Melissa Cornwell
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Information Literacy Summit
April 2013
 “Active learning can be defined as
anything that „involves students in doing
things and thinking about what they‟re
doin...
 “The affective domain comprises a person‟s
attitudes, emotions, interests, motivation,
self-efficacy, and values” (Schro...
 Creativity is defined as “the ability to
generate new ideas and new
connections between ideas, and ways
to solve problem...
 “Creativity and curiosity are highly
personal experiences and learning is
about the individual, not the group”
(Hensley,...
 Creativity can help the students to think
about what they‟re doing.
 Ways to spark creativity (based on the
definition ...
 Defining your topic
 Developing a research strategy
 Conducting searches for information
 Evaluating your resources
...
 Idea-mapping is the “process of writing
down ideas in a way that helps you see
new relationships and possibilities”
(Rub...
 Please break up into groups of 3-4 people.
 Choose a word cloud creation tool to
experiment with (please see the handou...
 What did you think about using the word
clouds for brainstorming topics for the
research project?
 Is it too simple or ...
 It can help organize ideas and see
relationships between different ideas
and topics.
 It provides a visual image that t...
 Hensley, Randy Burke. "Curiosity and Creativity as
Attributes of Information Literacy." Reference & User
Services Quarte...
 North Carolina State University Libraries. "The Research Process: The
Five Steps." n.d. Developing Research Skills: The ...
 Any Questions?
 Please email me at
mcornwell88@gmail.com if you have
any questions or would like a copy of this
present...
Information Literacy Summit Presentation
Information Literacy Summit Presentation
Information Literacy Summit Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Information Literacy Summit Presentation

404 views

Published on

I presented this presentation at the Information Literacy Summit in Carterville, Illinois on April 16, 2013.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
404
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
148
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • “Many techniques can be used to get the students involved, including ``experientiallearning, cooperative learning, problem-solving exercises, writing tasks, speaking activities,class discussion, case-study methods, simulations, role-playing, peer teaching, fieldwork,independent study, library assignments, computer-aided instruction, and homework” (Keyser, 36).
  • Looked outside the traditional definition of creativity and ways to get creative
  • Use Word Clouds to Help Students Brainstorm for their Research Topics!
  • Provide 15-20 minutes for this! Write group ideas on the board
  • Information Literacy Summit Presentation

    1. 1. Melissa Cornwell University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Information Literacy Summit April 2013
    2. 2.  “Active learning can be defined as anything that „involves students in doing things and thinking about what they‟re doing” (Keyser, 36).  Active learning goes beyond the lecture.  It may involve a metacognition process, or thinking about thinking.  There are many different techniques that can be used to get the students involved.
    3. 3.  “The affective domain comprises a person‟s attitudes, emotions, interests, motivation, self-efficacy, and values” (Schroeder and Cahoy, 129).  Why does this matter? › “Affect plays a large role in college students‟ relationship to libraries and the research process” (Schroeder and Cahoy, 131).  The emotions that students feel throughout the research process have an impact on their ability to process information.
    4. 4.  Creativity is defined as “the ability to generate new ideas and new connections between ideas, and ways to solve problems in any field or realm of our lives” (Public Broadcasting Service).  What other ideas come to mind when we talk about creativity?
    5. 5.  “Creativity and curiosity are highly personal experiences and learning is about the individual, not the group” (Hensley, 33).  Why is creativity important? › It has been linked to creating positive emotions and overall satisfaction. › Creativity encourages students to follow their interests.
    6. 6.  Creativity can help the students to think about what they‟re doing.  Ways to spark creativity (based on the definition of creativity as the ability to generate ideas) : › Take notes › Gather and capture new ideas › Find inspiration in other areas of life › Idea-mapping
    7. 7.  Defining your topic  Developing a research strategy  Conducting searches for information  Evaluating your resources  Citing your resources
    8. 8.  Idea-mapping is the “process of writing down ideas in a way that helps you see new relationships and possibilities” (Rubin).  Use idea-mapping to help with the first part of the research process!  Examples of idea-mapping include:  Concept maps  Flowcharts  Post-It Notes on Whiteboard
    9. 9.  Please break up into groups of 3-4 people.  Choose a word cloud creation tool to experiment with (please see the handout).  Pretend that you‟re the students! Each group should come up with a broad topic, and using the word cloud creation tool, create a word cloud with both broad and specific topics and sub-topics.
    10. 10.  What did you think about using the word clouds for brainstorming topics for the research project?  Is it too simple or too difficult?  Does creating word clouds fit the definitions of both active learning and creativity?  How could we make this exercise so that it speaks to the affective domain?
    11. 11.  It can help organize ideas and see relationships between different ideas and topics.  It provides a visual image that the student could continue to consult throughout the research process.  The student can focus on the content and not worry about the layout.
    12. 12.  Hensley, Randy Burke. "Curiosity and Creativity as Attributes of Information Literacy." Reference & User Services Quarterly 44.1 (2004): 31-6. 29 January 2013.  Keyser, Marcia W. "Active learning and cooperative learning: understanding the difference and using both styles effectively." Research Strategies 17.1 (2000): 35-44. 24 January 2013.  "Learning Services: The Research Process - 5 Steps to Success." 1 July 2009. The University of Auckland: Libraries and Learning Services. 4 April 2013. <http://www.library.auckland.ac.nz/instruct/research .htm>.
    13. 13.  North Carolina State University Libraries. "The Research Process: The Five Steps." n.d. Developing Research Skills: The Research Process. 4 April 2013. <http://support.library.ewu.edu/reference/tutorial/rskills/les1/steps. html>.  Public Broadcasting Service . "Creativity." 2011. This Emotional Life. 4 April 2013. <http://www.pbs.org/thisemotionallife/topic/creativity/creativity>.  Rubin, Gretchen. "7 Tips for Sparking Your Creativity." 24 July 2010. Care2. 4 April 2013. <http://www.care2.com/greenliving/7-tips-for- sparking-your-creativity.html>.  Schroeder, Robert and Ellysa Stern Cahoy. "Valuing Information Literacy: Affective Learning and the ACRL Standards." portal: Libraries and the Academy 10.2 (2010): 127-46.
    14. 14.  Any Questions?  Please email me at mcornwell88@gmail.com if you have any questions or would like a copy of this presentation.

    ×