Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Exploring the Rainbow: Genders and Sexualities across Culture and Time

2,886 views

Published on

From inside one's own culture, gender and sexual orientation usually seem like rather straightforward phenomenon. In cross-cultural and historical perspective, however, there is nothing straightforward about it. This talk is a shallow but broad overview of a range of ways that different groups have organized gender and sexuality. It's an extraordinary tour that will make audiences take another look at their own cultural assumptions.

  • Be the first to comment

Exploring the Rainbow: Genders and Sexualities across Culture and Time

  1. 1. Lisa Wade, PhD Professor of Sociology Occidental College lisa-wade.com f:/lisawadephd i:/lisawadephd t:@lisawade
  2. 2. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  3. 3. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  4. 4. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  5. 5. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  6. 6. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  7. 7. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  8. 8. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  9. 9. Roughgarden, Joan. 2013 (10th ed). Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  10. 10.  How many genders are there?  Is gender static?  How is gender proven?  Is homosexuality eternal?  Is object choice it?
  11. 11.  Biological sex: primary and secondary sexual characteristics  Gender: masculinity, femininity, or other  Identity: what you feel  Appearance: how you look  Performance: how you act  Sexual orientation: the sex/gender of your sexual object choice, if any  Sexual role: your role in sexual activity
  12. 12.  16th century Europe
  13. 13.  16th century Europe
  14. 14.  Two-spirits, North America
  15. 15.  Māhū, akava’ine, fakaleiti, Fa'afafine, throughout Polynesia
  16. 16.  Hijra and Sadhin, India
  17. 17.  Muxe, Mexico
  18. 18.  Travesti, Brazil
  19. 19.  Guevedoces, Dominican Republic
  20. 20.  Kwolu-aatmwol, Papau New Guinea
  21. 21.  Bacha Posh, Afghanistan
  22. 22.  Bacha Posh, Afghanistan “It’s a privilege for me, that she is in boys’ clothing… It’s a help for me, with the shopping. And she can go in and out of the house without a problem.”
  23. 23.  Bacha Posh, Afghanistan
  24. 24.  Virgjinesha, Albania
  25. 25.  Hau, New Guinea
  26. 26.  Lobedu, Zambia
  27. 27.  Nádleehé, North America
  28. 28.  Gerai, West Borneo “Gerai people remained very uncertain about my gender for some time after I arrived in the community… This was despite the fact that people in the community knew from my first few days with them both that I had breasts… and that I had a vulva rather than a penis and testicles (this was obvious from my trips to defecate or urinate in the small stream used for that purpose, when literally dozens of people would line the banks to observe whether I performed these functions differently from them). As someone said to me at a later point, ‘Yes, I saw that you had a vulva, but I thought that Western men might be different.’” Helliwell, Christine. 2000. “It’s Only a Penis”: Rape, Feminism, and Difference. Signs 25, 3: 789-816.
  29. 29.  Two-spirits, North America
  30. 30.  Hijra, India
  31. 31.  Travesti, Brazil
  32. 32. Myth of the eternal homosexual: `“…gay men and lesbians always were and always will be. We are everywhere; not just now, but throughout history, in all societies and all periods.” D’Emilio, John. 1993. Capitalism and Gay Identity. In The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, edited by Henry Abelove et al. New York: Routledge.
  33. 33. Myth of the eternal homosexual: `“…gay men and lesbians always were and always will be. We are everywhere; not just now, but throughout history, in all societies and all periods.” D’Emilio, John. 1993. Capitalism and Gay Identity. In The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, edited by Henry Abelove et al. New York: Routledge.
  34. 34. • US, early colonial period
  35. 35. • US, 1940s
  36. 36. • US, 1940s
  37. 37.  US and abroad, World War II “The war is a tragedy to my mind and soul… but to my physical being, it is a memorable experience.”
  38. 38.  The Mattachine Society
  39. 39.  US, routinized non-homosexual homosexual behavior
  40. 40.  “Gay for Pay”
  41. 41.  Ancient Romans
  42. 42.  Travesti, Brazil
  43. 43.  Some trans men and women
  44. 44.  All of us, actually
  45. 45.  How many genders are there?  Is gender static?  How is gender proven?  Is homosexuality eternal?  Is object choice it?
  46. 46.  Our beliefs about gender and sexuality are specific to this time and place.  Deviations from the two sex/two gender/heterosexual system are incredibly common.  Remember the diversity.  Question categories, not people.
  47. 47. Lisa Wade, PhD Professor of Sociology Occidental College lisa-wade.com f:/lisawadephd i:/lisawadephd t:@lisawade

×