Fringe leadership gym - opm

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Fringe leadership gym - opm

  1. 1. Leadership Gym Finding new ways of thinking
  2. 2. Making connections: brains and thinking <ul><li>“ The difference between linear and complex adaptive systems is the difference between throwing a rock and throwing a bird” </li></ul><ul><li>Jake Chapman, “Systems failure” </li></ul>
  3. 3. In order to be good leaders in times of change.. <ul><li>…We need to help our organisation think well. </li></ul><ul><li>To do that, a leader has to be as self-aware about </li></ul><ul><li>how we and others think, as we are self-aware </li></ul><ul><li>about how we and others behave. </li></ul><ul><li>We need to use a range of ‘thinking’ tools, </li></ul><ul><li>choosing the right tool for the right situation. </li></ul>
  4. 4. The way we think about a problem will shape the solution we find… <ul><li>Usual ways of thinking… </li></ul><ul><li>Extrapolating from personal experience </li></ul><ul><li>Analysing evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Reasoning.. Deducing </li></ul>
  5. 5. Thinking approaches that work better with uncertainty… <ul><li>Drawing on emotional intelligence – what are others feeling? How does that impact on their actions? What would bring their leadership into the room? </li></ul><ul><li>Exploratory thinking…What if? How could things be different? What is possible? What are the possible options? What might happen? </li></ul><ul><li>Integrative – synthetic – bringing together different ‘versions’ of what is happening – recognising everyone sees a valid ‘truth’. </li></ul><ul><li>Systems thinking – understanding the system effects that sustain inertia and keep people doing unproductive or unhelpful things.. How can the system be disrupted or changed? </li></ul>
  6. 6. An example: Systems thinking <ul><li>Systems thinking is helpful in ambiguity and uncertainty </li></ul><ul><li>When there is unpredictability that is inherent in the situation </li></ul><ul><li>When there are strong links to other problem areas that are also complex </li></ul><ul><li>When there is a sense of being over-loaded, not in control. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Good tools for systems thinking: <ul><li>Active listening </li></ul><ul><li>Rich pictures </li></ul><ul><li>System maps </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple cause diagrams </li></ul><ul><li>Ideal systems </li></ul><ul><li>Role play… </li></ul>
  8. 8. Multiple Cause Diagrams (devised by Jake Chapman) <ul><li>Used to trace the sequence of cause and effect through a situation/system.. </li></ul><ul><li>Creates a tool to enable debate about what is going on.. </li></ul><ul><li>Clarification comes in the process of trying something, realising something missing and starting again </li></ul><ul><li>Helps to: </li></ul><ul><li>To clarify one’s own thinking </li></ul><ul><li>identify potential interventions </li></ul><ul><li>identify feedback loops </li></ul><ul><li>No use at all in finding (or justifying) instant solutions..but then, in complexity, instant solutions are usually wrong.. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Example targets set to improve performance targets incorporated into performance management professionals feel distrusted delivery staff focus on target rather than client activity on target distorts system service to clients deteriorates increased dissatisfaction with service increased pressure on politicians to improve situation
  10. 10. Example targets set to improve performance targets incorporated into performance management professionals feel distrusted delivery staff focus on target rather than client activity on target distorts system service to clients deteriorates increased dissatisfaction with service increased pressure on politicians to improve situation causes or leads to causes or leads to causes or leads to targets incorporated into performance management
  11. 11. Multiple Cause Diagrams <ul><li>Each item in the diagram is a factor – usually something that varies </li></ul><ul><li>Each arrow means ‘causes’ or ‘leads to’ </li></ul><ul><li>Aim to have between 10 and 20 items in the diagram </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback loops have to have the arrows going in the same direction around the loop </li></ul>
  12. 12. Committee example (from Jake Chapman) Committee held in low regard
  13. 13. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme papers unread attendance low priority
  14. 14. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority
  15. 15. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority
  16. 16. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority Committee operating at too detailed a level most agenda items irrelevant to individuals
  17. 17. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority senior people absent send a deputy Committee operating at too detailed a level most agenda items irrelevant to individuals come unprepared
  18. 18. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority senior people absent send a deputy Committee operating at too detailed a level lack of corporate or strategic debate most agenda items irrelevant to individuals come unprepared
  19. 19. Devising interventions <ul><li>Is there one item that is pivotal to the diagram? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the items that only have arrows leaving them (the starting items)? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any feedback loops, and if so how could they be influenced? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there a part of the diagram that deserves expansion? </li></ul>
  20. 20. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority senior people absent send a deputy Committee operating at too detailed a level lack of corporate or strategic debate most agenda items irrelevant to individuals come unprepared Pivotal issues
  21. 21. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority senior people absent send a deputy Committee operating at too detailed a level lack of corporate or strategic debate most agenda items irrelevant to individuals come unprepared Feedback loop Committee held in low regard send a deputy senior people absent Committee held in low regard send a deputy
  22. 22. Committee example Committee held in low regard lack of challenge lack of understanding of programme lack of corporate thinking no shared vision culture of silo working papers unread attendance low priority senior people absent send a deputy Committee operating at too detailed a level lack of corporate or strategic debate most agenda items irrelevant to individuals come unprepared Starting items
  23. 23. Multiple Cause Diagrams <ul><li>Key issue is getting the ‘level’ of the starting item right </li></ul><ul><li>Aim for something that has three or four causes and a few effects </li></ul><ul><li>Very common for people to realise they have started with the wrong issue – this is clarification! </li></ul><ul><li>Do not combine ideas into a single item </li></ul>
  24. 24. So homework… <ul><li>Choose a problem that is too complex to solve… and try a new way of thinking… </li></ul><ul><li>We suggest: </li></ul><ul><li>Practising using multiple-cause diagrams.. Often it takes several tries to make them work </li></ul><ul><li>Drawing a ‘rich picture’ of the situation </li></ul><ul><li>Creating an emotional map – of the feelings, fears, hopes of the different actors </li></ul><ul><li>Analyse using ‘what if?’ questions. Ask yourself ‘what is possible here?’ </li></ul><ul><li>Try ‘deep listening’ to identify the different ‘truths’ in the different perspectives on the problem. Listen until you understand how it looks to others.. keep going until you have all the perspectives. Then look again at the problem… </li></ul>

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