Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Methods for Correct Fitting of Pointe Shoes

60 views

Published on

At the Linda Jamieson School of Dance, students have the opportunity to progress through the graded curriculum set forth by the Royal Academy of Ballet. Students may begin pointe work at the Linda Jamieson School of Dance when they enter the pre-professional senior program and secure teacher consent.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Methods for Correct Fitting of Pointe Shoes

  1. 1. Methods for Correct Fitting of Pointe Shoes Linda Jamieson, School of Dance
  2. 2. Introduction  At the Linda Jamieson School of Dance, students have the opportunity to progress through the graded curriculum set forth by the Royal Academy of Ballet. Students may begin pointe work at the Linda Jamieson School of Dance when they enter the pre-professional senior program and secure teacher consent. A dancer's first pair of pointe shoes is a major milestone, and it is, therefore, vitally important to fit this first pair of shoes correctly. When the dancer is standing on flat feet, the toes should be straight and touching the interior of the toe box. If the shoe forces the toes to curl inward or if the skin spreads over the edge of the shoe, the shoe is too small. The toes should remain straight when the dancer performs a plié in second position, at which time the toes should touch the end of the box when the plié is at its deepest. The shoe should hold the foot snugly when the dancer goes en pointe.
  3. 3. Pointe Shoes  The dancer can check this fit by shifting onto one foot and pressing down gently into the box of the other shoe. The top of the foot should not bulge, nor should there be too much satin behind the heel. The wings should support both the big and little toes. The length of the shoe is correct if the end of the shank comes nearly to the edge of the heel. A long shank is indicated when the satin bags at the back of the heel, while a short shank may cause the satin to pull down and the foot to be unstable. A sufficiently long vamp is also necessary to hold the front of the foot steady, yet it should not be so long that it interferes with smooth rising through demi pointe. The dancer should expect to spend about an hour fitting the first pair of shoes. It is best if an experienced dancer or teacher can assist with the process. The dancer should also ask for advice about correct padding, which she should wear during the fitting to ensure accurate measuring.

×