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Sketchnoting for beginners #LW2016

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Language World 2016
What is
sketch
noting?
“Sketchnotes are purposeful
doodling while listening to
something interesting.
Sketchnotes don't re...
Why
visuals?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/gforsythe/6061101946/
The cognitive
benefits of doodling
Visual notetaking in
t...

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Sketchnoting for beginners #LW2016

  1. 1. Language World 2016
  2. 2. What is sketch noting? “Sketchnotes are purposeful doodling while listening to something interesting. Sketchnotes don't require high drawing skills, but do require a skill to visually synthesize and summarize via shapes, connectors, and text. Sketchnotes are as much a method of note taking as they are a form of creative expression.” sketchnotearmy.com NuggetHead
  3. 3. Why visuals? https://www.flickr.com/photos/gforsythe/6061101946/ The cognitive benefits of doodling Visual notetaking in the classroom holism feedback chemical changes connectivity fun
  4. 4. NuggetHea
  5. 5. #ililc5
  6. 6. How might you use Sketchnotes? Link
  7. 7. presentations - a ‘sketch-keynote?’
  8. 8. revision
  9. 9. thanks to Rachel Smith
  10. 10. stories - T4W
  11. 11. https://flic.kr/p/qyZVvg
  12. 12. literature
  13. 13. Used with permission
  14. 14. notetaking Brad Ovenell-Carter “Intelligent note taking”
  15. 15. notes - don’t need special equipment!
  16. 16. Erin French - Google+
  17. 17. Planning and organising ideas from Classroom Collective
  18. 18. stimulus
  19. 19. Thanks to Caroline Rosalind, posted on LiPS - “A 9 year old's way of remembering vocabulary. She wanted
  20. 20. instructions?
  21. 21. explanations
  22. 22. explanations 2
  23. 23. Promoting language http://study-hack.com/2014/03/28/things- to-keep-in-mind-when-learning-a-foreign/ Quotations Reasons to study Tips for learning What does the course look like?
  24. 24. Used with permission
  25. 25. More examples Karen Bosch slideshare has examples from classroom Ms Wendi’s World - examples from High School pupils
  26. 26. ‘How to’ guidance Verbal to Visual classroom -Youtube tutorials Mike Rohde’s Sketchnote Handbook Sylvia Duckworth Sketchnoting and Beginner’s Guide to Sketchnoting (on an iPad) Sketchnote Scribes Google+ community Silvia Tolisano Sketchnoting for learning
  27. 27. Thanks to Sylvia for permission to use
  28. 28. NuggetHea
  29. 29. NuggetHea
  30. 30. Carol Anne McGuire on Flickr
  31. 31. from wecollaborate from Maya IDA from Cheryl Lowry
  32. 32. Link
  33. 33. NuggetHea
  34. 34. Where do I start? a favourite quotation a story a TED talk a “how to” guide a film a presentation - or staff meeting
  35. 35. Mike Rohde
  36. 36. PRIMARY LANGUAGE EDUCATOR AND CONSULTANT LISIBO@ME.COM ¡VÁMONOS! - LISIBO.COM TWITTER - @LISIBO LTD

Editor's Notes

  • Kevin Thorn - Sketchnoting is a form of Visual Writing by expressing ideas, concepts, and important thoughts in a meaningful flow by listening, processing, and transferring what you hear by sketching either by analog or digital.
  • “When you draw an object, the mind becomes deeply, intensely attentive,” says the designer Milton Glaser, an author of a 2008 monograph titled Drawing Is Thinking. “And it’s that act of attention that allows you to really grasp something, to become fully conscious of it.”
    Arguably, making graphic marks predates verbal language, so whether as a simple doodle or a more deliberate free-hand drawing, the act is essential to expressing spontaneous concepts and emotions.
    What’s more, according to a study published in the Journal of Applied Cognitive Psychology, doodlers find it easier to recall dull information (even 29 percent more) than non-doodlers, because the latter are more likely to daydream.

    Neuro plasticity - rewiring the brain
    what do you visualise at this point?
    • Holism. It exercises students' kinesthetic, auditory, linguistic, and verbal modalities.
    • Feedback. Visuals offer tangible, immediate insight that teachers can use to gauge and build upon comprehension.
    • Chemical changes. It can generate a much-needed dopamine surge for pleasure, oxytocin surge due to love and trust that undergirds success, and a decrease in cortisol associated with stress.
    • Connectivity. Ideas filtered through visual notes leap off the page and nourish the brain's love for connections, imagery, and storytelling.
    • Fun. Big-picture comprehension. Deep thinking and imagining. Synthesizing information. Cerebral satisfaction. A "brain break." A chance to revisit content. Listening. Laughing.
  • Reflection : “We don’t learn from experiences, we learn from reflecting on the experience” John Dewey
    Note Taking: How can we summarize main ideas visually?
    Visual Thinking: How can we make thinking visual and visible to others?
    Content Creation: How can we take concepts and content, in order to be able to share visually to appeal to a larger audience
    Memory Aid: Doodling triggers memory after the event has passed. Visuals beat text when it comes to remembering
    Process Ideation: Documenting the formation of concepts and ideas
    Storytelling: Conveying of events through images and text
    Mind Mapping: Brainstorming and organizing of ideas, thoughts and connections
  • In 2009 Jackie Andrade a professor at the University of Plymouth created a psychological experiment to see if doodling was of any benefit to your memory.  One group was asked to doodle whilst listening to a phone message and the other group didn’t.  The group that doodled retained 29% more information than the group that didn’t.  Whilst this is hardly conclusive proof that doodling is a huge aid to memory it does point towards its potential.
  • http://www.comicsineducation.com/exemplars.html
  • “Sketchnotes are intelligent note-taking,” says Ovenell-Carter, director of educational technologies and a teacher at Mulgrave School, a K-12 independent school in Vancouver, B.C. “The note-taking process is normally passive. But with sketchnotes, you don’t write anything down until your thoughts are there. It’s already digested.” https://plus.google.com/communities/115990332552316650304
  • handout
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