Take a Bite Out of  Food Costs Linda Farr RD/LD [email_address] 210-735-2402
Desired Outcomes <ul><li>Participants will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify new food and dining trends </li></ul><ul...
New Food and Dining Realities
Spending Cuts Across All Incomes <ul><li>72% have made significant cuts </li></ul><ul><li>Hardest Hit: $45 K a year or les...
Changing Consumer Habits <ul><li>63% are more flexible about where to shop and what brands to buy </li></ul><ul><li>49% sh...
Consumer  Priorities <ul><li>3 in 4 Americans choose quality and nutritional value over lowest price </li></ul><ul><li>72%...
Coffee……….!
Consumer Splurges with $10 more <ul><li>13% (less than $45K) Convenience, compared to only 9% of those with a higher incom...
Family of Four—Food Cost at Home <ul><li>   Thrift Cost Plan   Low Cost Plan   Moderate Cost Plan   Liberal Cost Plan </li...
Food Purchases as a % of Income <ul><li>  AVG INCOME   LOWEST 20  %  MIDDLE 20  %   HIGHEST 20  %           </li></ul><ul>...
CPI--Projections for Food Prices in 2009 <ul><li>All Food—up 2-3% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5.5% in 2007-2008 (highest increas...
Percentage of Retail Price Staying with Farmer <ul><li>For every dollar sold at retail… </li></ul><ul><li>1960--   33%    ...
PLANNING TO SHOP <ul><li>Price Your Top 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Coupons </li></ul><ul><li>Discount or Bonus Cards </li></ul><...
Planning—Start a Price Book <ul><li>Buy a small notebook  </li></ul><ul><li>Put each store on a separate page  </li></ul><...
Planning--Coupons <ul><li>Manufacturer—Avg. $1.08 face value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>National coupon inserts in newspapers, ...
Coupon Tips—CouponMom.com System <ul><li>Know your prices </li></ul><ul><li>Use when favorite name brand items hit their l...
Planning--Discount or Bonus Cards <ul><li>PROs </li></ul><ul><li>members only double coupons </li></ul><ul><li>credit doll...
Planning--Rebates/Refunding <ul><li>Income $100K or more, age 35-64 women are most likely to apply </li></ul><ul><li>Incom...
Planning--Meals <ul><li>Leftovers </li></ul><ul><li>Adds and sales </li></ul><ul><li>Season </li></ul><ul><li>Budget </li>...
Planning--When to Shop <ul><li>Shop alone if possible </li></ul><ul><li>When not tired or hungry </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly ...
Planning--Where to Buy <ul><li>Grocery Stores </li></ul><ul><li>Double/triple coupons </li></ul><ul><li>Rain checks </li><...
Consumer Reports Readers Survey--CT <ul><li>Overall Satisfaction with Shopping Experience </li></ul><ul><li>#7 Costco </li...
Where to Buy—Cooperative Food Buying Clubs  <ul><li>Save money on food by sacrificing some free time and convenience  </li...
Where to Buy <ul><li>Warehouse Clubs: </li></ul><ul><li>Sam’s </li></ul><ul><li>BJ’s  </li></ul><ul><li>Costco </li></ul><...
SMART SHOPPING—Cut Your Bill in Half <ul><li>Consumer Report shopper was able to cut his costs by as much as 46% on 30 ite...
SMART SHOPPING <ul><li>Store Brands </li></ul><ul><li>Unit Pricing </li></ul><ul><li>Supermarket traps </li></ul><ul><li>A...
Shopping for Store Brands <ul><li>Store Brands can be 25-35% less </li></ul><ul><li>Lower product development and promotio...
Shopping for Unit Pricing <ul><li>Cost per ounce </li></ul><ul><li>Identify lowest cost package size and brand </li></ul><...
Supermarket Traps <ul><li>100 Calorie packs—cost 16-280% more per ounce </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Tastings </li></ul><ul><l...
Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Beef </li></ul><ul><li>New Value Cuts: Flat Iron, Ranch Cut, Petite Tender, Sirloin Tip Ce...
Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Beef Handouts </li></ul><ul><li>www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.beefnu...
Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Other protein sources </li></ul><ul><li>Organic seafood isn’t worth it. Standards aren’t i...
Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Bread, Cereal, Grains </li></ul><ul><li>Day Old Bread store </li></ul><ul><li>Store-made b...
Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Dairy </li></ul><ul><li>Use powdered or evaporated milk. </li></ul><ul><li>Shred your own ...
Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Fruits and Vegetables </li></ul><ul><li>Cheaper by the bag vs. # </li></ul><ul><li>Save or...
PREPARING MEALS <ul><li>Reduce food waste </li></ul><ul><li>Store food properly </li></ul><ul><li>“ Planned-overs” </li></...
Fast Food vs. Home Prepared <ul><li>¼ # Burger w/ Cheese </li></ul><ul><li>Medium Fries </li></ul><ul><li>Soda </li></ul><...
<ul><li>Go Out and Gather!  </li></ul><ul><li>Be a Wise Shopper and a Savvy Educator </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you NCBA for ...
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Take A Bite Out Of Food Costs 2

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Presented to Connecticut Dietetic Association--October 2009. NCBA sponsor

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  • Next to your housing payments and transportation costs, groceries are probably your largest expense. When money is plentiful many people pay little attention to what they choose at the grocery store and it is easier to eat healthfully. But when money is tight it is more important to pay attention to planning menus in advance, checking adds for specials and for cooking at home.
  • There are a number of new realities when we think about the food and dining preferences of consumers today. Sense of food is global--Most educated, curious and open-minded eaters and cooks Money really matters right now New concept of time—must get food on the table quickly. This concept is what’s pushing consumers toward dining out and purchasing more processed food.
  • Across all income levels, the recession has led Americans to reevaluate their spending and adopt cost-saving strategies. IBM survey this year (2009) of 4000 adults interviewed by telephone found that 72 % of respondents have made &amp;quot;significant spending cuts&amp;quot; because of the economy. While the hardest hit are people who earn $45,000 a year or less, as might be expected, 59 % of those earning $100,000 or more say they&apos;ve cut back too.
  • IBM Survey found that: 63 percent of respondents report they have purposefully changed their grocery shopping behavior in the past two years because they wanted better value for their money. The steps taken to save money most often involve 49%-shopping at more stores to get the best deal, 35% switching grocery stores 53% reducing amount of food purchased 45% of those making less than $20K want foods that keep them full longer The survey found that over the past two years, 77 percent of consumers are demanding transparency and more information about the food they purchase to ensure their safety and that of their families. Want more information about the content of the food products they purchase, including origin of the food which ingredients were used, expiration dates,
  • IBM survey also found that While price is a major factor for 83 percent of respondents, 72 % said that quality is also a top priority. 68% said nutrition is top priority Consumers also said they won’t give up certain important foods such as meat, poultry and…….. (Guy Blissett, consumer products leader for IBM Institute for Business Value. )
  • “ We’d like you to help us with a little research, Ed. We’re going to measure your level of productivity after replacing all of your blood with black coffee.”
  • IBM survey cont. Consumers are reducing spending in certain store aisles but maintaining or even increasing spending in others as they put a lot more thought into the brands they purchase and the type of products they need. When asked how they would spend an extra $10, shoppers said: 13% of individuals (making less than $45K) will purchase more convenient versions of foods they already buy, such as pre-cut vegetables, compared to only 9% of those with a higher income 19% of higher income levels ($45,000 +) are likely to spend their $10 on more natural or organic versions of the items on their shopping list 51% of consumers would most likely purchase more of the items on their shopping list or buy the products in bulk packages 20% of consumers would use their $10 to splurge on an item not on their list Across all segments, the top splurge item are dessert foods
  • How much do families spend annually on food at home? Family of 4 following a Low Cost Meal Plan spends about $7000 per year on food at home compared to $11,400 for a moderate cost meal plan almost #14,000 annually for a liberal cost meal plan. *Note: the nutritional bases of the Food Plans are the 1997-2005 Dietary Reference Intakes, 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans , and 2005 Food Pyramid. All meals and snacks are at home. USDA –Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion
  • USDA This slide confirms what most of us already believe: Lower income families spend a greater % of the income on food (29%) vs. 7% of the highest income. And of that 29% spent on food, 66% is spent on food eaten at home. In other words, as income decreases, consumers spend a greater proportion of the food budget eating at home. This is a positive message for those of us who preach cooking at home to our clients and patients. Note that as income rises, so does the % of the food budget spent on dining out. Not really a surprise.
  • In 2009, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for all food is projected to increase 2-3%, this is lower inflation than the 2008 level. The all food CPI increased 5.5% between 2007 and 2008, the highest annual increase since 1990. reasons 2009 is lower: as lower commodity and energy costs combine with weaker domestic and global economies Food at home prices are forecast to increase 1.5-2.5% while food away from home prices are forecast to increase 3.5 to 4.5 % in 2009.
  • We are seeing a continuous drop in the amount of money farmers are getting from every dollar sold at retail. This could be the change from fresh foods to more processed. The Manufacturers are adding cost thro packaging, processing and transportation.—my thought.
  • Now we are going to discuss ways to cut costs by planning properly. Some review, so will lightly cover those areas
  • Prices can fluctuate 50% over a few months, so you need to keep track of how your top 10 prices fluctuate. Start a Price Book for Your top 10 items to help you: quickly identify true deals stock up when they are at their lowest price. Buy a small notebook . Put each store on a separate page. Write down the product name, package size, price per ounce or unit, store and date . Compare these prices to advertised specials.
  • If you aren’t clipping coupons for items you buy regularly, you are overspending. You could save up to 50% of you grocery bill . That could be a savings of $3000 or more every year . 3 Kinds of Coupons—read slide The average manufacturer&apos;s grocer coupon= $1.08 face value ( according to NCH Marketing –a coupon processing firm ). In 2008,out of 281 billion distributed only 1% (2.6 bil )were redeemed Using coupons doesn’t have to be complicated. Don’t have to be a “Coupon Queen” who spends hours studying sales flyers and organizing coupons to get the best deals every week. Here are some tips to help you get organized and used the coupons you want.
  • Usual scenario— Clip coupons Find coupon and it is out of date Forget coupon Coupon is for different brand Coupon Mom.com has a free 7 page manual on “How to cut Your Grocery bill in Half” Know your prices Use when favorite name brand items hit their lowest price If you clip: organize into broad categories Dairy, canned, boxed, frozen, cleaning, Download &amp; print electronic coupons Manufacturers’ website, coupons.com, smartsource.com Use Coupon Mom “Grocery Coupon Database”—free tool Online database of grocery coupons in Sunday paper Lists every coupon from your state’s primary newspaper RedPlum, SmartSource Write the date the circular came out at the top Website lists item, value, purchase quantity and expiration date Scroll to brand name you want and check the box—then print a list of the coupons you want Go to the appropriate circular and cut out the coupons you need. Receive weekly email updates
  • Discount or Bonus cards . According to Food Marketing Institute Half of retailers offer customers savings through card programs, with discounts such as 2 for one, members only specials, and reward points toward future purchase, money off gas purchases. PROS members only double coupons credit dollars on total spending give the best shoppers something special Big Debate about Value of Discount Cards NBC 10 TV (PN, Del, NJ) consumer alert team compared prices for 3 items at discount club to . prices of same 3 items at stores with no D/C clubs They found that the non-discount stores saved you $22.14. CONS privacy is at risk any time you sign up for anything. retailers up the price of an item and then turn around and offer it at a discounted rate (padding) advocacy groups say this is a way to track an individual’s spending (profiling)
  • Per Consumer Report Sept 2009 p. 7 Higher income middle age women are most likely to apply for rebates Of the 70% who apply, only 80% succeed. They keep good records and are relentless at following directions and monitoring clearing house payments. The main reason for ignoring a rebate offer was that the process can be a chore; fill out one or more forms, provide a receipt (often the original) clip UPC labels or box tops, send all that off by a deadline, wait a month or 2 for a check or debit card. The process is designed to be complicated so refunders give up. But companies say they design it this way to make it harder for con artists to submit phony claims. About.com has a list of phone numbers for the top 21 clearing houses.
  • Plan your menus around: leftovers or items you have to use up weekly store adds that advertise weekly food sales what is in season your budget—even with sales or coupons some foods may not be in your budget food storage capacity at home use an online meal planner (about.com) or a calendar Then using your menu, make a grocery list and stick to it
  • Mom is in an express lane that says 12 items or less. She tells her child “here eat this” Best time to shop —when alone and energized when new promotion week begins Less crowded time—less time weaving thro aisles after re-stocking day Tips are to avoid impulse buying. Shop alone—get out quicker no kids ,or be sure to feed them first. When tired you will buy anything so you can get out quickly. You spend more money if you Are hungry go to the store several times per week. interacting with unplanned items (end of aisle or checkout temptations)
  • There is no perfect store: Consumer Reports magazine did a survey of 32,600 subscribers and found big differences among national and regional chains. Some offered lower prices, some had better meats and produce and some had great service. So choose a store that offers these options: Doubles/triples coupons —for a list in our state go to http://couponing.about.com Read slide
  • How stores in your state were rated for …. overall satisfaction with the shopping experience based on 32,600 responses Shopper Survey. Reported in May 2009 Consumer Reports magazine—for period April 07 to April 08.
  • Cooperatives help you save money by having you provide services to the coop for free. A co-operative is a business (or organization) designed to meet objectives determined by the membership.  Co-ops come in many different shapes and sizes, from daycares, student, agricultural, arts and crafts, housing , insurance, and utilities to large financial co-ops (credit unions).  Food Co-ops ( also known as buying clubs) are a group of people who pool their financial resources in order to purchase bulk foods at wholesale prices. Food coops tend to appeal to those who prefer vegetarian, organic, whole foods or just healthier foods. A coop or buying club can be as small as 5 people or as large as 100. They work together to purchase, pick up, sort, and distribute foods. They also maintain the group so that they can secure wholesale prices on groceries and build a social network with other health-conscious people. There are 2 kinds of coops—read slide. PROS Know where your food comes from Like - minded people, community spirit Supports the market for organics Everyone pays equally and the produce is divided equally CONS Members pay ahead for several weeks worth of groceries at one time. Minimum orders ($300-$600) Possible waste due to quantity purchased or dislike of particular food members work to support the warehouse or coop--requires your time to pick up and sort or distribute foods May need an extra freezer to store foods.
  • Consumer Reports Warehouse clubs make most of their money on membership fees--cost $30-$50 per year. They save you $ by underselling competitors and buying in quantity Deals in warehouse club stores can be impressive, but you have to shop around and compare. For food, you need to weigh the pros and cons of buying bulk items. Do you have enough storage space? Will it remain fresh tasting and of good quality while it is stored? Non-food items many consist of discontinued or gray market items Gray Market – made to be sold abroad at a lower price. It is legal to sell them if bough directly from an authorized source. Gray-market doesn’t mean fakes or knockoffs. They do not come with a manufacturer warranty, but warehouse stores do let you return any item for a refund or exchange with receipt and original packaging.
  • A Consumer Report shopper was able to cut his costs by as much as 46% on 30 items by adjusting his shopping habits: Best deals on perishables and national brands Studied weekly grocery store flyer Searched coupons in Sunday paper, on manufacturer&apos;s web sites and coupon sites Warehouse prices were based on cost per unit, since sizes were large. * Best savings came from careful shopping at a grocery store using store brands
  • Now let’s talk a little about shopping tips. Many of these tips you will already be familiar with so I will focus on some new ideas.
  • Store brands may or may not be the lowest price. More and more stores are putting their own names on their own brands of food. These brands tend to be at least as good as the national brands. Most store brands sell for 25% less on average because they… don’t carry heavy product development and promotion cost. Some stores are developing “second tier” store brands that sell for about 35% less . These names stress “value” or “smart purchases” in the brand name i.e. Value choice
  • Unit cost is on the shelf in front of the product Contains name of food, cost of total package, weight or size of package, cost per unit (usually ounce), bar code for inventory and price. Use unit pricing to identify Lowest cost package--The larger package is usually the cheaper one but not always. Lowest cost brand—store brand or generics Compare different forms of a product
  • Grocery stores are not trying to make your grocery bill less for sure! 100 Calorie Packs—now 136 products vs. 13 in 2004 are misleading because: may not look like the pix on the label—pix may be enlarge product may not be the same product as in the regular size container cost from 16-280% more per ounce than the versions in regular packages, ( (Center for Science in the Public Interest.) Samples temp you to buy Multiples pricing—you may not need to purchase the multiple amount Circular featured products may not be on sale. Circulars increase sales by 500% End Caps (end of Aisle)—most consumers assume items are on sale—some may be &amp; some may not can boost sales by 1/3. temptations not on your list and increase food expenses. could also be highlighting items about to expire. Check Out Line Temptations: c. Tell story about new test on check-out lines with no candy for kids. Moms struggle to keep kids from putting candy in the cart and then when they get to the check-out they are bombarded with more candy. Check register receipt for accuracy—6% were overcharged (2008 survey) Multiple locations for an item: ---sliced Swiss cheese — on sale at the deli for $6.99 per pound with a bonus card --in the refrig case $5.58 per pound without a card. --block of same cheese $4.69/#
  • These new cuts are the result of an innovative cutting approach pioneered by the beef industry. They are moderately priced and have been carefully selected for their palatability, tenderness and flavor. New Value Cuts: Flat Iron, Ranch Cut, Petite Tender, Sirloin Tip Center or Side, Western Griller, Bottom Round. 80% lean ground beef –then rinse Stock up when at low cost, wrap properly and freeze Buy steaks or roasts and cut as needed into cubes or strips. Or cut your own steaks from a roast. Look for cost per serving, not the price per pound . The amount of beef you need will vary with each cut. Cooking yields are related to the amount of bone, fat trim and cooking method. Match the cut with the cooking method.
  • Read slide Beans are inexpensive, versatile and a great source of protein and fiber.
  • Read slide
  • Use powdered or evaporated milk. Shred your own cheese Freeze cheese for later if on sale. Largest milk container-- larger cartons aregenerally cheaper when you compare the price per ounce. Switch to skim--A family of 4 who changes from whole milk to non-fat milk could save $8 to $11 per week and also cut calories and fat. Add your own fruit to yogurt
  • Bagged produce is usually a better buy especially if it has a long shelf life like potatoes or apples. But of course watch out for the 20# bags. Save organic for those most high in pesticides such as: APPLES, BELL PEPPERS, CELERY, CHERRIES, IMPORTED GRAPES, NECTARINES, PEACHES, PEARS, POTATOES, RED RASPBERRIES, SPINACH, STRAWBERRIES. (Top 10 according to environmental working group.)
  • I know you all are familiar with meal planning techniques. The next slide demonstrated that convenience cost more than home cooked.
  • Typical fast food meal costs at least $5.00 This slide demonstrated that it is possible to save over half by preparing food at home. Let your patients and clients know that they will also be saving fat, sodium and calories.
  • Go out and gather!!! Be a wise shopper and savvy educator Thanks you NCBA
  • Take A Bite Out Of Food Costs 2

    1. 1. Take a Bite Out of Food Costs Linda Farr RD/LD [email_address] 210-735-2402
    2. 2. Desired Outcomes <ul><li>Participants will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify new food and dining trends </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss changing consumer habits </li></ul><ul><li>Identify which income level is hardest hit by rising food cost </li></ul><ul><li>List ways to cut food cost through savvy planning, shopping and preparing </li></ul>
    3. 3. New Food and Dining Realities
    4. 4. Spending Cuts Across All Incomes <ul><li>72% have made significant cuts </li></ul><ul><li>Hardest Hit: $45 K a year or less </li></ul><ul><li>59% of $100 K a year--cut back </li></ul>
    5. 5. Changing Consumer Habits <ul><li>63% are more flexible about where to shop and what brands to buy </li></ul><ul><li>49% shopping at more stores for best deal </li></ul><ul><li>35% switching grocery stores </li></ul><ul><li>53% reducing amount of food purchased </li></ul><ul><li>45% of those making less than $20K want foods that keep them full longer </li></ul><ul><li>77% want more information about the content and origin of foods </li></ul>
    6. 6. Consumer Priorities <ul><li>3 in 4 Americans choose quality and nutritional value over lowest price </li></ul><ul><li>72% Quality over price </li></ul><ul><li>68% Nutrition is most important </li></ul><ul><li>Won’t give up meat, poultry and ……. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Coffee……….!
    8. 8. Consumer Splurges with $10 more <ul><li>13% (less than $45K) Convenience, compared to only 9% of those with a higher income </li></ul><ul><li>19% ($45K +) Natural or Organic </li></ul><ul><li>51% More of items they normally buy (buy in bulk) </li></ul><ul><li>20% New item not on their list </li></ul><ul><li>#1 Splurge----Dessert </li></ul>
    9. 9. Family of Four—Food Cost at Home <ul><li>  Thrift Cost Plan Low Cost Plan Moderate Cost Plan Liberal Cost Plan </li></ul><ul><li>    </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly: $584 $760 $949 $1,154 </li></ul><ul><li>Annually: $7000 $9100 $11,400 $13,850 </li></ul><ul><li>USDA—Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.cnpp.usda.gov </li></ul>
    10. 10. Food Purchases as a % of Income <ul><li> AVG INCOME LOWEST 20 % MIDDLE 20 % HIGHEST 20 %     </li></ul><ul><li>Income after taxes $60,858 $10,534 $ 45,179 $150,927     </li></ul><ul><li>Food as % of income 10% 29% 13% 7%     </li></ul><ul><li>Food at home 56% 66% 59% 50% </li></ul><ul><li>Food away from home 44% 34% 41% 50%         </li></ul>
    11. 11. CPI--Projections for Food Prices in 2009 <ul><li>All Food—up 2-3% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5.5% in 2007-2008 (highest increase since 1990) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Food at Home—up 1.5-2.5% </li></ul><ul><li>Food Away from Home—3.5-4.5% </li></ul>
    12. 12. Percentage of Retail Price Staying with Farmer <ul><li>For every dollar sold at retail… </li></ul><ul><li>1960-- 33%   </li></ul><ul><li>1970-- 32%   </li></ul><ul><li>1980-- 31%   </li></ul><ul><li>1990-- 24%   </li></ul><ul><li>2000-- 19%     </li></ul>
    13. 13. PLANNING TO SHOP <ul><li>Price Your Top 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Coupons </li></ul><ul><li>Discount or Bonus Cards </li></ul><ul><li>Rebates/Refunding </li></ul><ul><li>Meal Planning </li></ul><ul><li>When to Shop </li></ul><ul><li>8. Where to Buy </li></ul>
    14. 14. Planning—Start a Price Book <ul><li>Buy a small notebook </li></ul><ul><li>Put each store on a separate page </li></ul><ul><li>Write down the </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Product name, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Package size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Price per ounce or unit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Store </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Date </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Compare these prices to advertised specials . </li></ul>
    15. 15. Planning--Coupons <ul><li>Manufacturer—Avg. $1.08 face value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>National coupon inserts in newspapers, direct-mailers, magazines, package inserts, thro surveys, mail-in forms, accompany samples </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturer pays the face value of the coupon directly to the store </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Red plum, SmartSource, P&G, Kraft </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Send thank you or complaint letters—receive free coupons </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Retailer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Posted in store newspaper ads, thro direct mail, or in local newsletters. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturer offers an advertising allowance to the store to cover advertising and mailing expense </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Online </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On websites of manufacturers and grocery stores which can be printed and used in the store. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shortcuts.com </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Coupon Tips—CouponMom.com System <ul><li>Know your prices </li></ul><ul><li>Use when favorite name brand items hit their lowest price </li></ul><ul><li>If you clip: organize into broad categories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dairy, canned, boxed, frozen, cleaning, </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Download & print electronic coupons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturers’ website, coupons.com, smartsource.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use Coupon Mom “Grocery Coupon Database”—free tool </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Online database of grocery coupons in Sunday paper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lists every coupon from your state’s primary newspaper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>RedPlum, SmartSource </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Write the date the circular came out at the top </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Website lists item, value, purchase quantity and expiration date </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scroll to brand name you want and check the box—then print a list of the coupons you want </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Go to the appropriate circular and cut out the coupons you need. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Receive weekly email updates </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Planning--Discount or Bonus Cards <ul><li>PROs </li></ul><ul><li>members only double coupons </li></ul><ul><li>credit dollars on total spending </li></ul><ul><li>give the best shoppers something special </li></ul><ul><li>CONs </li></ul><ul><li>privacy is at risk any time you sign up for anything. </li></ul><ul><li>retailers up the price of an item and then turn around and offer it at a discounted rate (padding) </li></ul><ul><li>advocacy groups say this is a way to track an individual’s spending—(profiling) </li></ul>
    18. 18. Planning--Rebates/Refunding <ul><li>Income $100K or more, age 35-64 women are most likely to apply </li></ul><ul><li>Income $50K or less are least likely to apply for rebates </li></ul><ul><li>70% have taken advantage of manufacturer rebates </li></ul><ul><li>80% of those succeed </li></ul><ul><li>Keep good records </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Date sent in </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Date should have received </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phone number of clearing house </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Be Relentless! </li></ul><ul><li>Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Process is a chore </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of steps with potential for error and rejection due to technicality </li></ul><ul><li>Missed Deadlines </li></ul><ul><li>Slow payment </li></ul><ul><li>Check or debit card may look like junk mail </li></ul><ul><li>Process designed to make it so complicated that the refunder gives up </li></ul>
    19. 19. Planning--Meals <ul><li>Leftovers </li></ul><ul><li>Adds and sales </li></ul><ul><li>Season </li></ul><ul><li>Budget </li></ul><ul><li>Storage </li></ul><ul><li>Then make grocery list </li></ul>
    20. 20. Planning--When to Shop <ul><li>Shop alone if possible </li></ul><ul><li>When not tired or hungry </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly or less often </li></ul><ul><li>When store is less crowded </li></ul><ul><li>Wednesday AM--when new promotion week begins and most fresh produce has been restocked </li></ul>
    21. 21. Planning--Where to Buy <ul><li>Grocery Stores </li></ul><ul><li>Double/triple coupons </li></ul><ul><li>Rain checks </li></ul><ul><li>Stores that charge half price for each item when “buy one, get one free” is advertised </li></ul><ul><li>Stores that have email newsletter coupons or mail coupons </li></ul><ul><li>Give bonus gift cards for bringing in a new RX or RX transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Accept competitor’s coupons </li></ul><ul><li>Allow “stacking” manufacturer’s coupon with store coupon </li></ul><ul><li>Ask for discounts on damaged items </li></ul>
    22. 22. Consumer Reports Readers Survey--CT <ul><li>Overall Satisfaction with Shopping Experience </li></ul><ul><li>#7 Costco </li></ul><ul><li>#22 ShopRite </li></ul><ul><li>#38 Sam’s Club </li></ul><ul><li>#42 BJ’s Wholesale Club </li></ul><ul><li>#48 Stop & Shop </li></ul><ul><li>#56 Walmart Supercenter </li></ul><ul><li>#57 Shaw’s </li></ul>
    23. 23. Where to Buy—Cooperative Food Buying Clubs <ul><li>Save money on food by sacrificing some free time and convenience </li></ul><ul><li>1) Cooperative Warehouse </li></ul><ul><li>may require membership fee, credit check, minimum orders </li></ul><ul><li>supply food to retail co-ops & buying groups </li></ul><ul><li>provides technical assistance to start food cooperatives </li></ul><ul><li>owned and controlled by the local cooperative they service </li></ul><ul><li>Buying Club Co-op </li></ul><ul><li>want access to affordable healthy food, in line with their value system (packaging, local, organic, small business) </li></ul><ul><li>increased buying power </li></ul><ul><li>involves ordering, picking up the items, sorting, distributing and maintaining the group. </li></ul>
    24. 24. Where to Buy <ul><li>Warehouse Clubs: </li></ul><ul><li>Sam’s </li></ul><ul><li>BJ’s </li></ul><ul><li>Costco </li></ul><ul><li>Make most of money on membership fees and underselling competitors by buying in quantity </li></ul><ul><li>Discounts as much as 61% on non-food items </li></ul><ul><li>Lack variety </li></ul><ul><li>Some discontinued, gray market or close-out non-food items </li></ul><ul><li>Stores guarantee and allow returns. </li></ul>
    25. 25. SMART SHOPPING—Cut Your Bill in Half <ul><li>Consumer Report shopper was able to cut his costs by as much as 46% on 30 items by adjusting his shopping habits. </li></ul><ul><li>Impulsive Shopper $136.47 </li></ul><ul><li>Savvy Shopper $73.55 </li></ul><ul><li>Warehouse Club Shopper $60.49 </li></ul><ul><li>Store-Brand Shopper $60.25 </li></ul>
    26. 26. SMART SHOPPING <ul><li>Store Brands </li></ul><ul><li>Unit Pricing </li></ul><ul><li>Supermarket traps </li></ul><ul><li>Aisle by Aisle Tips </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beef </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other Protein </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bread, Cereal, Grains </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fruit and Vegetables </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Shopping for Store Brands <ul><li>Store Brands can be 25-35% less </li></ul><ul><li>Lower product development and promotion costs </li></ul>
    28. 28. Shopping for Unit Pricing <ul><li>Cost per ounce </li></ul><ul><li>Identify lowest cost package size and brand </li></ul><ul><li>Compare different forms (frozen, canned, fresh) </li></ul><ul><li>Take calculator if no unit price </li></ul><ul><li>Can you store it properly? </li></ul>
    29. 29. Supermarket Traps <ul><li>100 Calorie packs—cost 16-280% more per ounce </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Tastings </li></ul><ul><li>Multiples pricing </li></ul><ul><li>Circulars--featured products in may not be on sale--can increase sales by 500%. </li></ul><ul><li>End of Aisle—increase sales by 33% </li></ul><ul><li>Check out line temptations </li></ul><ul><li>Check the receipt for accuracy—6% were overcharged </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple location of items– deli vs. shelf </li></ul>
    30. 30. Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Beef </li></ul><ul><li>New Value Cuts: Flat Iron, Ranch Cut, Petite Tender, Sirloin Tip Center or Side, Western Griller, Bottom Round. </li></ul><ul><li>80% lean ground beef –then rinse </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stock up, wrap properly and freeze </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Buy steaks or roast and cut as needed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look for cost per serving </li></ul></ul>
    31. 31. Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Beef Handouts </li></ul><ul><li>www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.beefnutrition.org </li></ul><ul><li>“ How Much to Buy” Guidelines (servings /#) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Match Cooking Methods to Beef Cuts” </li></ul>
    32. 32. Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Other protein sources </li></ul><ul><li>Organic seafood isn’t worth it. Standards aren’t in place </li></ul><ul><li>Get a whole chicken or turkey </li></ul><ul><li>Beans </li></ul><ul><li>Eggs </li></ul><ul><li>Peanut butter </li></ul>
    33. 33. Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Bread, Cereal, Grains </li></ul><ul><li>Day Old Bread store </li></ul><ul><li>Store-made baked goods may be less than commercial alternatives </li></ul><ul><li>Bagged cereals </li></ul><ul><li>Bread Machine </li></ul><ul><li>Longer cooking oatmeal, unseasoned rice, popcorn </li></ul><ul><li>Homemade croutons </li></ul>
    34. 34. Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Dairy </li></ul><ul><li>Use powdered or evaporated milk. </li></ul><ul><li>Shred your own cheese </li></ul><ul><li>Freeze cheese for later if on sale. </li></ul><ul><li>Largest milk container </li></ul><ul><li>Switch to skim </li></ul><ul><li>Add your own fruit to yogurt </li></ul>
    35. 35. Shopping Aisle by Aisle <ul><li>Fruits and Vegetables </li></ul><ul><li>Cheaper by the bag vs. # </li></ul><ul><li>Save organic for those most high in pesticides </li></ul><ul><li>Buy uncut </li></ul><ul><li>Go frozen when out of season </li></ul><ul><li>Go Local </li></ul><ul><li>Private label store brands </li></ul><ul><li>Plant a garden </li></ul>
    36. 36. PREPARING MEALS <ul><li>Reduce food waste </li></ul><ul><li>Store food properly </li></ul><ul><li>“ Planned-overs” </li></ul><ul><li>Make your own spice blends </li></ul><ul><li>Convenience vs. Home Cooked </li></ul>
    37. 37. Fast Food vs. Home Prepared <ul><li>¼ # Burger w/ Cheese </li></ul><ul><li>Medium Fries </li></ul><ul><li>Soda </li></ul><ul><li>Fast Food Home Prepared </li></ul><ul><li>$2.69 $1.27 </li></ul><ul><li>$1.00 $. 27 </li></ul><ul><li>$1.50 $. 17 </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>$5.19 $2.08 </li></ul><ul><li>*Medium Meal Deal at $4.68 = </li></ul><ul><li>2 home prepared burgers </li></ul>
    38. 38. <ul><li>Go Out and Gather! </li></ul><ul><li>Be a Wise Shopper and a Savvy Educator </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you NCBA for your sponsorship! </li></ul><ul><li>Linda Farr RD/LD </li></ul><ul><li>www.NutritiousTable.com </li></ul><ul><li>210-735-2402 </li></ul>

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