Coiled Serpent , 15th,  e arly 16th century Mexico; Stone
Fruits of Labor , 1932  Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886- 1 957) Lithograph
<ul><li>The Beach (A Praia) ,  1997 </li></ul><ul><li>Beatriz Milhazes  </li></ul><ul><li>Acrylic, metallic paint, metal l...
<ul><li>Merengue en Boca Chica , 1983 </li></ul><ul><li>Rafael Ferrer (American, born Puerto Rico, 1933) </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Head of a Rain God , 10th- 1 1th century Mexico; Maya-Toltec Limestone </li></ul>
<ul><li>Eagle Relief , 10th - 1 3th century
Mexico; Toltec
Andesite/dacite, paint </li></ul>
<ul><li>Vulture Vessel , 15th-  e arly 16th century Mexico; Aztec, Ceramic </li></ul>
Two Flat Stamps , 1st–7th century Costa Rica; Atlantic Watershed Ceramic
Zapata 
 David Alfaro Siqueiros (Mexican, 1896- 1 975)
Lithograph
Rear Guard , 1929 José Clemente Orozco (Mexican, 1883–1949) Lithograph
Frida Khalo Henry Ford Hospital 1932 Oil on metal
Frida Khalo Self-Portrait with Monkey 1938 Oil on Masonite
Frida Khalo Self-Portrait 1940 Oil on canvas
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Latin american art

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  • The Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes fuses modernist styles of painting with the emblems of her cultural heritage. Her abstract compositions are typically layered with imagery, particularly floral designs and ornate circular medallions. Milhazes draws upon local visual traditions as diverse as Baroque colonial art, with the filigree halos of its saints; folk styles of decorative painting on furniture and architecture; and the mass-produced textiles, wallpaper, and ceramic tile of her everyday surroundings. In addition, her brilliant color schemes recall the costumes and parade floats of Carnival, especially as celebrated in Rio de Janeiro, her hometown and the cultural capital of Brazil.Source: Beatriz Milhazes : The Beach (A Praia) (1998.80) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • One of the primary Mesoamerican gods was a rain deity of ancient origin known as Tlaloc by the Aztec peoples of central Mexico. The deity is identifiable by the large goggle eyes and fanged mouth, and in the Precolumbian era such deities were responsible for insuring that there was neither too much nor too little rain, an important and much revered role in every community.Source: Head of a Rain God [Mexico; Maya-Toltec] (1978.412.24) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • The motif is believed to represent an eagle devouring a human heart. In ancient Mexican thought, eagles, souring high into the sky, were symbols of the sun. The sun needed strength to survive the dangerous nightly journey through the darkness of the underworld, and then to rise again each morning. It was the obligation of human beings to provide nourishment for the sun&apos;s journey. That food was in the form of human hearts and blood.Source: Eagle Relief [Mexico; Toltec] (93.27.2) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Ceramic vessels in the form of animal effigies were made in large numbers in many parts of Mexico throughout the Precolumbian era. Often used in ceremonies, the animals selected for depiction were those that played a role in myth. They served as cultural and cosmic metaphors based on their habitat and natural features.Birds generally symbolized the celestial realm and were associated with the sun, moon, and planet Venus; they were also considered messengers between the world of the living and the supernatural sphere. The bird depicted on this handsome tripod vessel, supported by the bird&apos;s legs and tail, probably represents a king vulture ( Sarcoramphus papa ) because of the characteristic fleshy protuberance (now missing) at the base of its beak. Although king vultures feed primarily on carrion, they will occasionally kill for food; they are therefore connected with human sacrifice in ancient Mexican thought. The rendering of the bird includes three significant human aspects: from its projecting &amp;quot;ear&amp;quot; flanges hang pendant ornaments; its talons are shown as hands with prominent thumbs; and its head is adorned with a pleated paper fan often seen on headdresses of Aztec deity figures. The contours of the vessel are well-balanced ム t he lines of the sloping wings echoing the angles of the legs ム a nd the bulging chest of the bird is perfectly centered between its strong legs. The smooth, shiny dark red and black surface creates a pleasing contrast to the rough, matte texture of the head and feet.Source: Vulture Vessel [Mexico; Aztec] (1981.297) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Along with Diego Rivera and Jos � Clemente Orozco, Siqueiros was one of the most important artists in the Mexican mural movement and one of Mexico&apos;s key political figures. With its bold tonal contrasts, this print offers a posthumous representation of Emiliano Zapata (1879 ミ 1 919), the revolutionary leader of Indian ancestry and champion of agrarian reform who fought in the Mexican revolution from 1911 to 1917.Source: David Alfaro Siqueiros : Zapata (31.91.7) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Latin american art

    1. 1. Coiled Serpent , 15th, e arly 16th century Mexico; Stone
    2. 2. Fruits of Labor , 1932 Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886- 1 957) Lithograph
    3. 3. <ul><li>The Beach (A Praia) , 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>Beatriz Milhazes </li></ul><ul><li>Acrylic, metallic paint, metal leaf on canvas </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Merengue en Boca Chica , 1983 </li></ul><ul><li>Rafael Ferrer (American, born Puerto Rico, 1933) </li></ul><ul><li>Oil on canvas </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Head of a Rain God , 10th- 1 1th century Mexico; Maya-Toltec Limestone </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Eagle Relief , 10th - 1 3th century
Mexico; Toltec
Andesite/dacite, paint </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Vulture Vessel , 15th- e arly 16th century Mexico; Aztec, Ceramic </li></ul>
    8. 8. Two Flat Stamps , 1st–7th century Costa Rica; Atlantic Watershed Ceramic
    9. 9. Zapata 
 David Alfaro Siqueiros (Mexican, 1896- 1 975)
Lithograph
    10. 10. Rear Guard , 1929 José Clemente Orozco (Mexican, 1883–1949) Lithograph
    11. 11. Frida Khalo Henry Ford Hospital 1932 Oil on metal
    12. 12. Frida Khalo Self-Portrait with Monkey 1938 Oil on Masonite
    13. 13. Frida Khalo Self-Portrait 1940 Oil on canvas

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