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North america

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North america

  1. 1. LOCATION:  North America covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the Earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface. North America is the third-largest continent by area, following Asia and Africa, and the fourth by population after Asia, Africa, and Europe. In 2013, its population was estimated at nearly 579 million people in 23 independent states, or about 7.5% of the world's population.
  2. 2. BOUNDARIES:  It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. North America is dominated by its three largest countries: Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Central America and the Caribbean are usually considered part of North America, but they have their own section here.
  3. 3. POLITICAL DIVISIONS:  North America can be divided into five physical regions: the mountainous west, the Great Plains, the Canadian Shield, the varied eastern region, and the Caribbean. Mexico and Central America's western coast are connected to the mountainous west, while its lowlands and coastal plains extend into the eastern region.
  4. 4. THE WESTERN CORDILLERAS:  The North American Cordillera, sometimes also called the Western Cordillera of North America, the Western Cordillera or the Pacific Cordillera, is the North American portion of the American Cordillera, the mountain chain system (cordillera) along the western coast (Pacific coast) of the Americas.
  5. 5. PHYSICAL MAP
  6. 6. THE CANADIAN SHEILD:  The Canadian Shield also called the Laurentian Plateau, is a large area of exposed Precambrian igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks (geologic shield) that forms the ancient geologic core of the North American continent (the North American Craton or Laurentia). Glaciation has left the area with only a thin layer of soil, through which the composition of igneous rock resulting from long volcanic history is frequently visible.
  7. 7. THE APALACHIAN MOUNTAINS  The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps and the rocks Mountains before experiencing natural erosion. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east–west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east–west.

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