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EV402 Session 6 - Observation

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Session 6 - Observation

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EV402 Session 6 - Observation

  1. 1. Education Studies Observing Children’s Learning Session Six Semester One 2013 Observation
  2. 2. Today we are thinking about…..  The role of observation in classroom practice  The use of observation to reflect on practice  Considering different types of observation
  3. 3. Engaging with reading….. What is the purpose of observation?
  4. 4. Why do we observe? • To understand children’s: Health care and safety Development and growth Needs Social interaction with peers and adults Achievements Changes in behaviour Styles Strengths, areas of interest, schemas, learning Any barriers to learning To inform our planning
  5. 5. As teachers we need to know  If the teaching and learning is successful and meeting all of the child’s individual needs  If children are making progress  If the learning environment is supporting children and fostering learning “By watching children and young people: We evaluate their needs Extend their experiences Facilitate their learning” (Sharman, C., Cross, W. , and Vennis, D. (2007) Observing Children and Young People, London: Continuum)(p15)
  6. 6. Early Years Foundation Stage 2008 “Practitioners’ observations of children help them to assess the progress which children are making. Observations help practitioners to decide where children are in their learning and development and to plan what to do. This is an essential part of daily practice in any setting.” (DCSF, 2008, p.11)
  7. 7. The revised EYFS 2012 “Ongoing assessment (also known as formative assessment) is an integral part of the learning and development process. It involves practitioners observing children to understand their level of achievement, interests and learning styles, and then to shape learning experiences for each child reflecting those observations”. (DfE, 2012, p.10)
  8. 8. The revised EYFS 2012
  9. 9. Observation, assessment and planning cycle Reflect Evaluate
  10. 10. Observation and Reflection “…teaching practice is constantly evolving in the same manner that children’s learning evolves” (Fiore, 2012 p. 51) Reflect Evaluate Evidence Plan Analyse Evidence Make Provision Collect Evidence Act Pollard, 2005, p17
  11. 11. Observation and the Teachers’ Standards • S2: be aware of pupils’ capabilities and their prior knowledge, and plan teaching to build on these • S4: reflect systematically on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching • S6: make use of formative and summative assessment to secure pupils’ progress
  12. 12. Some types of observation         Narrative observation Timed sampling observations Event sampling observations Tracking observations Observing an area or an activity Participant observations On-the-spot observations Checklists
  13. 13. Observations... • • • • Should be for a reason – are purposeful Should focus on what a child CAN do Should record what actually happens Should be objective and unbiased – the observer should stand back from personal values and beliefs (avoiding value-laden emotional language) • Observers should try to avoid ‘influencing’ the child
  14. 14. Planned Observation Objective Observation Evaluation Next Steps
  15. 15. Presenting a planned observation: an example 1) 2) 3) 4) 6) 7) 8) 9) Date and time. Age/s of child/ren being observed. Names of child/ren and adults. Be mindful of how you store sensitive information whilst on placement. Use pseudonyms if you are removing the observations from the school. Context (eg. The activity the child/ren are engaging with). Aim (eg to identify fine, manipulative skills) Record of the observation Evaluation/interpretation (assessment of achievements) Recommendations for Next Steps/Actions
  16. 16. Narrative Observation • Record a narrative observation of the sequence. • Share your observations with your talk partner • What evaluation can you made, in light of the aim of the observation? • What might be the next steps?
  17. 17. In Summary… • Observation is an important part of the learning and teaching process • Observation enables teachers to understand the unique abilities and needs of each child • Observation is used by teachers to plan appropriate experiences • Observation supports teachers to reflect on their practice
  18. 18. For Next Time…. Focus: Assessment Reading: • Clarke, S. (2005) ‘Defining formative assessment’, in Formative Assessment in Action. Weaving the elements together, London: Hodder Murray • Nutbrown, C. (2006) ‘Assessment for learning’, in Threads of Thinking: Young Children Learning and the Role of Early Education, (3rd ed), London, Sage Questions: • What is your understanding of ‘assessment for learning’ as explored by Cathy Nutbrown? • What are some of the key elements of formative assessment? What might this look like in the classroom?

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