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Enabling Innovation using Lean Startup

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Enabling Innovation using Lean Startup

  1. 1. ENABLING INNOVATION Using Lean Startup & Innovation Accounting LUKAS FITTL @lfittl spark59.com Lean Startup is trademarked by Eric Ries and used with permission. Business Model Canvas is created by Alex Osterwalder and licensed under CC-BY-SA.
  2. 2. About Myself Founded 2 tech startups, worked with many others & Spark59
  3. 3. Innovation in an Agile Environment
  4. 4. Waterfall Risk BU ILD BU ILD B UILD Time Release!
  5. 5. Agile / XP / SCRUM Risk BUILD BUILD BUILD BUILD Time Release! Release! Release! Release!
  6. 6. Are we making our product better or worse?
  7. 7. Are we efficient? vs Are we effective?
  8. 8. The Definition of Done should include testing customer behaviour
  9. 9. Validated Learning
  10. 10. IDEAS LEARN BUILD DATA PRODUCT MEASURE Experiment
  11. 11. “State, before you do the work, this is what I believe will happen, and when you do the the work see whether it happens or not.” - Jabe Bloom
  12. 12. Hypotheses instead of Requirements
  13. 13. Requirement: Users can create 3D avatars.
  14. 14. Hypothesis: We believe that users will create a 3D avatar and spend more time on other users profiles.
  15. 15. Falsifiable Hypothesis: 50% of newly signed up users will create a 3D avatar, Avg time spent on user profiles will go from 30s to 1min+
  16. 16. Be closer to reality, and avoid bias & comfort zones
  17. 17. User Stories != Experiments Missing the “Measure” Stage No Way to Validate the Learning
  18. 18. Deploy != Launch if $rollout.active?(:chat, current_user) ... else ... end
  19. 19. Deploy Every Commit Release To A Small Set of Customers Launch The New Feature When Ready
  20. 20. Experiments need to be shown to actual customers Not just to your team!
  21. 21. Tools & Ta c tics Lean Stack: Experiment Reports
  22. 22. EXPERIMENT REPORT Title: [TITLE] Author: [NAME] Created: [DATE] Background Results What are you trying to learn or achieve? Enter the data. Falsifiable Hypothesis Your list of statements on the expected outcome of the experiment. Use this format: [Specific Repeatable Action] will [Expected Measurable Outcome] Validated Learning VALIDATED or INVALIDATED Summarize your learning from the experiment. Experiment Scope How many and/or how long will the experiment last? Minimum Build Plan List the build plan step by step to get your measurement and experiment. Next Action Whatʼs the next experiment? Lean Stack by Spark59.com
  23. 23. EXPERIMENT REPORT Title: [TITLE] Author: [NAME] Created: [DATE] Background Results What are you trying to learn or achieve? Enter the data. Falsifiable Hypothesis Your list of statements on the expected outcome of the experiment. Use this format: [Specific Repeatable Action] will [Expected Measurable Outcome] Validated Learning VALIDATED or INVALIDATED Summarize your learning from the experiment. Experiment Scope How many and/or how long will the experiment last? Minimum Build Plan List the build plan step by step to get your measurement and experiment. Next Action Whatʼs the next experiment? Lean Stack by Spark59.com
  24. 24. Background What are you trying to learn or achieve? Give Context. Why is this relevant?
  25. 25. Falsifiable Hypothesis Your list of statements on the expected outcome of the experiment. Use this format: [Specific Repeatable Action] will [Expected Measurable Outcome] Quantify Your Goals
  26. 26. Experiment Scope How long will the experiment last? Minimum Build Plan List the build plan step by step to get your measurement and experiment. Set Scope & Timebox
  27. 27. Planning an Experiment 1. Context - Why is this relevant? 2. Quantify Your Goals 3. Set Scope & Timebox
  28. 28. Test your Value and your Growth Hypothesis first
  29. 29. Validated Learning: Define Hypothesis, Build & Launch Experiment, Learn from the Results
  30. 30. Concepts for making this work: 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing
  31. 31. Hierarchy 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding Anarchy 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing Lean Startup
  32. 32. 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing
  33. 33. Centralized Product Ownership Cross-Functional Product Customers Team Owner
  34. 34. Distributed Product Ownership Business Cross-Functional Customers Stakeholder Team
  35. 35. Product Ownership is about Defining Customer Value, not Aesthetics
  36. 36. Business Experiments instead of ( just) Development Tasks
  37. 37. Experiments are Owned By A Team Member
  38. 38. Draws Expert Resources as needed (e.g. through pairing)
  39. 39. 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing
  40. 40. Why? are we doing what we’re doing
  41. 41. Team needs to Understand The Impact of their work
  42. 42. “Shared understanding is about getting everyone to walk in the other person’s shoes a little.” Bill Scott - UX at Netflix, PayPal This includes the business owner’s shoes!
  43. 43. Are we making progress towards our business goal?
  44. 44. Tools & Ta c tics Company-Wide Metrics Dashboard
  45. 45. Actionable Accessible Auditable
  46. 46. Actionable Tie specific repeatable actions to observed results.
  47. 47. Accessible Let everyone in the company see and understand whats going on.
  48. 48. Auditable Tie the numbers back to actual customers, so you can verify the metric and believe in it.
  49. 49. You need all three ACTIONABLE AUDITABLE ACCESSIBLE
  50. 50. Unit Economics instead of Gross Revenue
  51. 51. Dave McClure’s AARRR Metrics ACQUISITION How do users find you? ACTIVATION Do users have a reat first experience? RETENTION Do users come back? REVENUE How do you make money? REFERRAL Do users tell others?
  52. 52. Value Metrics How do users find you? ACQUISITION Do users have a great first experience? ACTIVATION Do users come back? RETENTION How do you make money? REVENUE Do users tell others? REFERRAL
  53. 53. Growth Metrics How do users find you? ACQUISITION Do users have a great first experience? ACTIVATION Do users come back? RETENTION How do you make money? REVENUE Do users tell others? REFERRAL
  54. 54. Tools & Ta c tics Cross-Functional Pairing
  55. 55. Tools & Ta c tics Weekly Strategy Meeting Part 1: Ideation
  56. 56. Avoid Brainstorming. It causes Premature Convergence Around One Idea.
  57. 57. By Daniel Cook http://www.lostgarden.com/2010/08/visualizing-creative-process.html
  58. 58. Design Studio by Will Evans @semanticwill
  59. 59. Observe & Explain Ideate Discuss To The Group Alone In the Group Sketch & Write down!
  60. 60. Review Experiments Only In Weekly Meeting Focus On Efficiency In Daily Stand-ups
  61. 61. 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing
  62. 62. Tools & Ta c tics Lean Stack: Validated Learning Board
  63. 63. Kan-ban Board IDEAS Build Measure Learn LEARN BUILD ✓ ✘ DATA PRODUCT MEASURE
  64. 64. Build Measure Learn ✓ ✘
  65. 65. 1 experiment per team member
  66. 66. Separate Task Board for tracking the details Swimlane for each Experiment
  67. 67. Tools & Ta c tics Weekly Strategy Meeting Part 2: Review
  68. 68. Review Experiment Results Challenge the Interpretation Kill / Restart overdue Experiments
  69. 69. EXPERIMENT REPORT Title: [TITLE] Author: [NAME] Created: [DATE] Background Results What are you trying to learn or achieve? Enter the data. Falsifiable Hypothesis Your list of statements on the expected outcome of the experiment. Use this format: [Specific Repeatable Action] will [Expected Measurable Outcome] Validated Learning VALIDATED or INVALIDATED Summarize your learning from the experiment. Experiment Scope How many and/or how long will the experiment last? Minimum Build Plan List the build plan step by step to get your measurement and experiment. Next Action Whatʼs the next experiment? Lean Stack by Spark59.com
  70. 70. Results Enter the data. Actual data you Measured, based on your Hypothesis.
  71. 71. Validated Learning Summarize your learning from the experiment. + Validated Invalidated Why? Inconclusive
  72. 72. Next Action Whatʼs the next experiment? What will you do next based on your learning?
  73. 73. ✘ Failure is good. Validated Learning is our Measurement of Progress.
  74. 74. 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing
  75. 75. Timeboxing
  76. 76. Build Measure Learn ✓ ✘
  77. 77. Experiment Scope Build Measure Learn ✓ ✘
  78. 78. Startups don’t starve, they drown. Open-ended learning is dangerous, always timebox.
  79. 79. Recommended Timeboxes: Interviews/Prototypes: 1-2 Weeks Qualitative Tests: 1 Month Quantitative Tests: 2-3 Months
  80. 80. Customer Interview (Paper) Prototype MVP “The Perfect Product” Inside-the-Building Comfort Zone
  81. 81. Get-out-of-the-Building Reality Customer Interview (Paper) Prototype MVP “The Perfect Product”
  82. 82. Justify the Cost of MVPs with Proof
  83. 83. Understand Problem: Explorative Customer Interviews Define Solution: User Testing With Prototypes Validate Qualitatively: Release MVP and hand-collect feedback 10s to 100s of customers Verify Quantitatively: Partial Rollout or Split Test and measure improvement 100s to 10,000s of customers
  84. 84. In Summary
  85. 85. 0. Validated Learning 1. Product Ownership 2. Shared Understanding 3. Accountability 4. Scoping & Timeboxing
  86. 86. Tools & Ta c tics Experiment Reports Company-wide Dashboard Validated Learning Board Weekly Strategy Meeting
  87. 87. Thanks! leanstack.com lukas@spark59.com

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