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Worm Composting - Part 1 - Biospheric Project

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Notes from permaculture & worm composting workshop delivered at the Biospheric Foundation in June 2013.

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Worm Composting - Part 1 - Biospheric Project

  1. 1. Permaculture
and
Wormcompos1ng

  2. 2. What
do
we
know
already
about
 Permaculture?

  3. 3. What
is
Permaculture?
 •  Originated
in
Australia
 in
mid
1970s.

 •  Developed
by
Bill
 Mollison
and
David
 Holmgren
around
ideas
 of
stable
agriculture.
 •  “Permaculture
One”
 published
in
1978.

  4. 4. •  Permaculture
combines
 three
key
aspects:
 •  1.
an
ethical
framework.
 •  2.
understandings
of
how
 nature
works.
 •  3.
a
design
approach.
 •  This
unique
combina1on
 is
then
used
to
support
 the
crea1on
of
 sustainable,
produc1ve,
 non‐pollu1ng
and
healthy
 seQlements
/
systems.

  5. 5. Care
of
Earth
 •  Provision
for
all
life
systems
 to
con1nue
and
mul1ply
 •  
Works
with
natural
systems,
 rather
against
them.
 •  Uses
methods
that
have
 minimal
nega1ve
impact
on
 the
Earth’s
natural
 environment.
 •  Designing
and
crea1ng
 healthy
systems
that
meet
 our
needs
without
 damaging
the
planet.

  6. 6. Care
of
People
 •  Provision
for
people
to
 access
those
resources
 necessary
to
their
 existence.
 •  Ensuring
the
wellbeing
of
 both
individuals
and
 communi1es.
 •  
Individuals,
we
need
to
 look
aYer
themselves
and
 each
other
so
that
as
a
 community
they
can
 develop
environmentally
 friendly
lifestyles.

  7. 7. Fair
Shares
 •  By
governing
our
own
needs,
we
can
 set
resources
aside
to
further
the
 above
principles.

 •  Working
to
achieve
a
stable
human
 popula1on,
using
a
number
of
key
 strategies.

 •  Recognise
that:
 •  a.



The
Earth’s
resources
are
limited.
 b.



These
resources
need
to
be
 shared
amongst
many
beings.

 •  Seek
to
divide
these
resources
fairly
 amongst
people,
animals
and
plants
 alike,
not
forge]ng
future
 genera1ons
who
will
need
food,
 water
and
shelter
just
as
much
as
we
 do
now.
 •  
‘One
planet
living'.

  8. 8. What
is
Wormcompos1ng?
 •  Worm
compos1ng
involves
the
 bioxida1ve
degrada1on
of
organic
 wastes
via
the
joint
ac1on
of
earth
 worms
and
microorganisms.

 •  A
form
of
aerobic
compos1ng
that
 involves
the
use
of
specialized
worms
 to
help
break
down
organic
waste
 materials.

 •  Also
known
as
‘vermicompos1ng’.
 •  
Closely
related
to
‘vermiculture’
and
 ‘worm
farming’
–
although
those
 terms
general
imply
a
greater
focus
 on
the
growing
of
the
worms
 themselves,
rather
than
on
the
waste
 processing
and
compost
produc1on
 side
of
the
equa1on.

  9. 9. Why?
 •  A
cooler
(mesophilic)
type
of
compos1ng
‐
a
 hot
compos1ng
stage
not
required
 •  Is
a
‘con1nuous’
compos1ng
process
–
 materials
are
generally
added
on
an
ongoing
 basis,
unlike
the
‘batch
compos1ng’
 approach
used
for
hot
compos1ng
 •  Can
be
done
on
any
scale
–
both
indoors
and
 outdoors
 •  Results
in
an
incredible
compost
 (vermicompost
/
worm
cas1ngs)
with
unique
 plant
growth
promo1on
proper1es
–
at
liQle
 goes
a
long
way!
 •  Doesn’t
require
any
turning
of
material
–
the
 worms
accomplish
this
themselves
 •  Can
handle
more
moisture
(again,
worm
 movement
helps
to
keep
things
aerobic
 •  Mul1ple
yields
–
compost
and
cas1ngs,
 compost
tea,
leachate
plant
feed.
 •  Fast
and
easy
way
to
make
use
of
household
 food
waste.

  10. 10. What
kind
of
worms?
 •  
Eisenia
fe)da
–
the
‘Red
Wiggler’
worm,
also
 known
as
Red
Worms,
Brandling
Worms,
 Manure
Worms,
and
Tiger
Worms
(among
 others)
 •  
This
worm
can
vary
widely
in
terms
of
 colora1on
and
size,
which
helps
to
 •  Prolific
breeder,
and
will
readily
feed
on
a
 wide
range
of
organic
waste
materials

 •  Eat
half
their
own
body
weight
in
waste
each
 day.
 •  Eisenia
hortensis
–a
larger
rela1ve
of
Eisenia
 fe)da
and
has
similar
preferences
and
 requirements.
“Dendra
 •  Viewed
by
researchers
as
inferior
to
the
Red
 Worm
in
a
lot
of
ways.
It
reportedly
has
a
 much
lower
reproduc1ve
rate.
 •  Most
wormeries
contain
a
combina1on
of
the
 two

  11. 11. How
are
Permaculture
principles
 reflected
in
wormcompos1ng?

  12. 12. Where
should
I
put
my
wormery?
 •  Worms
don’t
like
it
too
 hot
or
too
cold‐
keep
 cool
in
summer
and
 warm
in
winter.
 •  Worms
don’t
like
direct
 sunlight.
 •  Worms
don’t
like
to
be
 too
wet
or
too
dry

  13. 13. Any
other
considera1ons?
 •  Neutral
PH
 •  Aerobic
not
anaerobic
 •  Dark
 •  Bedding

  14. 14. What
features
does
a
wormery
need?
 •  Ability
to
keep
worms
 dry.
 •  Ability
to
drain
leachate
 and
preferably
to
save
 it.
 •  Air
flow.
 •  Staighjorward
 harves1ng

  15. 15. What
do
worms
like
to
eat?
 •  YES
PLEASE
 
Vegetables
 Vegetable
Peelings
(Potato
Skins
Take
Ages
to
Rot
Down)
 Onions
 Citrus
Fruits
 Fruit
/
Peel
 Coffee
/
Tea
Bags
 Bread
 Pizza
 Rice
 Pasta
 Flowers
(if
shop
bought
‐
ensure
no
insec1cides
are
 present)
 Cereals
 Crushed
Egg
Shells
 Cakes/
Biscuits
 Sugar
 Cheese
 Cardboard
/
Paper
 Pet
Human
Hair
(this
takes
ages
to
rot
down)
 Hoover
Contents
 Baked
Beans
 Pet
Faeces
(Rabbit
/
Gerbil
Etc)
 Leaves
 
Meat

 ANY
COOKED
FOOD
CAN
ATTRACT
RATS
 •  NO
THANKS
 Bones
 Garlic
 Spicy
Foods
(Curry
etc)
 Eggs
 Dairy
Products
(milk,
yogurt,
buQer)
 Poisonous
Plants
 Insec1cides
/
Pes1cides
 Salt
 Oils
 Non‐
Biodegradable’s
 Solvents
 Soaps
/
Cosme1c
 Grass
/
Lawn
Cu]ngs
(If
Larger
Than
a
Couple
of
 Handfuls
 Weeds
 Chicken
Manure
(Too
High
In
Ammonia)
 Human
Faeces
 Dog
or
cat
dirt

  16. 16. Any
ques1ons?


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