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Ei607 digital literacy

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Ei505 digital literacy
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Ei607 digital literacy

  1. 1. Digital Literacy With a focus on Web Literacy © 2014, School of Education, University of Brighton
  2. 2. – National Curriculum, Computing, Purpose of study “...Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.”
  3. 3. Subject content for KS1 Pupils should be taught to: • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.
  4. 4. Subject content for KS2 Pupils should be taught to: • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.
  5. 5. What exactly is digital literacy?
  6. 6. “…able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.” – National Curriculum, Computing, Purpose of study
  7. 7. “To be digitally literate is to have access to a broad range of practices and cultural resources that you are able to apply to digital tools. It is the ability to make, represent and share meaning in different modes and formats; to create, collaborate and communicate effectively and to understand how and when digital technologies can best be used to support these processes. ” – Futurelab, 2010, goo.gl/lBVKv
  8. 8. The essential elements of digital literacies Doug Belshaw at TEDxWarwick, youtube.com/watch?v=A8yQPoTcZ78
  9. 9. Doug Belshaw, dougbelshaw.com/ebooks/digilit/
  10. 10. Essential Elements of Digital Literacy • Cultural – Look at the context in which the literacy is situated • Cognitive – How do we think when we are using a device (vs when we are not)? • Constructive – We should aim to use technology in a constructive (vs a passive) way • Communicative – We should be using technology to enhance our communications • Confident – You need to be confident to jump in feet first and explore/use/master/learn technology • Creative – Using technology in the classroom requires some creativity and risk taking – don’t stick to the basics when you can test out a new idea or use for technology • Critical – You need the ability to look at the technologies you’re using (and what you’re using them for) with a critical eye • Civic – We should be using the technologies available to us for greater good (which can be widely defined) Edudemic after Belshaw, edudemic.com/digital-literacy/
  11. 11. How digitally literate are you? Take a moment to reflect upon your own level of digital literacy. • Do you consider yourself to have a high, medium or low level of digital literacy? • How do you know?
  12. 12. Web Literacy Exploring one dimension of digital literacy
  13. 13. Pub Quiz Time! How Web Literate are you?
  14. 14. What exactly is web literacy? Mozilla have developed a Web Literacy Map “covering the complete set of skills people need to thrive in today’s digital world.” webmaker.org/en-US/literacy
  15. 15. Mozilla Webmaker, webmaker.org
  16. 16. X-Ray Goggles Mozilla's X-Ray Goggles make it relatively easy for children to start exploring HTML: the language of the Web. goggles.webmaker.org/
  17. 17. 1. Work through steps 1-6 on the X-Ray Goggles page. 2. Then follow steps 1-3 to add the X-Ray Goggles to your bookmarks bar. 3. Now find a page on the Web that you would like to remix (e.g. a news article on the BBC website). Try changing the text on this page (e.g. change the headline and some of the body text). 4. Have a go at replacing an image in your chosen page. To do this you'll need to be able to locate the URL for the current image and then replace this with the full URL for another image that already ‘lives' on the Web. 5. When you have remixed your web page, you can publish it so that you can view the remix again later or send a link to a friend so that they can see it. This step will require you to sign up for a Mozilla Persona <https://login.persona.org/about>.
  18. 18. Thimble Using Mozilla Thimble children can create their own web pages by editing HTML code. Thimble provides lots of support to help children get started with this process. Perhaps the best way to start learning to write HTML is to remix someone else's code. thimble.webmaker.org/en-US
  19. 19. webmaker.makes.org/thimble/create-your-own-comic-a-starter-make
  20. 20. Comic Strip 1. Follow the instructions in this Thimble ‘starter make’ to create your own comic strip (see the dark grey text): webmaker.makes.org/thimble/create-your-own-comic-a- starter-make 2. https://webmaker.makes.org/thimble/create-your-own-comic- a-starter-make 3. Save your completed comic strip (you'll need to be signed in using your Mozilla Persona to do this) and maybe share it with your friends via Facebook or Twitter. 4. Check out other great Thimble starter makes: ginatesoriero.makes.org/thimble/ODU0NzIwNTEy/starter- makes-teaching-kit
  21. 21. More Webmaker Resources The Webmaker site hosts a wide range of excellent resources that will help you to develop your learners' web literacy. For example, there is a ‘teaching kit’ for Privacy and Security <https://laura.makes.org/thimble/privacy-and- security-teaching-kit> Or learn more about how to harness the power of the Web using search <https://webmaker.org/en- US/resources/literacy/weblit-Search>
  22. 22. Follow up from today Watch: TED Talk Doug Belshaw Digital Literacies http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8yQPoTcZ78

Editor's Notes

  • Doug Belshaw suggests that being digitally literate is more complex than we might imagine and in fact involves multiple literacies:
  • https://webmaker.makes.org/thimble/create-your-own-comic-a-starter-make
  • https://webmaker.makes.org/thimble/create-your-own-comic-a-starter-make

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