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The Appalachian Trail
& Wind Power
An Uneasy Alliance
Does MATC/AMC
Support Wind Power?
• The Maine Appalachian Trail Club (MATC) supports significant
increases in renewable en...
“Energy Issues: Because there are both societal benefits to
renewable energy and significant adverse impacts associated
wi...
Reddington Wind
Permit denied in 2007
2008 Wind
Energy Act
• Wind Projects are a Permissible
Use in LURC Jurisdiction
• Wind Power is Presumed
“Good”
• NoVisual...
Record Hill
Record Hill from East Baldpate. Mt. Blue in the Distance.
Cumulative Impact
• 8-mile, 15-mile &
25-mile rings.
• Existing (402 MW)
and developing
projects (382
MW).
• 850 MW in
pla...
West Range project: Iberdrola
Higher Turbines
120 m
394-ft.
150 m
492-ft.
175 m
574-ft.
2008 2012 2015
Wind Assessment Study
• 15 wind-related bills
submitted to Legislature
in 2011.
• All rejected by EUT
committee & Governor...
• Visual assessments up to 15
miles.
• Consider cumulative visual
impacts.
• Require DEP approved
Decommissioning Plan.
An...
More than 50% of Maine’s
wind generating capacity
was built prior to the
Wind Act.
After 7 years, it is time to
recalibrat...
The Appalachian Trail and Wind Power:  An uneasy alliance
The Appalachian Trail and Wind Power:  An uneasy alliance
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The Appalachian Trail and Wind Power: An uneasy alliance

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MATC's policy recognizes the need to develop Wind Power however, this need must be balanced against the scenic, natural and  recreational resources of the AT in Maine.    Careful siting is crucial. The 'expedited Wind Power' Act of 2008 set a goal of 2,000 MW of installed wind power capacity by 2015. It is unlikely that this goal will be met but wind power projects have certainly increased during the past 5 years and Maine has become the center of wind energy production in New England.  We also have over 6 years of experience under this law (passed as emergency legislation) and have a better handle on how the siting of wind projects has affected the Appalachian Trail and Maine's scenic landscapes.   Is it time to recalibrate the Wind Power Act to better balance wind power development with protection of Maine's AT?

Published in: Environment
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The Appalachian Trail and Wind Power: An uneasy alliance

  1. 1. The Appalachian Trail & Wind Power An Uneasy Alliance
  2. 2. Does MATC/AMC Support Wind Power? • The Maine Appalachian Trail Club (MATC) supports significant increases in renewable energy ………. The MATC recognizes the need to develop wind power as a renewable energy source. • The Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) supports significant increases in renewable energy that result in actual greenhouse gas and air pollutant reductions and is balanced with strong protection of natural and recreational resources of statewide, regional or national significance. Yes, but a Qualified Yes
  3. 3. “Energy Issues: Because there are both societal benefits to renewable energy and significant adverse impacts associated with the installation of wind farms, the benefits of any individual project must be weighed in relation to the costs. Some of these factors include: Source of power that is likely to be displaced by the wind farm: Will the wind displace fossil-fuel plants or other renewable sources? (This is a remarkably complex question, but in some circumstances it seems likely that wind will not displace fossil fuels, but rather will lead to closure of biomass generation or increased peaking of hydroelectric dams.) Power production in relation to the severity of impacts: Will the amount of power produced be in proportion to the severity of the impacts?” Policy on Wind-Energy Facilities (As adopted by the ATC Board of Directors on November 3, 2007)
  4. 4. Reddington Wind Permit denied in 2007
  5. 5. 2008 Wind Energy Act • Wind Projects are a Permissible Use in LURC Jurisdiction • Wind Power is Presumed “Good” • NoVisual Impact if > 8 miles • Expedited Areas, fees and procedures.
  6. 6. Record Hill Record Hill from East Baldpate. Mt. Blue in the Distance.
  7. 7. Cumulative Impact • 8-mile, 15-mile & 25-mile rings. • Existing (402 MW) and developing projects (382 MW). • 850 MW in planning – not shown.
  8. 8. West Range project: Iberdrola
  9. 9. Higher Turbines 120 m 394-ft. 150 m 492-ft. 175 m 574-ft. 2008 2012 2015
  10. 10. Wind Assessment Study • 15 wind-related bills submitted to Legislature in 2011. • All rejected by EUT committee & Governor. • Under pressure, passed a “resolve”. • 25 Recommendations to Improve the current Wind Act.
  11. 11. • Visual assessments up to 15 miles. • Consider cumulative visual impacts. • Require DEP approved Decommissioning Plan. An Act to Protect Maine’s Scenic Character LD 1147 .
  12. 12. More than 50% of Maine’s wind generating capacity was built prior to the Wind Act. After 7 years, it is time to recalibrate the Wind Act to better balance wind power development with protection of Maine’s “Quality of Place”. Amendments to the Act will not stop future wind power development.

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