
  30. 30. The conversation between the best digital agencies and the hottest tech companies is constant.
  31. 31. (Especially in this town.)
  32. 32. And the digital agencies are learning from all of these conversations. (Even if they haven’t taught their clients yet.)
  33. 33. Sustained execution is the new black. The unglamorous is the new sexy.
  34. 34. Agile is the new campaign.
  35. 35. Let’s look at two examples.
  36. 36. Here’s a site we did for Red Bull. At the time, we told anyone who listened that this was the future.
  37. 37. It’s agile! Iterative! Solves business problems!
  38. 38. The press yawned.
  39. 39. Ditto for Kashi, where in our fourth year, we are coming up on our 1,000,000th registered user.
  40. 40. And the site was recently judged by an outside marketing measurement firm to be more effective than the television spots.
  41. 41. These sites arent’ “sexy.”
  42. 42. These sites aren’t something Madison Avenue would ever have made.
  43. 43. They’re sites Silicon Valley would have made. They’re agile. They’re unsexy. And that’s why they work.
  44. 44. Third: Social is speeding up this transition.
  45. 45. The rise of social media and the disruption it has caused has hastened these changes.
  46. 46. Social has forced clients to think beyond the campaign.
  47. 47. Social is always on. More and more, brands know they need to constntly tend to their social media presence.
  48. 48. A “social media campaign” isn’t an oxymoron yet. But it will be.
  49. 49. And it has begun to wean them from their media agency-instilled delusions that they can replicate broadcast with viral videos.
  50. 50. Even if you don’t do social, thank those weird “social media experts” for speeding up advertising’s digital transition.
  51. 51. Fourth: No agency, model or holding company has an advantage.
  52. 52. Fact is, we’re all trying to be something new. We tout the advantages we have, while scrambling to build or buy our way out of our disadvantages.
  53. 53. The big ad agency is learning digital.
  54. 54. The big ad agency is learning digital. The media company is relearning creative.
  55. 55. The big ad agency is learning digital. The media company is relearning creative. The digital production company is learing strategy and brand.
  56. 56. The big ad agency is learning digital. The media company is relearning creative. The digital production company is learing strategy and brand. The video production company is learning digital.
  57. 57. Everyone is learning: Social
  58. 58. Everyone is learning: Social Mobile
  59. 59. Everyone is learning: Social Mobile Experiential
  60. 60. Everyone is learning: Social Mobile Experiential Word of Mouth
  61. 61. Everyone is learning: Social Mobile Experiential Word of Mouth (Except the social, mobile,experiential and WOM agencies. They’re learning everything else.)
  62. 62. The small agencies are trying to get big.
  63. 63. The small agencies are trying to get big. The big agencies are trying seem smaller.
  64. 64. The small agencies are trying to get big. The big agencies are trying seem smaller. People are leaving big agencies to start small ones.
  65. 65. The small agencies are trying to get big. The big agencies are trying seem smaller. People are leaving big agencies to start small ones. Somehow we’re all global. Even if it’s just a URL.
  66. 66. I hear that you and your band have sold your guitars and bought turntables. I hear that you and your band have sold your turntables and bought guitars. – James Murphy, LCD Soundsytem
  67. 67. There is no agency model of the future.
  68. 68. Or rather, there is only one.
  69. 69. And, like all good things on the Internet, its creation is being crowdsourced. And it’s iterative.
  70. 70. Fifth: The “brand” vs “direct” tension is achieving balance.
  71. 71. Online ad dollars have fluctuated from brand (the banner)...
  72. 72. Online ad dollars have fluctuated from brand (the banner)... ...to direct (AdWord, SEO, eCommerce)...
  73. 73. Online ad dollars have fluctuated from brand (the banner)... ...to direct (AdWord, SEO, eCommerce)... ...and, now, back toward brand (Facebook, social media)
  74. 74. Ad Spend Brand Marketing Direct Marketing 1995 2000 2005 2010
  75. 75. Ad Spend Brand Marketing Direct Marketing 1995 2000 2005 2010 (These numbers are totally made up.)
  76. 76. We used to have the “digital” agency: below the line, direct, search
  77. 77. And we had the “agency of record”: Traditional, brand focused, did some digital. When, you know, it was cool.
  78. 78. Digital is becoming the brand.
  79. 79. Digital is becoming the brand. (Or at least something that shapes the brand.)
  80. 80. So. Yeah. There ya go. Five observations.
  81. 81. If you think about this, this makes sense.
  82. 82. Your brand and your digital presence: Both require constant nurturing.
  83. 83. Brands are made over time.
  84. 84. A great digital presence is made over time.
  85. 85. Both are iterative. Both grow over time.
  86. 86. Campaigns are part of both. But they are not everything.
  87. 87. Thank you.

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