EV402 Session 9 - Creating a classroom culture to support positive behaviour

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EV402 Session 9 - Creating a classroom culture to support positive behaviour

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  • Students to generate their own success criteria to return to at the end of the session
  • FLAG UP THAT BEHAVIOUR IS ONE OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES. ALSO PLEASE REFER STUDENTS TO Brighton UNI NATIONAL PRIORITIES WEBSITEIf time, could come back to these at the end of the session and identify how they have been covered in the session
  • Learning behaviours or ‘behaviour for learning’ is the term that Ellis and Tod have adopted in their discussions to support the concept that behaviour management should not be separated from learning and this is becoming more widely accepted than the term ‘behaviour management’. Behaviour for learning implies that children need certain behaviours to learn most effectively ‘Behaviour management’ implies that teachers need to behave in certain ways to ‘manage behaviour’. Authoritarian, reward charts, sanctions, praise etc….that the learning and behaviour management are separate and that managing behaviour is prerequisite to learning. Behaviour first. Learning next...not connected!The next slide captures this as a quote.‘The implication of an emphasis on behaviour management is that there is a discrete set of skills that can be learned by the teacher. This identification of a set of skills that can be learned is not in itself a problem. The problematic element is when these skills are seen as distinct from the teacher’s role in promoting learning.’ Ellis and Tod (2009) page 46.
  • A few moments of reflection on this quote.
  • Does good behavior mean that children are ready are ready and willing to learn? Is there a need for a moral education? What would that consist of?
  • Stress direct relationship between learning and behaviourIn other words, the management choices we make on our lesson plans will have direct effect on how successful the learning is. PLANNING IS ALL! How do we know what management choices to make (link to AfL, observation etc.)?
  • What do the pupils say? What do students remember about behaviour being managed in their own schooling?
  • Effective behaviour management is based on the teacher‘s ability to successfully create a well-managed, structured classroom environment so that learning can occur. Teaching a number of children with different needs, behaviours and attention spans can be challenging. However, when a positive learning culture is created, the children will learn better because they will know what is expected of them.http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/15811/1/120713primaryen.pdfUnpick each bullet point and give examples from classroom practice. Ask the students to share their experiences.
  • How does Baz address the points made in the previous slide (half of group to do this and feed back to whole group)(Other half) Identify any issues that Baz faces in the video clip. What do you think is triggering any difficult behaivour? Any thoughts about what he should do? What feedback would you give Baz?Play Sue Cowley’s feedback afterwards
  • The inter-relationship between factors which contribute to a positive learning environment is about how assessment can inform behaviour managementLINK TO ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING SESSION AND HIGHLIGHT CHILDREN WITH SEND
  • What is it like not to be heard?The most effective relationships are ones where compromise happens that show each person listening and responding in ways that are for the benefit of the other. Pupil voice in the classroom is vital if relationships, either with the teacher or other pupils, are to be strengthened. This, in turn, will help the child feel safe and secure in their learning.
  • Important to understand these key messages
  • Give an image of a behaviour management strategy to each group. Ask them to critique it and share their responses with the rest of the group. Have they considered whether it would work with all year groups?Have they considered how long the strategy might work for?Etc.
  • Why do schools have a behaviour policy? A set of principles making schools proactive rather than reactiveWhat should it contain? Procedures to followBecause consistent whole-school behaviour management depends on having a quality policy as its bedrock. It is one of the first policies which you should collect on placement. However, any behaviour policy is only as good as the curriculum that surrounds it – not matter how good a policy may appear on paper it cannot compensate for deficits in the curriculum. What values might it promote? Ask students to listHonestyLoyaltyKindnessPatienceToleranceRespect for self, others, authority and propertyPolitenessFairnessTrustDiligencePerseveranceShare a ‘real’ behaviour policy and ask the students to share their thoughts. Were there any surprises? Did they feel comfortable with the policy? Do they have any criticisms?
  • Cut up the scenarios and give one to a group of 3 or 4. Really encourage the students to decide on how to approach these situations building on the theory of the session.
  • As this is the final session for semester 1 and semester 2 focuses more specificallyon placement, it is worth a moment to reflect: The next slide offers the following quote:‘Reflection has the power to change something that we might not fully understand or have control and influence over into something with more personal clarity, coherence and meaning.’ Ghaye, 2011:90
  • Set up groups and reading activity for Xmas hols. The questions on the next slide can shape the presentation but they might like to use them as a framework to support their reading of the documents
  • Set up groups and reading activity for Xmas hols. The questions on the next slide can shape the presentation but they might like to use them as a framework to support their reading of the documents
  • EV402 Session 9 - Creating a classroom culture to support positive behaviour

    1. 1. CREATING A CLASSROOM CULTURE TO SUPPORT POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR
    2. 2. LEARNING INTENTIONS To understand the links between teaching, learning and behaviour To identify some of the key components of a positive learning environment To explore positive behaviour management strategies
    3. 3. PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment Have clear rules and routines for behaviour in classrooms and take responsibility for promoting good and courteous behaviour both in classrooms and around the school, in acccordance with the school’s behaviour policy Have high expectations of behaviour and establish a framework for discipline with a range of strategies, using praise, sanctions and rewards consistently and fairly Manage classes effectively, using approaches which are appropriate to pupils’ needs in order to involve and motivate them Maintain good relationships with pupils, exercise appropriate authority, and act decisively when necessary
    4. 4. READING FROM LAST WEEK Focus: Classroom organisation and management in the primary classroom Reading: Hayes, D. (2006), ‘A Purposeful Learning Environment’ in Inspiring Primary Teaching, Exeter: Learning Matters Ltd. Kyriacou, C. (2010) ‘How Should We Teach?’ in Arthur, J. & Davies, I. (Eds) The Routledge Education Studies Textbook, Abingdon: Routledge Questions: What have you read about classroom organisation and management that you think you would like to try during your first placement?
    5. 5. BEHAVIOUR FOR LEARNING ‘behaviour for learning’ ‘behaviour management’ Discuss these terms. How are they different? The same? Which do you prefer? Why?
    6. 6. ‘The implication of an emphasis on behaviour management is that there is a discrete set of skills that can be learned by the teacher. This identification of a set of skills that can be learned is not in itself a problem. The problematic element is when these skills are seen as distinct from the teacher’s role in promoting learning.’ Ellis and Tod 2009:46.
    7. 7. SHOULD WE TEACH CHILDREN HOW TO BEHAVE? What do you think? What do we mean by good behaviour? Should we use rewards or are they a form of bribery? What about sanctions? Are these threats?
    8. 8. ‘The Review strongly supports (Steer’s) view . . . that ‘the quality of teaching, learning and behaviour are inseparable’ and the principle that the management of behaviour and the management of learning should be aligned and consistent’ (Alexander, 2010, p496)
    9. 9. “they liked consistency rather than moodiness, fair but firm discipline, not shouting or nagging” “Teachers who shouted, or who were perceived as unfair or unpredictable, made children anxious” A good teacher should… …know everyone’s names. (Alexander 2010 p148)
    10. 10. EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Well-managed classrooms: • encourage respect and develop positive relationships • have well-planned lessons • begin the year with a set of rules and routines which are understood by all children • have agreed rewards and positive reinforcements • have a selection of options for dealing with disciplinary problems • make use of their physical space
    11. 11. EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
    12. 12. “If you keep doing what you’re doing, you’ll keep getting what you’re getting” It is necessary for you as the teacher to work out why particular behaviours are happening otherwise you’re just going to get more of the same – so ASSESSMENT OF NEEDS is vital if alternative strategies are to be sought
    13. 13. What might happen if we don’t get our ‘needs’ met? • • • • • • • • We feel frustrated We don’t feel listened to We don’t feel part of anything We feel isolated We feel invisible We feel angry (with ourselves and others) We behave in ways that demand they be met Any others?
    14. 14. • Behaviour can change • Behaviour has a function • What we do affects what children do
    15. 15. BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES In groups of 3: • Critique your behaviour management strategy • What are the benefits? • What are the drawbacks?
    16. 16. POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT IN ACTION School behaviour policies Why do schools have a behaviour policy? What might/should it contain? How might a policy help you to deal with: The behaviour of the whole class? The resolution of conflict between children? How will you support the development of positive behaviour in your class?
    17. 17. KNOW YOURSELF, YOUR TRIGGERS AND YOUR OWN EMOTIONAL RESPONSE AND RESILIENCE TOLERATION TASK
    18. 18. SCENARIOS TO EXPLORE 1. During a whole class carpet discussion, 2 girls begin to plait one another's hair. In doing so they opt out of the activity and begin to distract other children who start to join in. An outbreak of hairdressing is about to occur. 2. There is a phantom whistler in the room. Each time you look up, it stops. 3. You ask the children to stop what they are doing mid lesson and several continue with their work. Everything begins to feel wobbly the more you ask. You feel like you are losing control. 4. A child repeatedly tells you ‘I don’t want to...I don’t care.’ 5. There is a squabble over lego. One child hits another. You reproach both children and encourage them to work together without quarrelling. As soon as your back is turned, the hitter strikes again. 6. A child consistently 'avoids' getting started by going to the toilet, sharpening pencils, finding his book etc 7. There is a child in your class who seems constantly to push the boundaries. 8. There is a lunchtime argument over football and the bad mood is brought into the classroom.
    19. 19. SO…. What can you do as a student teacher, to make the children want to come back to school tomorrow?! What strategies will you use? Make a list of eight!
    20. 20. REFLECTIONS ON SEMESTER 1 Theories of education Classroom management and behaviour for learning Play and exploration Landscape of education – history and changes Approaches to teaching and learning Observing children’s learning Inclusive practice Classroom organisation Assessment
    21. 21. REFLECTION ‘Reflection has the power to change something that we might not fully understand or have control and influence over into something with more personal clarity, coherence and meaning.’ Ghaye, 2011:90 Use the power of reflection to underpin your learning from Semester 1!
    22. 22. OVER CHRISTMAS Please read the policy document that you have been allocated. These documents can be found on the EV402 reading list. They are listed as the ‘key’ readings in the policy section. Please read the notes for each of these documents as you may not need to read the entire document. 1. Draft Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (consultation ends 9th December) 2. The Development Matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage 3. Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage 2012 : The Department for Education 4. Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage 2012 : The Department for Education
    23. 23. USE THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS TO SHAPE YOUR READING OF THE POLICY DOCUMENT 1. Who is this for? 1. What are the aims? 3. Think of 5 ways it could impact on your work in placement 1 4. What 3 questions does it raise?

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