PHYSICAL
COMPUTING
COMPUTATIONAL THINKING AND
PROGRAMMING
Session
Overview

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•
•
•
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Programming within the National Curriculum at KS1/KS2
An introduction to programmable toys
iP...
COMPUTING - KS1/KS2

Aims

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure
that all pupils:
 can understand and appl...
COMPUTING - KS1/KS2

Key stage 1
Pupils should be taught to:
 understand what algorithms are; how they are
implemented as...
COMPUTING - KS1/KS2

Key stage 2
Pupils should be taught to:


design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific ...
EARLY PROGRAMMING
An introduction to logical thinking, algorithms and decomposing via floor robots
Computing Unplugged
An introduction to programmable toys
PLAYING WITH BEEBOTS
List the aspects of learning which you think using these
could support
Language and communication- sp...
An introduction to programmable toys
Roamer

“Roamer-Too is the latest version of the popular Roamer robot (now called
Cla...
An introduction to programmable toys
Activities
-

Using a roamer, create an equilateral triangle
Knock down a tower of br...
IPADS AND
PROGRAMMING
MAKEY MAKEY
An invention kit that allows you to embed computing into physical objects
SUBMITTING YOUR
SCRATCH PROJECT
Due Monday 13th of January no later than 4pm

1.

Share your project on Scratch

2.

Downl...
EP404 Session 10 Physical Computing
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EP404 Session 10 Physical Computing

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EP404 Session 10 Physical Computing

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  • This slide highlights the aims we’ll be focus on in these two sessions (i.e. aims 1 and 2)Reassure students that we’ll be starting to unpack some of the terminology used here (e.g. abstraction, logic, algorithms) but also explain that we can only achieve so much in our sessions and they will need to take full advantage of other professional development opportunities that present themselves (e.g. engaging with online materials and with staff development opps in school)Explain that aims 3 and 4 are particularly relevant to the development of children’s broader digital literacy3mins
  • Algorithms: a useful definition for KS1 is “a sequence of clear (precise/unambiguous) instructions to achieve a specific outcome”. At KS1 an algorithm can be thought of as being like a recipe. If the algorithm has been logically developed then the outcome should be predictable.Debug: identify and correct errors in programs.3mins
  • Algorithms: a useful definition for KS1 is “a sequence of clear (precise/unambiguous) instructions to achieve a specific outcome”. At KS1 an algorithm can be thought of as being like a recipe. If the algorithm has been logically developed then the outcome should be predictable.Bebug: identify and correct errors in programs.Explain that we’ll be exploring sequence, selection and repetition during the sessions (and in their follow-up task).3mins
  • Explore sequence (sets of specific instructions, followed in a particular order) through Bee-Bot and the free Bee-Bot app for iOS (we will have some iPods for this but students may want to download this app to their own devices). Half of group use the Bee-Bots whilst the other half explore the app (10mins like this then swap over for another 10mins). Make sure students note that it is possible to build up a sequence in stages by programming and testing a bit at a time (this allows for debugging and an early kind of iterative approach to programming. Also highlight importance of clearing Bee-Bots memory unless they are building on a previous sequence.Move on to exploring repetition through use of Roamer’s repeat command. Model this very briefly and explain/show how this can be used to create more efficient programs. Set the challenge of drawing an equilateral triangle with Roamer (what kind of thinking does this require?). (20mins with Roamers in total)If there is time, show Pro-Bot and explain how this introduces 'selection' and inputs/outputs.40mins in total
  • Get students to watch this video and then ask them to brainstorm ways in which they could introduce programming and algorithms without switching on a computer. E.g. recipes, instructions etc.Ask them to blindfold each other and direct their partner around the room.
  • Many children will have explored and played with programmable toys at home. They will also have spent many hours watching TV, playing games (iPad) and watching their parents use various technologies around the house and out and about.
  • There are a range of accessories that you can purchase to use with your Bee-Bots. These accessories include clip-on shells that you can use to give your Bee-Bot a makeover and mats relating to a number of common Early Years learning contexts. Bee-Bot Mats Synchronised Buzzing Bee-Bot Barrier Games I think I can.... I think I can... The Little Bee-Bot that could. investigate the different loads that Bee-Bots can tow and how the weight of the loads can effect the speed of the Bee-Bot.Teachers may use the text ‘The Little Engine that Could’ as a stimulus for this activity. Students could then collaboratively develop a class big book of their ownGroovy Bots §work collaboratively to make the Bee-Bots dance in sequence. How far is it? In this activity, students work collaboratively to explore how far it is that a Bee-Bot can travel with each step. Bee-Bot Trails Ask each group to design a trail that the Bee-Bot can buzz along. Once students have designedtheir trail, they should test it and then ask other students to get their Bee-Bot to buzz along their trail. During this final part, students will need to work together to estimate how many steps they will need the Bee-Bot to take. Bee-Bot Rulers To provide students with a way of measuring how far the Bee-Bot moves with each step, you may want to make a collection of Bee-Bot Rulers for students to use. Bee-Bot Ruler A Bee-Bot moves 15cm with each step. Rhyme Time make the Bee-Bot move to the rhyme they would likeSlalom Buzzing Bee-Bots Day Out Alternatively, students could develop clues relating to the different locations within the street. For example, a clue might be ‘Blinky Bee-Bot needs to buy some bananas but he needs to get some money out from the ATM first. Help Blinky get to the bank and then program him to visit the shop where he can buy some bananas’. Bee-Bots Walk This activity involves the class creating an innovation of the text ‘Rosie’s Walk’ by Pat Hutchins. To begin this activity, the teacher reads ‘Rosie’s Walk’ to the class. Make a Bee-Bot Course Bee-Bot Extreme Makeovers forward, backwards, up, down, around, right, left, under, over, through, beside, next to, wait, pause, move, go, turn, rotate, 360 degrees, face, direction etc. Bee-Bot Number Hives Bot-Detectives ‘What am I?’ texts form a valuable part of literacy development in many early phase classrooms. In this activity, students work collaboratively to develop a series of clues relating to a collection of pictures that have been placed on a mat. For example, the mat may contain photographs of animals taken during a class excursion to the zoo. Ladybug Lunch Ladybugs are our friends in the garden as they love to much on aphids, mealybugs and mites. In this activity, students create a mat using either real leaves, photos or rubbings of leaves they have found in their school or home environments. Creating a home for our Bee-Bots Turtle Island Students are then invited to come up and guess the location of the eggs. Pollen Hunt . To create this game, you will need to create a collection of flower pots and small tokens that will represent the pollen. .
  • Discuss the idea of physical computing with the students and get them to think about the computational inputs/outputs that automate aspects of our environment. Show them the makeymakey video and discuss how this could be used.
  • Plan a technology trail where children photograph, observe and walk around the classroom/ school office/home/local area create a collage of ICT appliances from magazine pictures.
  • EP404 Session 10 Physical Computing

    1. 1. PHYSICAL COMPUTING COMPUTATIONAL THINKING AND PROGRAMMING
    2. 2. Session Overview • • • • • Programming within the National Curriculum at KS1/KS2 An introduction to programmable toys iPads and Programming Makey Makey Assignment
    3. 3. COMPUTING - KS1/KS2 Aims The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:  can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation  can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems  can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems  are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.
    4. 4. COMPUTING - KS1/KS2 Key stage 1 Pupils should be taught to:  understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions  create and debug simple programs  use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs  use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content  recognise common uses of information technology beyond school  use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.
    5. 5. COMPUTING - KS1/KS2 Key stage 2 Pupils should be taught to:  design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts  use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output  use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs  understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration  use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content  select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information  use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.
    6. 6. EARLY PROGRAMMING An introduction to logical thinking, algorithms and decomposing via floor robots
    7. 7. Computing Unplugged
    8. 8. An introduction to programmable toys
    9. 9. PLAYING WITH BEEBOTS List the aspects of learning which you think using these could support Language and communication- speaking, listening Reading – early sequencing, prediction, re-telling, Social – taking turns, listening to others Maths- numbers, estimation, distance, turn, positioning Knowledge of the world and people- Katie Morag Technology- sequencing, turn on and off, responding to instructions, batteries, prediction
    10. 10. An introduction to programmable toys Roamer “Roamer-Too is the latest version of the popular Roamer robot (now called Classic Roamer). It combines the latest robotic technology with the science of learning to create an exciting and dynamic educational tool that can help your students understand complex ideas across a wide range of age groups and subjects.” Valiant Technology
    11. 11. An introduction to programmable toys Activities - Using a roamer, create an equilateral triangle Knock down a tower of bricks Navigate a maze Shall we dance? Synchronous dancing robots. Tip: Procedures are great for this.
    12. 12. IPADS AND PROGRAMMING
    13. 13. MAKEY MAKEY An invention kit that allows you to embed computing into physical objects
    14. 14. SUBMITTING YOUR SCRATCH PROJECT Due Monday 13th of January no later than 4pm 1. Share your project on Scratch 2. Download the word doc called ‘submission form’ from the tab ‘Assignment (Scratch) submission point’. Complete the form by entering your name and the URL link to your Scratch project. Submit this doc through the Turn-It-In (TII) point for your group. 3. Complete the Google doc linked to from the above word doc by pasting the URL link to your Scratch project You can expect to received feedback via TII on Monday 10th of February.

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