Week 4 english 145 (1)

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  • Internet is anarchy. Eveyone knows that you have to be vigilant about trusting the accuracy, balance and relibility of web documents. Studdntsusuaklyl have hard times asessing the reliability of internet sources. Web documents deserve special attention.
  • Week 4 english 145 (1)

    1. 1. English 145<br />Week 4<br />
    2. 2. Agenda<br />A quick review of what we have achieved for the last four weeks<br />Going Over last week’s topic: Evaluating sources<br />Curious Researcher Activity<br />How to write Introductions. Getting started to your Social action Projects<br />Workshop on Introductions<br />Writing Annotated Bibliographies (if time allows)<br />Reminder: If you have not signed in for a discussion facilitation, please do so today. The sign-up sheet is on my door.<br />Note: There is a chance in my office hours today due to a meeting.<br />
    3. 3. How to access the reliability of online sources? <br />Always keep your purpose in mind.<br />Favor educational and governmental sources over commercial ones. <br />Favor authored documents over those without authors.<br />Favor documents that are available in print over those only available online<br />Favor web pages that have been recently updated.<br />Favor web sources that documents their claims over those that don’t.<br />
    4. 4. Evaluating your sources<br />1. Authority What are the author's qualifications? Is the document written on a topic in the author's area of expertise? Is the author affiliated with an institution? <br />2. Accuracy Does the article cite its sources? Are the conclusions justified and supported by evidence? Is the information reliable and free of error? <br />3. Comprehensiveness Are the topics explored in depth? Does the information appear to be valid and well-researched? Does the work update other sources? Is the information useful or repetitious? <br />4. Validity Does the author inform or persuade? Is the language free of emotion-rousing words or bias? Does the author express a particular point of view? <br />5. Ease of use Is the resource organized logically? Are the main points clearly presented? <br />
    5. 5. What we have worked on so far…<br />Opened a blog account and worked on the followings: Posted entries on CR exercises, worked on Social Diversity narrative, Free-writing on social Action Projects.<br />Defined what we mean by social action and social privilege.<br />Brainstormed action research topics for the SAPs<br />Formed ‘Researchable” and “Meaningful” research questions.<br />Learned how to evaluate sources.<br />Began the library search and conducted preliminary library research. <br />Met with a librarian and went over some important library search engines.<br />
    6. 6. Could you clarify Mr./Ms. Ziegler?<br />
    7. 7. What sections do you normally see in a research article?<br />
    8. 8. Social Action project sections <br />ABSTRACT<br />INTRODUCTION<br />LITERATURE REVIEW<br />METHODOLOGY<br />DATA ANALYSIS<br />RESULTS<br />CONCLUSION/DISCUSSION<br />REFERENCES<br />
    9. 9. Introduction<br />Include your thesis statement and research questions.<br />Indicate the significance of this study. Who should care about your research?<br />Tell your readers what the purpose of your research study is .<br />Open your paragraph with an attention grabber. It could be some statistical information, a question, quote or an anecdote. This will make your reader interested in your research and will make them want to read your paper.<br />Put yourself in your readers’ shoes. Remember the audience issue we discussed last week. What background information do you think your readers need to know to understand your research?<br />In your introduction you can also include some of your literature.<br />
    10. 10. Thinking about the “Introduction” of your research projects<br />Starting a paper is often the most difficult part of the research papers. It is crucial to ask these tow questions:<br />What is the purpose of this research?<br />Who cares about this? What is the significance?<br />Who is my audience?<br />
    11. 11. Proofreading <br />Please proofread your introductions before you hand it in on Monday…<br />You tube video:<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OonDPGwAyfQ<br />
    12. 12. Agenda (9/16)<br />Preparing for peer-review—TRUST LEAN!<br />Peer-Editing Workshop<br />Peer-Review of your Introductions<br />Turn in your Intros with your peer-reviewer’s comments<br />Annotated Bibliographies<br />Talking about Discussion Facilitations<br />
    13. 13. Trust Lean<br />Find a partner of similar height and weight.<br />One person will be the Faller and two will be Catchers.<br />Faller must standing upright, feet together hands across chest, resting on shoulders, keep body stiff.<br />Catchers must have one leg in front of the other, arms extended,<br />Both parties must establish clear communication calls:<br />Faller: "I am ready to fall. Are you ready to catch me?"<br />Catcher: "I am ready to catch you. Fall away."<br />Faller: "Falling."<br />Catcher: "OK”<br />
    14. 14. Trust Lean Discussion<br />What made you feel trusting? (e.g., clear communication, positive encouragement, etc.)<br />What made you feel less trusting (e.g., laughing/joking, lack of communication, etc.)<br />
    15. 15. Trust-Lean: Peer-Editing, Peer-Writing, Peer-Reviewing<br />You need to trust your partner<br />You need to communicate clearly<br />You need to be open and flexible in your editing process<br />You need to be ready to negotiate<br />
    16. 16. What is a summary?<br />
    17. 17. What is a summary?<br />A reduction of a longer material into some brief statements<br />The gist of what an article or a book is about.<br />Emphasizing the key parts of a larger source because it fits your SAPs purpose.<br />Graf and Birkenstain (2010) state “Writing a good summary means not just representing an author’s view accurately, but doing so in a way that fits your own composition’s larger agenda” (p.36)<br />What is important about what the writer tells?<br />How does the author’s ideas fit in with what YOU want to say?<br />
    18. 18. The art of summarizing (article on digital reserve)<br />WHAT VERBS DO YOU USE FOR INTRODUCING SUMMARIES?<br />WHAT VERBS DO YOU USE FOR EXPRESSING AGREEMENT?<br />WHAT VERBS DO YOU USE FOR MAKING RECOMMENDATIONS?<br />
    19. 19. Summary Practice<br />EXERCISE 3.4 : Read the passage and write a brief summary of the author’s main points. Make sure that you use your own words. If you are borrowing any words or phrases from the author, make sure that you use quotation marks.<br />
    20. 20. Annotated Bibliography—summarizing articles dealing with your SAPs topics<br />A bibliography is a list of sources (books, journals, websites, periodicals, etc.) one has used for researching a topic. Bibliographies are sometimes called "references" or "works cited" depending on the style format you are using.<br />An annotation is a summary and/or evaluation.<br />Therefore, an annotated bibliography includes a summary and/or evaluation of each of the sources. Depending on your project or the assignment, your annotations may do one or more of the following:<br />
    21. 21. Your annotated Bibliographies should include:<br />Summary: What are the main arguments? What is the point of this book or article? What topics are covered? If someone asked what this article/book is about, what would you say? The length of your annotations will determine how detailed your summary is.<br />Reflection: Once you've summarized a source, you need to ask how it fits into your research. Was this source helpful to you? How does it help you shape your argument? How can you use this source in your research project? Has it changed how you think about your topic? <br />
    22. 22. Apa style referencing <br />Articles:<br />Lee, G. (2009). Speaking up: Six Korean students’ oral participation in class discussions in US graduate seminars. English for Specific Purposes. 28, 142-156<br />Books: <br />Swales, J. M. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. New York: Cambridge University Press.<br />Book Chapters:  <br />Connor, U. & Mayberry, S. (1996). Learning discipline-specific academic writing. A case study of a Finnish graduate student in the United States. In E.Ventola & A. Mauranen (Eds.), Academic writing: Intercultural and textual issues (pp.231-253). Philadelphia: John Benjamins. <br />
    23. 23. Annotated Bibliography Sample<br />Ehrenreich, B. (2001). Nickel and dimed: On (not) getting by in America. New York: Henry Holt and Company.<br />In this book of nonfiction based on the journalist's experiential research, Ehrenreich attempts to ascertain whether it is currently possible for an individual to live on a minimum-wage in America. Taking jobs as a waitress, a maid in a cleaning service, and a Wal-Mart sales employee, the author summarizes and reflects on her work, her relationships with fellow workers, and her financial struggles in each situation. An experienced journalist, Ehrenreich is aware of the limitations of her experiment and the ethical implications of her experiential research tactics and reflects on these issues in the text. The author is forthcoming about her methods and supplements her experiences with scholarly research on her places of employment, the economy, and the rising cost of living in America. Ehrenreich’s project is timely, descriptive, and well-researched<br />
    24. 24. Assignments<br />Annotated Bibliography (at least 8 sources)<br />Summary: What are the main arguments? What is the point of this book or article? What topics are covered? If someone asked what this article/book is about, what would you say? The length of your annotations will determine how detailed your summary is.(one paragraph)<br />Reflection: Once you’ve summarized a source, you need to ask how it fits into your research. Was this source helpful to you? How does it help you shape your argument? How can you use this source in your research project? Has it changed how you think about your topic? (just a few sentences) <br />
    25. 25. The good, bad and ugly <br />The good: academic publishing on the Internet <br />The bad: time wasting on Internet searches <br />The ugly: Internet hoaxes, scams and legends<br />http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/detective/goodbadugly.html<br />

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