Online Content CurationDaniel WilkschPublic Record Office Victoria
• what have we got?• how are we making use of it?– developing themes and designing projects• engaging our community• susta...
Public Record Office Victoria• We are the archives for thestate of Victoria, establishedunder the Public Records Act1973.•...
Public records:• are records created or received by governmentofficials as they do their jobs.• may be products of adminis...
we have documented• around 4,500 government agencies• over 17,000 recordkeeping series• over 90 (shelf) km of paper, photo...
Jedi archives(Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, 2002)
secret vatican archivesAngels and Demons, 2006
archives of Gondor(The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001)
archives of Gondor(The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001)where’s his gloves?don’t crumple the2,000 year oldmanuscript!is this t...
MI6 archives (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, 2012)
sourcesEdward Kelly to Sergeant Babington1870VPS 937/P0, unit 272
evidenceMeeting notice used in EurekaStockade treason trialsVPRS 5527/P0, unit 4
factsPolice Muster Rolls, 1878VPRS 55/P0, unit 8School Inspector’s Notebooks,Avenel PS, 30 March 1864VPRS 9864/P0, unit 1
storiesPage from inquest into Edward Kelly’sdeath, 1880VPRS 24/P0, unit 411
however…
defining termsDigital curation• is the selection, preservation, maintenance,collection and archiving of digital assets.– W...
to curate• select, organize, and present (suitable content, typically for online orcomputational use), using professional ...
the map is not the territory– Alfred Korzybski• curating and cataloguing• individual records and ‘datasets’• information a...
this is real• the conversations aren’t ephemeral• privacy and sensitivity considerations whenworking over the internet• wo...
exposing the highlights• Just a few records or a well-known story• marketing, even branding the organisation• addresses th...
http://prov.vic.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/disaster-at-west-gat
degustation• introduces record types• mixture of ‘useful’ background history for researchand some highlight records• recor...
follow the trail• linking names, dates, places across records.• showcases family history research (but mostresearch is abo...
thrill of the chase• meant as a more complete resource around atopic. a mini-archive• interactivity and excitement• but al...
records and narrative• viewers may need tools and context(handwriting recognition, 19th-centurybureaucracy)• as little ext...
finding themes• strange and familiardoes this exhibition help the audience make senseof their own world or someone else’s?...
working with your community• what are you trying to produce?• where do you fit in the process?
working with your peers• content as ‘currency’but also• stories are shared
education• teachers need packages to slot into curricula
sustainability• marry curation to catalogue, but• separate discussion from resource• persistent URLs, but• expect to migra...
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV
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Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV

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Daniel Wilksch, Coordinator, Digital Projects, Public Record Office Victoria (PROV), discusses the digital strategy of the PROV and the ways they have made their existing collections into new and exciting online exhibitions to excite and engage users. Daniel will discuss balancing the need for presenting curated records and stories with attention to whole-of-collection data, and how the PROV have become world renown for their web architecture and online strategy

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  • Some basic info about PROV The Public Record Office of Victoria is responsible for the preservation of state government records that are classified as permanent for retention for historical, genealogical or other research and records that document the status, rights and entitlements of Victorians
  • On first thought, public records may not seem to be relevant to family and local history. However, wherever government functions and processes intersect with individual’s lives, records are created. Many of them will reveal information about a person’s life – these are records created by government departments and authorities, State Courts, municipalities, schools, public hospitals and other public offices. They date from the mid 1830s onwards and contain a wealth of information on subjects such as immigration, land, education, health, prisons and public buildings.
  • (eg digitising Prison Registers) DW will talk more about putting the collection online Creating images inside and outside the catalogue are quite different
  • ‘ PROV is a good example of how to showcase forgotten material’
  • This could be shipping lists, rate books or any umber of other registers. A lot of what we hold is about verifying names, dates and places.
  • All of this adds together to make a narrative
  • meet our catalogue. you have to dig to find the good stuff.
  • curating past ‘ publishing’ to the web (we had online exhibitions before we had an online catalogue) curating future web 2.0, crowdsourcing semantic web, large scale content sharing I’m going to be using the older sense of curation a lot. Partly because you’ll hera better speakers on the use of social media than me, partly because we feel one of our issues is that our material generally needs to be dige4sted before it can be shared (yuck).
  • the interenet is very versatile, but it basically reduces to cotnetn on pages. generally one page= one idea
  • we can do interesting. But to do really interesting takes some work. What I want to do for the rest of the talk is look at how we approach turning our material into the kind of content that works with the internet.
  • Our particular problem: archives are information resources not storytellers. Where we put our resources is a big internal discussion for us. We need to have a focus on the whole collection, but the way people engage with us is by picking out individual topics and interests. This is curation in the online sense, you notice. Our staff tend to operate in the same way. They become subject matter experts and apply those filters to the stream of records that pass through their hands.
  • Nellie Melba and culture victoria volunteers and digitising projects More of an issue for us because there is a public trust elelment to what we do.
  • So let’s jump to some actual advice. valuable for the younger educational audience
  • cemetery registers printed letterhead
  • eg. you bring the stoies, we bring the proof. what are you an expert in?
  • Content Curation by Daniel Wilksch, PROV

    1. 1. Online Content CurationDaniel WilkschPublic Record Office Victoria
    2. 2. • what have we got?• how are we making use of it?– developing themes and designing projects• engaging our community• sustainability
    3. 3. Public Record Office Victoria• We are the archives for thestate of Victoria, establishedunder the Public Records Act1973.• We are responsible formanaging and providingaccess to public records.
    4. 4. Public records:• are records created or received by governmentofficials as they do their jobs.• may be products of administrative processes (eg.wills) or they may document functions ofgovernment (eg. annual reports).• are unique and have evidential value.
    5. 5. we have documented• around 4,500 government agencies• over 17,000 recordkeeping series• over 90 (shelf) km of paper, photographs, etc.• over a million electronic recordsand this is just material we have decided to keep
    6. 6. Jedi archives(Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, 2002)
    7. 7. secret vatican archivesAngels and Demons, 2006
    8. 8. archives of Gondor(The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001)
    9. 9. archives of Gondor(The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001)where’s his gloves?don’t crumple the2,000 year oldmanuscript!is this to put outthe fire, then?has he been DRINKING !?(no way this is 2,000 years old,btw, faaake)
    10. 10. MI6 archives (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, 2012)
    11. 11. sourcesEdward Kelly to Sergeant Babington1870VPS 937/P0, unit 272
    12. 12. evidenceMeeting notice used in EurekaStockade treason trialsVPRS 5527/P0, unit 4
    13. 13. factsPolice Muster Rolls, 1878VPRS 55/P0, unit 8School Inspector’s Notebooks,Avenel PS, 30 March 1864VPRS 9864/P0, unit 1
    14. 14. storiesPage from inquest into Edward Kelly’sdeath, 1880VPRS 24/P0, unit 411
    15. 15. however…
    16. 16. defining termsDigital curation• is the selection, preservation, maintenance,collection and archiving of digital assets.– Wikipedia, ‘Digital curation’
    17. 17. to curate• select, organize, and present (suitable content, typically for online orcomputational use), using professional or expert knowledge– online Oxford dictionarycontent curation• is the ongoing finding and sharing of relevant digital andnon-digital content about a specific topic for a specificaudience.– National Library of New Zealand
    18. 18. the map is not the territory– Alfred Korzybski• curating and cataloguing• individual records and ‘datasets’• information and stories
    19. 19. this is real• the conversations aren’t ephemeral• privacy and sensitivity considerations whenworking over the internet• workable copyright and licensing arrangements
    20. 20. exposing the highlights• Just a few records or a well-known story• marketing, even branding the organisation• addresses the frequently asked questions
    21. 21. http://prov.vic.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/disaster-at-west-gat
    22. 22. degustation• introduces record types• mixture of ‘useful’ background history for researchand some highlight records• records as though they were art
    23. 23. follow the trail• linking names, dates, places across records.• showcases family history research (but mostresearch is about following people).• relates our systems to common researchquestions
    24. 24. thrill of the chase• meant as a more complete resource around atopic. a mini-archive• interactivity and excitement• but also a destination
    25. 25. records and narrative• viewers may need tools and context(handwriting recognition, 19th-centurybureaucracy)• as little extra text as possible• can one source illuminate another?• treat your narrative as another record
    26. 26. finding themes• strange and familiardoes this exhibition help the audience make senseof their own world or someone else’s?• ‘I’ll show you mine…’connect through shared interests and concerns
    27. 27. working with your community• what are you trying to produce?• where do you fit in the process?
    28. 28. working with your peers• content as ‘currency’but also• stories are shared
    29. 29. education• teachers need packages to slot into curricula
    30. 30. sustainability• marry curation to catalogue, but• separate discussion from resource• persistent URLs, but• expect to migrate (http://web.archive.org/web/20110312040955/http://w)

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