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Ei505 getting started with programming session 1

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Ei505 getting started with programming session 1

  1. 1. Computational thinking and programming Key Stage 2
  2. 2. Subject content for KS2 Pupils should be taught to: • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  3. 3. Decomposing problems “solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts” - Subject content KS2 Decomposition is the process of breaking a problem down into smaller problems so that ultimately the bigger problem can be solved (and explained clearly to someone else or to a computer).
  4. 4. Sequence, repetition & selection “use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs” - Subject content KS2 Sequence: putting instructions in an order where each one is executed one after the other Repetition: one or more instructions are repeated a number of times or until a condition is met or the program is stopped Selection: instructions are executed depending on whether a particular condition is met Selection lies at the heart of the ‘intelligence’ of a computer program.
  5. 5. Activity #1 Hour of Code Working in pairs, follow the Hour of Code beginners tutorial. Your challenge is to complete this in 30 mins! http://learn.code.org/hoc/1 NB: This tutorial introduces the key programming concepts of sequence, repetition and selection
  6. 6. Debugging at KS2 “design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals” - Subject content KS2 This builds upon children’s experience of debugging at KS1. As their programs become more sophisticated the debugging becomes more challenging.
  7. 7. Activity #2 Hungry Monkey 1 http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390939/ Can you make the monkey sprite move left and right when the left and right arrow keys are pressed?
  8. 8. Activity #3 Hungry Monkey 2 http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390750/ Can you make the monkey jump to catch the bananas?
  9. 9. Variables “work with variables” - Subject content KS2 Variables are containers for data. They enable us to store, retrieve or change data. A variable could be used in a game to keep track of a user’s score or to remember a player’s name.
  10. 10. Activity #4 Hungry Monkey 3 http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390032/ Can you make the score board work to keep track of the number of bananas monkey has caught?
  11. 11. Subject content for KS2 Pupils should be taught to: • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  12. 12. Follow Up Task • Read: http://www.naace.co.uk/curriculum/primaryguide • Take a look at: http://csunplugged.org/activities

Editor's Notes

  • Scratch Intro
    Explain that Scratch 2.0 runs in a browser so no need to install anything
    Give a brief tour of the Scratch 2.0 interface (the pic in the slide is hyperlinked to the Scratch site), including a very brief tour of the block toolbox
    Show where to sign up to community (would be helpful to briefly show your own community profile so they can see how the community works)
    Explain how Scratch uses simple blocks (like LEGO) that can be snapped together to create sequences of instructions (these are called ‘scripts’)
    Show how you can have multiple ‘scripts’ in Scratch and that these can run parallel to each other
    Explain that the scripts are attached to specific sprites or to the background

    Scratch intro from MIT team
    http://vimeo.com/29457909
  • Non-contact task

    Once working try using the code to create your own game? Can you change the monkey, bananas?

    Remix and share your game.

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