Assets For University Internationalisation

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Assets For University Internationalisation

  1. 1. Creating the assets to support University Internationalisation: Perspectives on achieving quantity, quality and sustainability for Universities in a new competitive and student decision-making environment Stephen Healy, Director, Strategy and Development International Student Mobility Conference Beijing, 19th October 2008
  2. 2. Themes/Outline •  Creating the assets for Universities to genuinely be world class in the new international higher education and globalised world. •  Internationalisation is a strategic and mission imperative for Universities. •  Internationalisation and Brand positioning for Universities. •  The new competitive environment and trends in student decision-making. •  The pressing imperative for Universities delivering on their promise to international students. •  Maintaining/building balance, control and authenticity through a asset based approach. •  Partnerships increasingly important to Brand positioning and competitiveness in internationalisation.
  3. 3. Definition and Clarification •  Asset: A useful or valuable quality, person, or thing; an advantage or resource.
  4. 4. On the lips of everyone and in every University’s strategic plan: •  INTERNATIONALISATION •  THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE
  5. 5. What does Internationalisation mean? •  Quantity in recruitment. •  Quality assurance management: •  Language AND academic ability •  Eliminating guesswork in admissions across markets •  Diversity of nationalities and study disciplines. •  Domestic student mobility. •  Learning and living facilities for international students (often outpaced by recruitment). •  Support and transitioning services for international students. •  Capacity for curriculum development and teaching support for international students.
  6. 6. Interna'onalisa'on:


 Finding
the
right
balance

  7. 7. The Balancing Challenge •  Fulfilling core mission vs. recruitment/revenue drivers. •  Student diversity vs. volume. •  Quantity vs. quality. •  Tailored curriculum vs. Traditional curriculum. •  Teaching and learning vs. independent self study. •  Balancing recruitment with investments across the living and learning facilities on campus. •  Maintaining control and academic integrity of all public and private sector partnerships. •  Delivering the core campus proposition vs. transnational expansion.
  8. 8. Delivering the Internationalisation agenda •  A resource demanding and transformational process. •  More than international student recruitment volumes. •  More than new programmes. •  Investments in staff, domestic student mobility, curriculum, buildings, services, change management etc. •  Beyond nation marketing. •  Building/rebuilding trust and credibility with parents, students, employers and institutional peer groups. •  All above require simultaneous and multiple investments to create new and strengthened University assets in order for there to be authenticity in the proposition.
  9. 9. INTERNATIONALISATION in Higher Education Institutions A GLOBAL THEME OCCURING WITHOUT THE INVESTMENT IN ASSETS TO SUPPORT IT!?
  10. 10. Some of the key assets •  Global Brand: A global Brand presence to ensure diversity and reach in student base and its impact on research. •  Market Intelligence: Awareness and understanding of student trends and demands worldwide and to respond. •  Curriculum: Innovation, reorganisation and accessibility •  Leadership: a commitment to a vision and the change management agenda to achieve it. •  The Service Proposition: responsiveness, programmes and services. •  Facilities for learning and living that reflect a premium price experience. •  Collaboration Processes and Alliance between leading Universities.
  11. 11. Why an Asset approach matters •  Delivering authenticity and the promise to students. •  The student experience: •  Begins before arrival on campus. •  Success depends on academic and non-academic factors. •  Academic credibility will be dampened by living experiences from student interactions, nationality diversity, support services, learning facilities and accommodation. •  Success and a positive experience drives student satisfaction and advocacy – Word of Mouth. •  Avoid ghettos of international students and create the stimuli for domestic student engagement. •  To support the core mission of the University and its relevance to domestic students. •  Universities are not necessarily geared to student service orientated and responsive.
  12. 12. MAKING THE BIG LEAP Breaking Away from the crowd INTO A BRAVE NEW WORLD
  13. 13. Global Higher Education trends •  International student mobility at all time high (2.3million students) and will continue to grow despite significant growth in national capacities and quality. •  Increasing trend towards more bite-sized multi-country mobility - initially driven by cost and study abroad but now by employability and confidence in local systems. •  Cross border provision remains high but student segments changing and narrowing. •  Growing emphasis from employers on international experience NOT JUST qualifications. •  Key growth in mobility will come from Europe and USA through study abroad.
  14. 14. Unprecedented
choice
for
interna'onal 
students…and
the
qualifica'ons
all 
looks
similar!...and
maybe
the 
Universi'es
too! 
 The
need
for
universi'es
to
invest 
in
differen'a'on
and
authen'city. 

  15. 15. Is the currency of the future going to be the qualification or the student experience with a “recognised” university brand? Flickr CC flickr.com/photos/glennharper/486871239/
  16. 16. Delivering
on
the
Promise:
 Mee'ng
student
expecta'ons
and 
aspira'ons…
 
HAS
NEVER
MATTERED
MORE!

  17. 17. What makes a good student experience? •  Rankings are important but… •  The Learning Experience •  Curriculum •  Tutors •  Peers •  A multi-cultural experience - making it an international adventure. •  Friends and networks for life. •  Living and Learning Facilities. •  Career and employment enhancement and support. •  Skills for life as well as academic learning and attainment. •  Services - support and in particular living and learning. integration and the internet access (connecting with home). •  Having expectations exceeded, a remarkable experience and something to talk about!
  18. 18. AND THE CONSISTENT SOURCES OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENT DISSATISFACTION? •  Engagement with Domestic Students •  Diversity of international student mix •  Personal internet access and other services to support individuals •  Feeling of enhanced employability •  Welcome and integration •  Unresponsiveness of University prior to coming to the University
  19. 19. International Student Expectations: A snapshot of their world in the 21st Century •  More demanding and empowered by choice. •  Digital natives. •  More media aware and sceptical. •  Faster to complain and less tolerant of poor service. •  Less loyal – it needs to be earnt and is not automatic. •  Demanding and searching for authenticity. •  Prepared to listen to their peers. •  Experiential. •  Socially aware.
  20. 20. UNRAVELING THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE… The source of future competitiveness and brand positioning quot; Flickr CC flickr.com/photos/candyflossgirl/1131488690/
  21. 21. STUDENT EXPECTATIONS AND PERSONALISATION
  22. 22. THE LITTLE THINGS MATTER ….and will be talked about. Flickr CC flickr.com/photos/97834400@N00/411382971/
  23. 23. Managing the conversations through multiple channels …and it is a two way process
  24. 24. The internationalisation monologue and the risk to trust, credibility and authenticity INTERNATIONALISATION QUALITY THE BEST CHOICE FOR YOU! EMPLOYABLITY STUDENT EXPERIENCE ASSURED PROGRESS COMPARABLE QUALITY EMPLOYABILITY NEW WORLD CLASS WORLD CLASS PROGRAMME IN YOUR CITY OFFSHORE AND BRANCH CAMPUSES
  25. 25. The age of the Dialogue and Authenticity ….. Delivering on the promise has never been more evident!
  26. 26. And will certainly be talked about Slide 0 within web 2.0 China!
  27. 27. NEW SOURCES OF TRUST AND CREDIBILITY Source: Edelman Trust Barometer, 2008
  28. 28. Source: Edelman Trust Barometer, 2008
  29. 29. The forthcoming age of two-way student mobility Flickr CC flickr.com/photos/focht/1975594214
  30. 30. USA Study Abroad Source: Institute of International Education (IIE) available http://opendoors.iienetwork.org/?p=113274 retrieved on 19th November 2007.
  31. 31. USA - Study Abroad Adoption Curve Based on sample responses How well do we understand this group? Data Collection : Synovate Base : Total USA respondents (508) Graphics and Analysis : INTO Knowledge
  32. 32. UK - Study Abroad Adoption Curve How well do we understand this group? Data Collection : Synovate Graphics and Analysis : INTO Knowledge Base : Total UK respondents (505)
  33. 33. Study Abroad Student in the UK: Would you recommend the university to other students thinking of applying here? USA EU Asia Base: USA respondents (600) Base: EU respondents (309) Base: Asia respondents (1,562) Data Collection : i – graduate, 2007/08, Sept-July Graphics and Analysis : INTO Knowledge
  34. 34. Study abroad students in the UK: student satisfaction across a basket of factors
  35. 35. Study Abroad Programs by Provider. Destination -London The Brand Premium!
  36. 36. More than a theory… real experience in practice
  37. 37. A focus on transformation and the student experience through partnerships
  38. 38. What is INTO? •  Vision: The global education partners for leading Universities committed to authenticity in their internationalisation •  Mission: Transforming the international student experience on the campuses of leading universities in the world “INTO has at its heart a joint venture. What you get ideally is a win-win between the strong university brand and a strong and very knowledgeable, sympathetic private sector partner.” Professor David Eastwood: Chief Executive, Higher Education Funding Council England.
  39. 39. INTO’s University partners 2006‐08:

First
partner 
University
of
East
Anglia,
UK 
with
Academic
pathways
base 
of
45
interna>onal
students 
from
21
countries
 2008:
Over
2,900
interna>onal 
pathway
students
from
74 
countries
across
5
UK
University 
Partners
 2008:

Sixth
partner
Oregon 
State
University
and
first
in
USA 
with
first
of
its
kinds
State 
University
Campus
academic 
and
language
pathway 
programmes
in
USA.
 By
2012,
16
partners
in
6 
Countries
and
20,000
students 
mobile
within
the
network

  40. 40. GeXng
the
right
ingredients
and
balance
for 
success:

It
is
different
for
every
university!

  41. 41. INTO Partnership Ingredients •  Brand: A focus on building University Brands (not INTO) •  Student Experience: A leading edge student experience from first day of awareness to graduation •  Partnerships: Deeply embedded long-term partnership over a 35 years driving a strategic perspective from all parties. •  Global Reach: Global sales and marketing infrastructure •  Facilities: World class facilities for living and learning •  Programmes: University leadership and control of academic content and quality. •  Services: Central admissions and a focus on student responsiveness and personalisation from first enquiry to campus graduation. •  A like-minded Global Alliance: 16 partnerships in 6 countries by 2012 facilitating the mobility of 22,000 students worldwide by 2015.
  42. 42. Pathways curricula for internationalisation •  Preparation for success and managed quality in international students. •  Quality management on campus and not assured remotely •  Assured Quality into mainstream degree programmes •  Addresses the lack of consistency and direct comparability in overseas education systems and teaching cultures. •  Managing language development and broad spectrum of test scores versus actual ability •  Student transition into new culture and academic environment
  43. 43. INTIAL TAKE OFF AND TRAJECTORY: UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA THE INTO PARTNERSHIP IMPACT. (NOTE: RECRUTIMENT VOLUMES TO CAPACITY AT UEA)
  44. 44. Collective Channel Reach and Brand Resonance: from student satisfaction to advocacy
  45. 45. Some Outcomes in INTO partners •  Quantity: Transformational increases in international student enrolments in pathways. •  Brand Profile: Transformation in direct high quality enrolments. •  The Student Experience: Increases in student satisfaction and more importantly advocacy. •  Institutional Collaboration: joint promotion and curriculum sharing and recognition. •  Quality: Increasing direct entry standards as grey area students move into pathways AND pathway students outperforming students admitted directly in subsequent years. •  Facilities: New living and learning facilities in the heart of the campus. •  Domestic Student Engagement: New campus internationalisation and engagement strategies and growth in study abroad. •  Sustainability: Internationalisation built around asset and brand building and diversity in global presence.
  46. 46. In Summary •  Students will demand Internationalisation to mean more than volume recruitment as standards and quality continues to rise. •  The best University brands will be those delivering more than just recruitment and will be focused on improving their core campus provision and support/engagement services. •  The student experience and delivering on the promise never more important - authenticity matters! •  To meet this agenda, Universities need to explore internationalisation through a comprehensive development and investment strategy that looks at all its assets…and assess if can they do it on their own. •  INTO University Partnerships tries to support Universities worldwide in meeting this agenda by empowering Universities to develop assets to support internationalisation and ultimately Brand profile through a unique partnership model.
  47. 47. Thank You for Listening! If you wish, you can download this presentation at www.into-knowledge.com

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