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  1. 1. Little Bookham Preschool Inspection report for early years provision Unique reference number EY438717 Inspect ion date 11/07/2012 Inspector Catherine Greenwood Setting address All Saints Church Hall, Manor House Lane, Bookham, LEAT HERHEAD, Surrey, KT23 4EL Telephone number 07930 127 467 Email littlebookhampreschool@gmail.com Type of setting Childcare - Non-Domestic
  2. 2. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family Court Advisory Suppor t Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure establishments. It assesses council children’s ser vices, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection. If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille, please telephone 0300 123 1231, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk. You may copy all or parts of this document for non-commercial educational pur poses, as long as you give details of the source and date of publication and do not alter the infor mation in any way. T: 0300 123 1231 Textphone: 0161 618 8524 E: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk W: www.ofsted.gov.uk © Crown copyright 2012 2
  3. 3. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Introduction This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under Sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006 on the quality and standards of the registered early years provision. ‘Early years provision’ refers to provision regulated by Ofsted for children from birth to 31 August following their fifth birthday (the early years age group). The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the statutory framework for children’s learning, development and welfare, known as the Early Years Foundation Stage. The provider must provide a copy of this report to all parents with children at the setting where reasonably practicable. The provider must provide a copy of the report to any other person who asks for one, but may charge a fee for this service (The Childcare (Inspection) Regulations 2008 regulations 9 and 10). Children only attend this setting before and/or after the school day and/or during the school holidays. The judgements in this report reflect the quality of early years provision offered to children during those periods. The setting also makes provision for children older than the early years age group which is registered on the voluntary and/or compulsory part(s) of the Childcare Register. This report does not include an evaluation of that provision, but a comment about compliance with the requirements of the Childcare Register is included in Annex B. Please see our website for more information about each childcare provider. We publish inspection reports, conditions of registration and details of complaints we receive where we or the provider take action to meet the requirements of registration. 3 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  4. 4. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Description of the setting Little Bookham Preschool registered in 2012 and is privately owned. It operates from All Saints Church Hall, in Little Bookham, Surrey. The premises have two floors, with a room on each floor. There is an integral kitchenette, accessible toilets and a small enclosed outdoor play area adjacent to the front entrance. The preschool also has sole use of an enclosed field for outdoor play. Children aged three and four years are funded for free early education. The preschool is registered on the Early Years Register and the compulsory part of the Childcare Register to care for no more than 14 children under eight years at any one time. These children may all be in the early years age group, although none may be aged under two years. There are currently 20 children on roll, all of whom attend part time. Three members of staff work with the children. All three are registered providers of the setting. The manager and one deputy hold BA (Hons) degrees in early years and the second deputy manager holds an appropriate level 3 qualification. The preschool operates Monday and Thursday from 9am to 5pm, and Tuesday and Wednesday from 1pm to 4pm, term-time only. A holiday club is provided for children who attend the preschool and their siblings aged two to under eight years. This club runs for two weeks during the summer holidays on Mondays and Thursdays from 9am to 2pm, and on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 1pm to 4pm. The provision receives support from the local authority and is currently completing their quality assurance programme. The overall effectiveness of the early years provision Overall the quality of the provision is good. Children thrive in a warm, welcoming and stimulating environment. Staff give top priority to meeting their individual needs through effective partnership with parents, schools and other early years provision. Their ability to make learning fun and exciting means that children are happy and motivated as they play and make outstanding learning and developmental progress. Overall, children interact with a wide range of resources to support their learning, and take part in interesting experiences that include frequent outings within the local community. Staff make effective use of self-evaluation processes and action plans to drive and maintain continuous improvement, clearly identifying areas for future improvements to enhance outcomes for children. What steps need to be taken to improve provision further? To further improve the early years provision the registered person should: increase opportunities for children to use information and communication 4 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  5. 5. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 technology, for example, by extending the range of programmable toys to fully develop future skills and support their learning. The effectiveness of leadership and management of the early years provision Staff fully understand their responsibilities to safeguard children's welfare. There are clear vetting procedures in place to identify that all staff working with children are suitable to do so. Children's safety is well maintained through the use of comprehensive risk assessments for the premises and all outings. These include specific information, for example, where younger children may need increased supervision and support based on their age and levels of understanding. Staff invite parents to attend outings, which helps to improve ratios of adults to children and ensures that children are well supervised. Self-evaluation is good. Staff give careful consideration to the strengths and most weaknesses of the provision and identify future aims and objectives that will improve outcomes for children. All staff have recently attended training on the revised Early Years Foundation Stage, delivered by the local authority. This has led to the adaptation of children's observation and assessment records. All staff have attended training on engaging parents in children's learning. Consequently, parents have become more involved in contributing observations of their children's learning at home. Since registration, the preschool have enrolled in a local authority quality assurance improvement scheme. This has enabled them to create focused improvement plans through consultation with children and parents. Children are provided with a nurturing, welcoming and well resourced environment that successfully promotes their learning, both indoors and outdoors. Staff work well as a team to communicate effectively with children and make good use of equipment to sustain children's interest and enthusiasm during their play. They introduce additional resources that capture children's interest and support them with using these successfully. Staff adapt the room layout to provide areas that promote children's concentration and ability to focus. Children have good opportunities to learn about diversity as they make use of play equipment that reflects positive images. Staff plan activities that challenge children's thinking and help them to embrace cultural differences. For example, they celebrate Chinese New Year by making vegetable stir fries for snack time and listen to related stories. Children take part in Easter Church services and make flags to celebrate American Independence Day. Partnerships are good. Staff visit local schools before children leave the preschool to share their progress records and support transition processes. They also regularly liaise with other early years provision that children attend. Consequently, children are provided with continuity in their care and learning. Staff communicate with parents in a friendly and positive way and share information about the activities and resources that children enjoy. Parents are asked to share activity ideas and have recently taken part in preschool celebrations and outings. Parents are provided with good information about their children and the preschool through 5 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  6. 6. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 regular e-mails and a web-site. The quality and standards of the early years provision and outcomes for children Children make excellent progress in relation to their developmental starting points. They are fully included in all aspects of the provision because staff fully embrace their individuality. Staff dedicate their time to providing a wide range of activities that capture children's interest. The opportunities for children to make independent choices during their play and the observant and supportive approach of staff significantly enhance children's learning and development. Staff make excellent use of observation and assessment to plan activities that are tailored to the needs and abilities of individual children. Consequently, children show enthusiasm for everything on offer and feel fully valued as staff consistently respond to their individual interests. Staff consult with children and embrace their ideas. This can be seen as children suggest making an aeroplane with small chairs and using real suitcases to pretend to pack their belongings. Children are offered a wide range of enjoyable and challenging experiences across the areas of learning. For example, they visit the local bakers to buy doughnuts, which they eat as a special treat in the park on the way back from the library. Children are extremely well behaved because staff are exceptionally respectful and considerate in their approach. As a result, children are provided with extremely good role models. Staff make very good use of reward systems to encourage children to be kind and help others. Children are encouraged to take make decisions and choices within their play. This can be seen as staff support them with achieving their aims and make suggestions that inspire and motivate them within all activities. Children show extremely good self-help skills, as they help to prepare and serve themselves snacks and clear away and wash up their dishes. They enjoy the involvement of others in their play and develop very positive and caring relationships. Children show excellent listening skills and smile with pleasure as staff talk about previous experiences; for example, a rabbit they saw outside the provision. Staff make exceptional use of opportunities to ask children questions that are related to their individual interests. Consequently, children show confidence as they engage in conversation and say what they know and understand. For example, while talking about previous and forthcoming holidays, children talk about how they are going to get to the airport. Children concentrate well while listening to stories and ask staff questions to clarify their thinking. They have exceptional opportunities to develop an understanding of the world. For example, they see eggs incubating and hatching during outings to a local garden centre, plant seeds in the preschool vegetable patch and visit the local greengrocers to choose, weigh and buy vegetables. Children make 'forest people' from clay, hide them in woodland areas and remember where they have hidden them on the next visit. They take part in 'bear hunts' and discover bugs under logs. Children walk through overgrown woodland areas while wearing wellington boots and using play swords as part of a 'jungle hunt'. Children are encouraged to notice changes and sounds within the environment. For example, when there is heavy hail outside, children collect the 6 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  7. 7. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 hailstones in their hands, talk about how this feels and notice them melting. Since registration, staff have ordered some programmable toys, although children do not currently have access to a wide range of information communication and technology equipment, such as computers, to make good use of everyday technology and fully develop their skills for the future. Children run freely in local fields and use a range of outdoor equipment that develops their physical control. For example, they learn to use stilts, crawl through play tunnels and tents, use stepping stones and particularly enjoy using an air propelled rocket. Children manipulate and roll modelling dough and use cutters with increasing control to make creations, such as pretend cakes and hotdogs. They enjoy using small world toys and develop their creativity, as they take part in cooking activities, puppet shows and paint freely at an easel. Children learn about their own safety, as they help staff to check fire equipment, visit the fire station and take part in evacuation practices. Children enjoy healthy snacks that include food from around the world, such as different types of bread. They are protected from the risk of cross infection as they learn to wash their hands at appropriate times. 7 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  8. 8. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Annex A: record of inspection judgements The key inspection judgements and what they mean Grade 1 is Outstanding: this aspect of the provision is of exceptionally high quality Grade 2 is Good: this aspect of the provision is strong Grade 3 is Satisfactory: this aspect of the provision is sound Grade 4 is Inadequate: this aspect of the provision is not good enough The overall effectiveness of the early years provision How well does the setting meet the needs of the 2 children in the Early Years Foundation Stage? The capacity of the provision to maintain continuous 2 improvement The effectiveness of leadership and management of the early years provision The effectiveness of leadership and management of the 2 Early Years Foundation Stage The effectiveness of leadership and management in embedding 2 ambition and driving improvement The effectiveness with which the setting deploys resources 2 The effectiveness with which the setting promotes equality and 2 diversity The effectiveness of safeguarding 2 The effectiveness of the setting’s self-evaluation, including the 2 steps taken to promote improvement The effectiveness of partnerships 2 The effectiveness of the setting’s engagement with parents and 2 carers The quality of the provision in the Early Years Foundation Stage The quality of the provision in the Early Years Foundation Stage 1 Outcomes for children in the Early Years Foundation Stage Outcomes for children in the Early Years Foundation 1 Stage The extent to which children achieve and enjoy their learning 1 The extent to which children feel safe 2 The extent to which children adopt healthy lifestyles 2 The extent to which children make a positive contribution 1 The extent to which children develop skills for the future 2 Any complaints about the inspection or report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance available from Ofsted’s website: www.ofsted.gov.uk 8 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  9. 9. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Annex B: the Childcare Register The provider confirms that the requirements of the Met compulsory part of the Childcare Register are: 9 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006

Transcript

  1. 1. Little Bookham Preschool Inspection report for early years provision Unique reference number EY438717 Inspect ion date 11/07/2012 Inspector Catherine Greenwood Setting address All Saints Church Hall, Manor House Lane, Bookham, LEAT HERHEAD, Surrey, KT23 4EL Telephone number 07930 127 467 Email littlebookhampreschool@gmail.com Type of setting Childcare - Non-Domestic
  2. 2. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family Court Advisory Suppor t Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure establishments. It assesses council children’s ser vices, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection. If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille, please telephone 0300 123 1231, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk. You may copy all or parts of this document for non-commercial educational pur poses, as long as you give details of the source and date of publication and do not alter the infor mation in any way. T: 0300 123 1231 Textphone: 0161 618 8524 E: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk W: www.ofsted.gov.uk © Crown copyright 2012 2
  3. 3. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Introduction This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under Sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006 on the quality and standards of the registered early years provision. ‘Early years provision’ refers to provision regulated by Ofsted for children from birth to 31 August following their fifth birthday (the early years age group). The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the statutory framework for children’s learning, development and welfare, known as the Early Years Foundation Stage. The provider must provide a copy of this report to all parents with children at the setting where reasonably practicable. The provider must provide a copy of the report to any other person who asks for one, but may charge a fee for this service (The Childcare (Inspection) Regulations 2008 regulations 9 and 10). Children only attend this setting before and/or after the school day and/or during the school holidays. The judgements in this report reflect the quality of early years provision offered to children during those periods. The setting also makes provision for children older than the early years age group which is registered on the voluntary and/or compulsory part(s) of the Childcare Register. This report does not include an evaluation of that provision, but a comment about compliance with the requirements of the Childcare Register is included in Annex B. Please see our website for more information about each childcare provider. We publish inspection reports, conditions of registration and details of complaints we receive where we or the provider take action to meet the requirements of registration. 3 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  4. 4. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Description of the setting Little Bookham Preschool registered in 2012 and is privately owned. It operates from All Saints Church Hall, in Little Bookham, Surrey. The premises have two floors, with a room on each floor. There is an integral kitchenette, accessible toilets and a small enclosed outdoor play area adjacent to the front entrance. The preschool also has sole use of an enclosed field for outdoor play. Children aged three and four years are funded for free early education. The preschool is registered on the Early Years Register and the compulsory part of the Childcare Register to care for no more than 14 children under eight years at any one time. These children may all be in the early years age group, although none may be aged under two years. There are currently 20 children on roll, all of whom attend part time. Three members of staff work with the children. All three are registered providers of the setting. The manager and one deputy hold BA (Hons) degrees in early years and the second deputy manager holds an appropriate level 3 qualification. The preschool operates Monday and Thursday from 9am to 5pm, and Tuesday and Wednesday from 1pm to 4pm, term-time only. A holiday club is provided for children who attend the preschool and their siblings aged two to under eight years. This club runs for two weeks during the summer holidays on Mondays and Thursdays from 9am to 2pm, and on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 1pm to 4pm. The provision receives support from the local authority and is currently completing their quality assurance programme. The overall effectiveness of the early years provision Overall the quality of the provision is good. Children thrive in a warm, welcoming and stimulating environment. Staff give top priority to meeting their individual needs through effective partnership with parents, schools and other early years provision. Their ability to make learning fun and exciting means that children are happy and motivated as they play and make outstanding learning and developmental progress. Overall, children interact with a wide range of resources to support their learning, and take part in interesting experiences that include frequent outings within the local community. Staff make effective use of self-evaluation processes and action plans to drive and maintain continuous improvement, clearly identifying areas for future improvements to enhance outcomes for children. What steps need to be taken to improve provision further? To further improve the early years provision the registered person should: increase opportunities for children to use information and communication 4 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  5. 5. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 technology, for example, by extending the range of programmable toys to fully develop future skills and support their learning. The effectiveness of leadership and management of the early years provision Staff fully understand their responsibilities to safeguard children's welfare. There are clear vetting procedures in place to identify that all staff working with children are suitable to do so. Children's safety is well maintained through the use of comprehensive risk assessments for the premises and all outings. These include specific information, for example, where younger children may need increased supervision and support based on their age and levels of understanding. Staff invite parents to attend outings, which helps to improve ratios of adults to children and ensures that children are well supervised. Self-evaluation is good. Staff give careful consideration to the strengths and most weaknesses of the provision and identify future aims and objectives that will improve outcomes for children. All staff have recently attended training on the revised Early Years Foundation Stage, delivered by the local authority. This has led to the adaptation of children's observation and assessment records. All staff have attended training on engaging parents in children's learning. Consequently, parents have become more involved in contributing observations of their children's learning at home. Since registration, the preschool have enrolled in a local authority quality assurance improvement scheme. This has enabled them to create focused improvement plans through consultation with children and parents. Children are provided with a nurturing, welcoming and well resourced environment that successfully promotes their learning, both indoors and outdoors. Staff work well as a team to communicate effectively with children and make good use of equipment to sustain children's interest and enthusiasm during their play. They introduce additional resources that capture children's interest and support them with using these successfully. Staff adapt the room layout to provide areas that promote children's concentration and ability to focus. Children have good opportunities to learn about diversity as they make use of play equipment that reflects positive images. Staff plan activities that challenge children's thinking and help them to embrace cultural differences. For example, they celebrate Chinese New Year by making vegetable stir fries for snack time and listen to related stories. Children take part in Easter Church services and make flags to celebrate American Independence Day. Partnerships are good. Staff visit local schools before children leave the preschool to share their progress records and support transition processes. They also regularly liaise with other early years provision that children attend. Consequently, children are provided with continuity in their care and learning. Staff communicate with parents in a friendly and positive way and share information about the activities and resources that children enjoy. Parents are asked to share activity ideas and have recently taken part in preschool celebrations and outings. Parents are provided with good information about their children and the preschool through 5 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  6. 6. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 regular e-mails and a web-site. The quality and standards of the early years provision and outcomes for children Children make excellent progress in relation to their developmental starting points. They are fully included in all aspects of the provision because staff fully embrace their individuality. Staff dedicate their time to providing a wide range of activities that capture children's interest. The opportunities for children to make independent choices during their play and the observant and supportive approach of staff significantly enhance children's learning and development. Staff make excellent use of observation and assessment to plan activities that are tailored to the needs and abilities of individual children. Consequently, children show enthusiasm for everything on offer and feel fully valued as staff consistently respond to their individual interests. Staff consult with children and embrace their ideas. This can be seen as children suggest making an aeroplane with small chairs and using real suitcases to pretend to pack their belongings. Children are offered a wide range of enjoyable and challenging experiences across the areas of learning. For example, they visit the local bakers to buy doughnuts, which they eat as a special treat in the park on the way back from the library. Children are extremely well behaved because staff are exceptionally respectful and considerate in their approach. As a result, children are provided with extremely good role models. Staff make very good use of reward systems to encourage children to be kind and help others. Children are encouraged to take make decisions and choices within their play. This can be seen as staff support them with achieving their aims and make suggestions that inspire and motivate them within all activities. Children show extremely good self-help skills, as they help to prepare and serve themselves snacks and clear away and wash up their dishes. They enjoy the involvement of others in their play and develop very positive and caring relationships. Children show excellent listening skills and smile with pleasure as staff talk about previous experiences; for example, a rabbit they saw outside the provision. Staff make exceptional use of opportunities to ask children questions that are related to their individual interests. Consequently, children show confidence as they engage in conversation and say what they know and understand. For example, while talking about previous and forthcoming holidays, children talk about how they are going to get to the airport. Children concentrate well while listening to stories and ask staff questions to clarify their thinking. They have exceptional opportunities to develop an understanding of the world. For example, they see eggs incubating and hatching during outings to a local garden centre, plant seeds in the preschool vegetable patch and visit the local greengrocers to choose, weigh and buy vegetables. Children make 'forest people' from clay, hide them in woodland areas and remember where they have hidden them on the next visit. They take part in 'bear hunts' and discover bugs under logs. Children walk through overgrown woodland areas while wearing wellington boots and using play swords as part of a 'jungle hunt'. Children are encouraged to notice changes and sounds within the environment. For example, when there is heavy hail outside, children collect the 6 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  7. 7. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 hailstones in their hands, talk about how this feels and notice them melting. Since registration, staff have ordered some programmable toys, although children do not currently have access to a wide range of information communication and technology equipment, such as computers, to make good use of everyday technology and fully develop their skills for the future. Children run freely in local fields and use a range of outdoor equipment that develops their physical control. For example, they learn to use stilts, crawl through play tunnels and tents, use stepping stones and particularly enjoy using an air propelled rocket. Children manipulate and roll modelling dough and use cutters with increasing control to make creations, such as pretend cakes and hotdogs. They enjoy using small world toys and develop their creativity, as they take part in cooking activities, puppet shows and paint freely at an easel. Children learn about their own safety, as they help staff to check fire equipment, visit the fire station and take part in evacuation practices. Children enjoy healthy snacks that include food from around the world, such as different types of bread. They are protected from the risk of cross infection as they learn to wash their hands at appropriate times. 7 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  8. 8. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Annex A: record of inspection judgements The key inspection judgements and what they mean Grade 1 is Outstanding: this aspect of the provision is of exceptionally high quality Grade 2 is Good: this aspect of the provision is strong Grade 3 is Satisfactory: this aspect of the provision is sound Grade 4 is Inadequate: this aspect of the provision is not good enough The overall effectiveness of the early years provision How well does the setting meet the needs of the 2 children in the Early Years Foundation Stage? The capacity of the provision to maintain continuous 2 improvement The effectiveness of leadership and management of the early years provision The effectiveness of leadership and management of the 2 Early Years Foundation Stage The effectiveness of leadership and management in embedding 2 ambition and driving improvement The effectiveness with which the setting deploys resources 2 The effectiveness with which the setting promotes equality and 2 diversity The effectiveness of safeguarding 2 The effectiveness of the setting’s self-evaluation, including the 2 steps taken to promote improvement The effectiveness of partnerships 2 The effectiveness of the setting’s engagement with parents and 2 carers The quality of the provision in the Early Years Foundation Stage The quality of the provision in the Early Years Foundation Stage 1 Outcomes for children in the Early Years Foundation Stage Outcomes for children in the Early Years Foundation 1 Stage The extent to which children achieve and enjoy their learning 1 The extent to which children feel safe 2 The extent to which children adopt healthy lifestyles 2 The extent to which children make a positive contribution 1 The extent to which children develop skills for the future 2 Any complaints about the inspection or report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance available from Ofsted’s website: www.ofsted.gov.uk 8 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006
  9. 9. Inspection Report: Little Bookham Preschool, 11/07/2012 Annex B: the Childcare Register The provider confirms that the requirements of the Met compulsory part of the Childcare Register are: 9 This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006

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