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Building on chapters 4 5 persuasive speaking spring 2015

Building on chapters 4 and 5, Persuasive Speaking

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Building on chapters 4 5 persuasive speaking spring 2015

  1. 1.  When you speak to persuade, you attempted to reinforce, modify, or change audience members’ beliefs, attitudes, opinions, values, and behaviors.  Your objective is to prompt the audience to alter their thinking and possibly take action.
  2. 2. learning about the dynamics of social relationships between individuals, groups and communities. A socially aware individual values human rights and acknowledges the importance of harmonious social interaction for the developmental progress of human beings. Social awareness spans a wide spectrum, beginning with social skills development in early childhood and encompassing the level of social consciousness that leads to social activism and societal transformation (http://www.wikihow.com/Develop-Social-Awareness).
  3. 3. In trying to persuade your audience, you are taking a standpoint. Standpoint refers to the mental place from which an individual views, interprets and evaluates the world. An individual takes a “stand” about her or his “ point” of view!
  4. 4. Should marijuana be legalized in South Carolina? Brainstorm with your partner(s) Write down your standpoint Show your standpoint in writing Example: We believe that marijuana should be legalized in South Carolina for medicinal reasons.
  5. 5.  We believe that marijuana should be legalized in South Carolina for medicinal reasons.  Medicinal reasons will be the main focus of your speech.
  6. 6.  Who are your listeners?  Should you appeal to the listeners attitudes, beliefs and values?  Should you adapt your message to audience demographics?
  7. 7.  Tailoring a speech to fit your audience begins with audience analysis—getting to know the people you’ll be addressing—their interests, views, and familiarity with your topic.  That knowledge allows you to anticipate your listeners’ needs and continues through the presentation of the speech and beyond.
  8. 8.  Speakers can use audience-research questionnaires to gather useful information about audience demographics and psychographics.
  9. 9.  Questionnaire--a series of open and closed ended questions.  Closed ended questions—elicit a small range of specific answers Should marijuana be legalized in the South Carolina? Yes or No
  10. 10.  Open ended questions—allows audience members to elaborate as much as they wish. How do you feel about the legalization of marijuana in South Carolina ? Each group is required to create a survey for the topic!
  11. 11.  Based upon your standpoint/main point, develop 4 questions on marijuana for your audience  Open ended questions  Closed ended questions
  12. 12. Selecting
  13. 13.  Affirmative Action Organic Food VS Fast Food  Animal Experimentation Danger of Cell Phones  Child Labor Community Colleges VS Four Year Colleges  Organic Foods/Fast Foods Higher Education  Cloning Living Together Before Marriage  Voting Rights Acts Racial Profiling  Does Capital Punishment Deter Crime?  Domestic Violence  Legalizing Drugs  Internet/Social Media  Gay Marriages/Relationships/Adoptions  Guns and Crime  Home Schooling  US Immigration Policy  Interracial Relationships/Marriages  Is the Death Penalty Fair?  Organ Transplants  Policing Police  Physician Assisted Suicide  Video Games  Wars
  14. 14.  Brainstorming  Affirming Your Position  Standpoint
  15. 15.  Standpoint refers to the mental place from which an individual views, interprets and evaluates the world. An individual takes a “stand” about her or his “ point” of view!
  16. 16. Brainstorm with Partner(s) for Ideas Create A Standpoint Review Persuasive Speech Criteria Develop An Audience Research Questionnaire Research sources that support your Standpoint
  17. 17.  Using Sources From Our Library http://libguides.hgtc.edu/spc205_graham  Good Persuasive Speeches contain accurate, relevant, and interesting supporting materials
  18. 18.  Examples—illustrate, describe, or present things. Their purpose is to aid understanding by making ideas, items, or events more concrete.  Share stories—one of the most powerful means of conveying a message is through a story (also called narrative)
  19. 19.  Testimony-is firsthand findings, eyewitness accounts  Lay testimony-or a testimony by non experts such as eyewitnesses, can reveal compelling firsthand information that may be unavailable to others.
  20. 20. Provide Facts and Statistics Most people require some type of evidence  Facts represent documented occurrences, including actual events, dates, times, people and places.  Statistics are qualified evidence that summarizes, compares and predicts things.
  21. 21. Each group is required to have supporting materials that documents at least two facts and or statistics. ****They can be a part of the speech or in your Hand-out
  22. 22. Use Percentages to Express Proportions  A percentage is the qualified portion of a whole  In creating your data from your questionnaire, each group can use percentages to express portions
  23. 23.  Books  Newspapers  Periodicals  Government Publications FirstGov.gov  Encyclopedias  Almanacs  Biographical Resources  Online Materials
  24. 24.  Introduce Yourselves  State Your Standpoint  Introduce Your Four Questions  Pass-0ut Survey
  25. 25. What will you do with your Data from the Surveys?
  26. 26.  Primary Research is original or firsthand research such as interviews and questionnaires.  The questionnaires are a part of your primary research.  The data that you collect should be in the written speech and/or the hand-out.
  27. 27. Use Percentages to Express Proportions  A percentage is the qualified portion of a whole  In examining your data from your questionnaire, each group can use percentages to express portions
  28. 28.  Example: In our recent survey that we conducted in this class, we found that 90 percent of you all felt that domestic violence is a cruel act. While the other 10 percent of you all were really unsure about your feelings on domestic violence.
  29. 29.  The most likely sources of secondary research include books, newspapers, periodicals, government publications, blogs and reference works such as encyclopedias, almanacs, books of quotations, atlases and individual search engines(Google, Yahoo!, and MSN Search)
  30. 30. In your speech, alert the audience to the source of any ideas not your own: Speech Excerpt Indicating a paraphrase: As reported in the August 8th , 2005, edition of Newsweek, Executive Chef Jorge of the New York City public schools claimed that until recently, virtually every piece of chicken that was served was breaded or glazed; students
  31. 31. drank whole rather than skim milk, and ate white rather than whole-wheat bread. Example of a direct quote: “The nation’s emergency rooms have been stretched thin for at least a decade or more.” (New York Times Editorial Quotation)
  32. 32. Good afternoon everyone, my name is _______________ and this is my co-host ______________. Welcome to HGTC News and today’s hot topic is whether or not sexual education should be taught within our schools. In order to explore this topic, how many of you have children of your own? And let us see a show of hands from those of you who feel that sex education should be taught in our schools? Well, my partner and I are firm believers that sex education should be taught in the schools because our research shows that it reduces unplanned pregnancies (Stand point).
  33. 33.  You can use the informal pronoun… YOU  Create a conversation within your writing  Draw your audience into your speech by using attention getters  You can also draw your audience into your speech by creating vocal variety in your delivery  Interaction with your partner(s)
  34. 34. As a rule, people have more interest and pay more attention to topics toward which they have positive attitudes and that are in keeping with their values and beliefs. The less we know about something, the more indifferent we tend to be. Any speaker seeking a change in attitudes or behavior would do well to remember this!

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