edTPA Module 5: Addressing Students with Special Needs

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edTPA Module 5: Addressing Students with Special Needs

  1. 1. The  edTPA:    Session  5:   Addressing  the  Needs  of  Students  with  Special  Needs   Hunter  College  School  of  Education  
  2. 2. A  brief  legal  history     Educa&on  for  all  Handicapped  act  1975     Americans  with  Disabili&es  Act  1990     Provision  of  supports  in  the  most  integrated  se@ng     Present  day  Individuals  with  Disabili&es  in   Educa&on  Act     Least  Restric&ve  Environment  (LRE)     Free  and  Appropriate  Educa&on  (FAPE)     Individualized  Educa&on  Plan    
  3. 3. Individualized  Education  Plan     Provided  to  students  who  fall  under  one  of  13   diagnos&c  categories     Individualized  goals  for  each  student     Related  services    Occupa&onal  Therapy,  Physical  Therapy,  Speech  Therapy,  Counseling,  Para  educator…     Supplementary  aids  and  services    Examples:  Modifica&ons  to  curriculum,  Assis&ve  Technology,  Copy  of  class  notes,  Large  print   materials,  Exams  read  aloud…  
  4. 4. A  little  information  about  504  plans     Students  may  have  a  504  if  they  have  a  disability   which  does  not  impact  their  learning  enough  to  be   covered  under  IDEA,  but  s&ll  requires   accommoda&ons     These  accommoda&ons  might  include  such  things   as  extended  &me,  refocusing  and  redirec&on,   ques&ons  read  and  re  phrased,  and  color  coded   materials  
  5. 5. Response  to  Intervention  (RTI)     RTI  is  a  mul&  level  support  system  designed  to  offer   degrees  of  interven&on  to  all  students     RTI  process  includes  universal  screening       Struggling  students  are  provided  with  interven&ons   and  monitored       Tier  1-­‐  High  quality  instruc&on,  screening  a  group  interven&ons     Tier  2-­‐  Targeted  interven&ons     Tier  3-­‐  Intensive  interven&ons,  Comprehensive  evalua&on  
  6. 6. To  Reach  and  Teach  Students  with  Disabilities   one  must:     Be  masters  of  content     Be  flexible  in  delivery  of  instruc&on     Be  willing  and  able  to  collaborate     Knowledgeable  about  human  difference     Hold  high  expecta&ons  for  all  of  our  students   regardless  of  the  label  they  have  been  given  
  7. 7. Having  students  with  disabilities  in  our  classrooms   …     Is  o]en  an  eye  opening  experience  as  these   children  o]en  force  us  to  be  the  best  teachers  we   can  be     Opens  up  the  classroom  to  en&rely  new   perspec&ves  within  our  curriculum     Forces  us  to  find  new  ways  to  teach  familiar  topics     Demands  that  we  consider  all  the  ways  we   influence  each  other  as  human  beings     Shows  us  that  intelligence  is  far  from  linear  
  8. 8. Helpful  Perspectives  for  Planning:     Differen&ated  Instruc&on    Content    Process    Product     Universal  Design    A  proac&ve  stance    Eye  on  the  “big  picture” `    
  9. 9. A  few  more  perspectives  for  planning     Blooms  Taxonomy    Six  levels  of  ques&oning    Simple  to  complex     Gardner’s  Mul&ple   Intelligences    Everyone  possesses  varying  types  of  intelligence    Good  instruc&on  taps  on  several  of  these  
  10. 10. And  for  instruction:              Building  on  student  strengths     se  flexible  groupings   U   ather  frequent  feedback   G   vidence-­‐based  clearly  defined  objec&ves  for  all   E students     acilitate  meaningful  engagement   F
  11. 11. Assessment  should  involve:     Forma&ve  assessments-­‐  ongoing  and  frequent     Summa&ve  assessments-­‐  to  assess  growth  over   &me     Evidence  of  differen&a&on     Well  designed  rubrics  
  12. 12. Students  with  gifts  and  talents     According  to  the  Federal  Government,  “Gi]ed  and  Talented”     is  described  as:   “Students,  children,  or  youth  who  give  evidence  of  high   achievement  capability  in  areas  such  as  intellectual,  crea&ve,   ar&s&c,  or  leadership  capacity,  or  in  specific  academic  fields,   and  who  need  services  and  ac&vi&es  not  ordinarily  provided   by  the  school  in  order  to  fully  develop  those  capabili&es.”  
  13. 13. Students  with  gifts  and  talents     In  New  York,  a  mandated  learning  plan,  like  an  IEP   or  504  plan,  is  not  required  for  gi]ed  students     Frequently,  you  will  have  students  who  have  been   iden&fied  as  gi]ed  and  may  have  already  mastered   the  learning  segment  and  central  focus  you   intended  to  teach.       Remember,  just  because  a  student  is  iden&fied   gi]ed  in  math,  does  not  necessarily  mean  he/she  is   gi]ed  in  all  subject  areas.       Likewise,  many  students  with  disabili&es  can  also  be   considered  gi]ed  and  talented  
  14. 14. Some  approached  to  working  students   identified  as    gifted  and  talented   As  these  students  may  vary  in  terms  of  their  speed,  depth  of  engagement,  and  interest   in  curriculum  topics,  they  may  need  specialized  approaches  to  instruc&on—such  as   providing  opportuni&es  to     ary  learning  ac&vi&es,  including  choices   V   Demonstra&on  of  learning  in  mul&ple  ways     Stories,  plays,  a  video,  a  booklet  and  so  on     ffer  choices  through  curriculum  compac&ng   O   Pre  assessment  to  assess  curriculum  mastery     Op&on  for  addi&onal  inves&ga&ons  if  mastery  is  present   Develop  their  academic,  ar&s&c,  and  leadership  strengths  through         Self  directed  learning:  problem  finding  and  problem  solving   Elaborate,  complex,  and  in-­‐depth  inves&ga&ons  into  areas  of  student  interest   For  more  informa&on,  please  see:   The  Na&onal  Associa&on  for  the  Gi]ed  Website  at  www.nagc.org  
  15. 15. Task  1:  Planning  for  Instruction  and   Assessment         Be  clear  about  instruc&onal  objec&ves     Align  plans  with  standards  and  IEP  goals     Prepare  to  support  with  scaffolds     Connect  with  focus  learners’  strengths  and  needs       Prepare    graphic  organizers     Prepare  sentence  starters     Be  ready  with  differen&ated  materials     Appeal  to  different  learning  styles  with  a  mul&sensory   approach  
  16. 16. Task  2:  Instructing  and  Engaging  Students   in    Learning   Teacher  candidates  are  required  to  consider:       Which  instruc4onal  strategies  support  the   development  of  a  skill     How  instruc4on  can  be  differen4ated  by   readiness,  interest  and  or  learning  style     Various  instruc4on  supports  communica4on   skills     …  and  how  instruc4on  builds  on  strengths  to   build  competence  in  areas  of  weakness    nstruc&on  builds  on  strengths  to  build  competence   I in  areas  of  weakness  
  17. 17. Task  3:  Assessing  Students’Learning     At  least  one  of  the  students  (in  your  3  submimed  student  work   samples)  must  have  specific  learning  needs     1.  Iden&fy  the  area  of  concern  or  area  of  struggle    Interpreta&on  of  text    Crea&on  of  wrimen  document    Computa&onal  or  procedural       2.  Show  how  you  used  feedback  to  shape  your  approach  to  this   child’s  areas  of  struggle    Provide  an  alternate  text    Provide  a  graphic  organizer    Connect  skill  to  area  of  interest  of  student    Provide  procedural  support  or  alternate  approach     3.  Demonstrate  progress  toward  curricular  goals  
  18. 18. Complete  the  chart  below  to  summarize  required  or  needed  supports,   accommodations,  or  modifications  for  your  students  that  will  affect  your       instruction  in  this  learning  segment   Students  with  Specific  Learning  Needs   IEP/504  Plans:   Classifica&ons/Needs   Number  of  Students   Supports,  Accommoda&ons,   Modifica&ons,  Per&nent  IEP   Goals   Example:  Visual  Processing   2   Close  monitoring,  large  print   text,  window  card  to  isolate   text   Example:  ADHD   4   Refocusing  and  redirec&on,   preferen&al  sea&ng,  posi&ve   behavior  support  plan,  tes&ng   in  separate  loca&on   Example:  Learning  disabled   3   Graphic  organizers  for  wrimen   work,  extended  &me,   ques&ons  clarified,  direc&ons   read  aloud  
  19. 19. Complete  the  chart  below  to  summarize  required  or  needed  supports,   accommodations,  or  modifications  for  your  students  that  will  affect  your  instruction  in   this  learning  segment   Students  with  Specific  Learning  Needs   IEP/504  Plans:   Classifica&ons/Needs   Number  of  Students   Supports,  Accommoda&ons,   Modifica&ons,  Per&nent  IEP  Goals   Example:  Au&sm   1   Posi&ve  behavior  support  plan,   test  in  small  group  se@ng,  allow   for  answers  to  be  given  via   computer,  special  ligh&ng   Example:  ADHD   3   Provide  copy  of  class  notes,  test  in   separate  loca&ons,  ques&ons  read,   direc&ons  clarified,  calculator  use     Example:  Hearing  loss   1   Personal  hearing  device,  Personal   FM  system,  Extra  &me  for   processing  informa&on,   preferen&al  sea&ng,  note  taker  
  20. 20. Spotlighting  Adolescent  Learners     Strategies  we  have  suggested  so  far  are  equally  applicable   across  the  grade  1  through  12  curriculum.  To  state  the   obvious,  each  depends  upon  the  context  of  the  classroom  and   each  student’s  needs.     That  said,  it  is  worthwhile  to  spotlight  adolescent  learners— as  they  face  an  increasingly  complex  and  demanding   curriculum  with  ach  passing  grade.     One  simple  approach  is  to  ask  yourself  what  you  may  need  to   change.  Is  it  the  rate,  the  volume,  or  the  complexity?  
  21. 21. Spotlighting  Adolescent  Learners     RATE  –                              Can  you  increase  or  decrease  &me  demands  of  the  task?     VOLUME  –                            Can  you  increase  or  decrease  the  number  or  length  of  the       task?     COMPLEXITY  –                              Can  you  increase  the  complexity  of  the  task?  
  22. 22. Spotlighting  Adolescent  Learners     BE  STRATEGIC:     Do  you  need  to  provide  an  ACCOMMODATION  or  an   INTERVENTION?     Accommoda&on  =  go  around  a  problem  area  to  help  the   student  complete  a  task     Interven&on  =  deliberately  target  a  problem  area  to  help  the   student  prac&ce  specific  skills  that  he  or  she  needs  to  build   up.     For  more  informa&on:  see  “ Teaching  Every  Adolescent  Every  Day:  Learning  in  Diverse  Middle  and   High  School  Classrooms”  by  Deshler,  Schumaker,  Harris,  &  Graham.    
  23. 23. Resources  on  Inclusion  of  Students  with  Disabilities   –  page  1  of  3    hmp://arisecoali&on.org/    Coali&on  to  support  inclusion  of  people  with  disabili&es    hmp://www.inclusion-­‐ny.org/files/nyctaskforce-­‐book.pdf    Free  booklet  on  Inclusion  in  New  York  State    hmp://www.bcatml.org/POT/inclusive.pdf      Ar&cle  on  Inclusive  Educa&on    hmp://www.inclusion.com/resliteracy.html    Webpage  of  School  Resources  on  Inclision    hmp://teachingld.org/about/    Teachers  of  students  with  learning  disabili&es    www.casel.org      Social  and  emo&onal  learning  for  students  preschool  to  high  school.    hmp://www.powerof2.org/    Focus  on  teacher  collabora&on.        hmp://www.cldinterna&onal.org/    Council  for  learning  disabili&es      
  24. 24. Resources  on  Inclusion  of  Students  with   Disabilities  2  of  3    hmp://www.disabilitystudiesforteachers.org/    Disability  studies  for  teachers  (curricula  and  materials)    hmp://www.disabilityisnatural.com/    Disability  is  natural    hmp://www.inclusion.com/inclusionpress.html    Inclusion  Press    hmp://www.inclusiondaily.com/    Interna&onal  Disability  Rights  New  Service    hmp://idea.ed.gov/    Building  the  legacy  of  IDEA        hmp://www.museumofdisability.org/    Museum  of  Disability  
  25. 25. Resources  on  Inclusion  of  Students  with   Disabilities:  Texts  from  SPED  308/708  
  26. 26. Resources  on  Inclusion  of  Students  with  Disabilities:   Documentaries    Include…  
  27. 27. Final  Tips  and  Take  Aways:     Operate  from  a  strengths  based  perspec&ve     Work  on  targeted  areas  where  growth  is  needed     Use  strengths  to  build  competence  in  all  areas     Solid  interpersonal  skills-­‐  collabora&ve  style     Must  be  familiar  with  informa&on  in  an  IEP     Lesson  plans  must  feature  possible   accommoda&ons  
  28. 28. This  has  been  a  collaboration  between:   Diane  Linder  Berman,  Adjunct  Instructor   Dr.  Elissa  Brown,  Dis&nguished  Professor,  Gi]ed  &  Talented   Dr.  David  J.  Connor,  Professor,  Learning  Disabili&es   Dr.  Laura  Baecher,  Assistant  Professor,  TESOL  

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