Health Games Research National Program:Discoveries and Game Design Principles            from Our Grantees Research     Pr...
Announcement:Health Games Research Databasewww.healthgamesresearch.org/db   Inclusive database: Games, Publications, Reso...
Our 21 Health Games Research grantees   Universities and medical centers   Multi-disciplinary       Medicine       Kin...
Grantees’ games   Physical activity games and self-care games   Custom created games and off-the-shelf games   Platform...
Goals of grantee research   Outcome studies: Did the game work? Did health behaviors    change immediately and over time?...
Crazy Taxi – University of Florida                            Off-the-shelf game                            Helps senior...
Mindless Eating Challenge – Cornell                          Mobile game                          Helps teens improve   ...
Cornell: Geri Gay   Mindless Eating Challenge   Adolescents – problem with breakfast nutrition   Mobile phone and virtu...
Georgetown University: Sandy Calvert   Exergames at school for inner city students   Competitive vs. cooperative play – ...
Maine Medical Center: Ann Maloney   DDR for overweight children and their families   Generally found increased physical ...
Michigan State University: Deborah Feltz   Buddy Up; partnered exergames   College student participants   Virtually-pre...
Michigan State University: Wei Peng   Active games for children, using upper and lower    body exertion to control charac...
Michigan State University: Wei Peng   Self-Determination Theory: Design the exergames to satisfy    needs for autonomy an...
Seniors Cybercycling
Seniors Cybercycling
Union College: Cay Anderson-Hanley   Seniors Cybercycling   Randomized trial of older adults in senior living centers  ...
University of North Carolina: Deborah Tate   Exergames: entertainment games vs. exercise-themed   Young adults ages 18-3...
University of Southern California: Maja Mataric   Robot Motivator   Human torso robot leads an older adult in upper-body...
Future plans for grantee research findings   Publicize the findings and principles of health game    design – many more w...
Thank you!And check out our DATABASE!   Debra Lieberman, Erica Biely,    Susana Peinado, Chan Thai      wwwhealthgamesrese...
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Discoveries and Game Design Principles from Our Grantees' Research, Lieberman, 6-13-12

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Presentation by Debra Lieberman at the 2012 Games for Health Conference

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Discoveries and Game Design Principles from Our Grantees' Research, Lieberman, 6-13-12

  1. 1. Health Games Research National Program:Discoveries and Game Design Principles from Our Grantees Research Presentation to the Games for Health Conference Boston, MA Debra Lieberman, Erica Biely, Susana Peinado, Chan Thai UC Santa Barbara June 13, 2012
  2. 2. Announcement:Health Games Research Databasewww.healthgamesresearch.org/db Inclusive database: Games, Publications, Resources, Organizations, Events Easier to use and more powerful searches Keyword, Category, or Topic Recommended content you might like Log in for “My Dashboard”  New to You, Favorites, Saved Searches Recommendation Forms – Suggest new items, correct existing items, provide feedback
  3. 3. Our 21 Health Games Research grantees Universities and medical centers Multi-disciplinary  Medicine  Kinesiology  Public Health and health promotion  Psychology  Communication  Cinema studies  Engineering
  4. 4. Grantees’ games Physical activity games and self-care games Custom created games and off-the-shelf games Platforms  Computer, various consoles and interfaces (such as controller, dance pad, Kinect, Wii balance board)  Mobile phone (two games with web connections, another with microphone and breath as interface)  Robots  Cybercycles  Alternate reality game
  5. 5. Goals of grantee research Outcome studies: Did the game work? Did health behaviors change immediately and over time? Did health outcomes improve? Clinical utilization? Theory testing – How and why did the game work? Many studies assessed usage, implementation strategies, engagement, satisfaction, and perceived game quality and usefulness Outcomes of game vs. treatment-as-usual Principles of health game design – translate findings into strategies for future health game design
  6. 6. Crazy Taxi – University of Florida  Off-the-shelf game  Helps seniors learn to focus attention and ignore distractions  Effective form of therapy in the clinic and as leisure-time entertainment to stay cognitively sharp
  7. 7. Mindless Eating Challenge – Cornell  Mobile game  Helps teens improve breakfast nutrition  Choose your pet to nurture via your own healthy eating
  8. 8. Cornell: Geri Gay Mindless Eating Challenge Adolescents – problem with breakfast nutrition Mobile phone and virtual pet game Take a picture of your breakfast and send it to your pet – so your nutrition feeds your pet Outcomes:  Better breakfast nutrition and more likely to eat breakfast  Stronger effects if player sees pet thriving and being ill (negative feedback )(compared to thriving or neutral only)  More enjoyment, attachment to pet, and nutrition attitude change when negative feedback is included
  9. 9. Georgetown University: Sandy Calvert Exergames at school for inner city students Competitive vs. cooperative play – Wii Competitive play improved executive functioning more, and led to more physical exertion during game play
  10. 10. Maine Medical Center: Ann Maloney DDR for overweight children and their families Generally found increased physical activity when DDR went to the home
  11. 11. Michigan State University: Deborah Feltz Buddy Up; partnered exergames College student participants Virtually-presented partner in conjunctive tasks Partner should be moderately more skillful than the player, to increase player exertion
  12. 12. Michigan State University: Wei Peng Active games for children, using upper and lower body exertion to control characters in an adventure game Increased energy expenditure and effort
  13. 13. Michigan State University: Wei Peng Self-Determination Theory: Design the exergames to satisfy needs for autonomy and competence Autonomy-supportive games – ability to customize characters, select how characters will grow in skills, select messages to convey to game characters Competence-supportive games – dynamic difficulty level, heroism meter, achievement badges Autonomy-supportive games more strongly increase game enjoyment and motivation to exercise Competence-supportive games more strongly increase game enjoyment, motivation to exercise, and self-efficacy for physical activity
  14. 14. Seniors Cybercycling
  15. 15. Seniors Cybercycling
  16. 16. Union College: Cay Anderson-Hanley Seniors Cybercycling Randomized trial of older adults in senior living centers Virtual biking, with interesting locations to bike in Racing against personal best time, against others, against virtual competitors; race alone or in teams Cognitive benefits of interactive decision-making and physical activity:  Improved executive function  Reduced risk of progressing to mild cognitive impairment
  17. 17. University of North Carolina: Deborah Tate Exergames: entertainment games vs. exercise-themed Young adults ages 18-35 Exercise-themed games were less fun but led to more physical exertion Dilemma for designing exergames: entertainment theme or exercise theme? Use entertainment theme for unmotivated people, to attract them to the fun of the game Motivated people may prefer exercise theme so they can focus on physical activity as their goal
  18. 18. University of Southern California: Maja Mataric Robot Motivator Human torso robot leads an older adult in upper-body exercises by demonstrating the movements Robot presents a game:  Asks player to repeat a series of demonstrated movements  Sees the player and gives feedback on accuracy Relational condition – where the robot establishes social connection, gives praise, refers to user by name – was more effective in motivating exercise and users liked it more
  19. 19. Future plans for grantee research findings Publicize the findings and principles of health game design – many more will be published soon Reach a variety of constituencies / decision-makers  Health care providers, insurers, educators  Game designers, publishers  Researchers  Funders, foundations, federal agencies, investors Help develop new norms among our constituents:  Game designers: use theory and evidence as the foundation, and conduct outcome studies to demonstrate effectiveness  Purchasers, users: demand evidence, quality, outcome studies
  20. 20. Thank you!And check out our DATABASE! Debra Lieberman, Erica Biely, Susana Peinado, Chan Thai wwwhealthgamesresearch.orgDatabase: wwwhealthgamesresearch.org/db lieberma@isber.ucsb.edu

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